Графични страници
PDF файл
ePub

(Continued.)

CRANFIELD.

ARRANGER.

Section IV.

Section XII.
Jo. XX. 10–17. Matt. xxvii,

John xx. 18. Mark xvi. 5—8.
915.

Matt. xxviii. 5-8.
Section V.

Section XIII.
Section v.

Matt. xxviii. 8.
Matt. xxviii. Mark xvi. 9.
Joh. xx. pt. 17.

Mark xvi. 8.
18.

Mark xvi. Luke xxiv. 1-9.
9-15.

Section XIV.
10.
10.

Luke xxii. 12.
11.

John xx, 3—11.
11.
24.

Section XV.
Section VI.

Section VI.

John xx. part ver. 11.
Mark xvi. Lu. xxiv, 1-10.

Mark xvi. 12. Luke xxiv. 34. John xx.

Section XVI. 10. 10.

13-16.

John xx. part 11 & 14. 10.

12.

16-35.
11.
11.

19.

Section XVII. 12.

36-40.

19. John xx. part 14. 17. 40-43.

Mark xvi. 9.
20.

23. Section XVIII.
Section VII.

Section VII.

John xx. 18.
Evening of Easter-day.

Matt. xxviii, 9, 10.
1 Cor. xv. 4, 5. Mark xvi. kuke xxiv. John xx.

Mark xvi.

John xx.

Section XIX. 13.

24, 25. Matt. xxviii. 11-16.
12.

Section XX.
13--33.

Luke xxiv. 1-4.
34-36.
19.1

Section XXI.
37-39.

Luke xxiv, 4-9.
40.
41, 42.
20.

Section XXII. 43. 20.

Luke xxiv. 10. 21-23.

Mark xvi, 10.

TOWNSON.

Section IV.

34.

19.

(Continued.)

TOWNSON,

CRANFIELD.

ARRANGER.

Section VIII.

Section VIII.

Section XXIII.

Mark xvi. 11.
Between Easter and next Sunday.

Luke xxiv. 11.
Mark xvi.
John xx.
Mark xvi. 13.

John xx.
14.
26—29.

24, 25.

Section XXIV.

Luke xxiv. 12.
14.

Section XXV.
Section IX.

Section IX.

Luke xxiv. 34.
First Day after the Resurrection,
Matt. xxviij.

Section XXVI.
Mark xvi.

John xx.
16–18.

Mark xvi. 12. 14.

Luke xxiv. 13-33.
28.

Section XXVII.
14.

Luke xxiv. 33-36.
26.
27, 28.

Section XXVIII.
29.

John xx. 19. 14.

Luke xxiv. 36-44.

John xx. 20–24.
Section X.

Section X.

Section XXIX.
In Galilee.

Mark xvi. 13.
Matt. xxviii.

John xxi. John XX. 24, 25.
16-18.

1-24. ਤਾ।

Section XXX.

Mark xvi. 14, 15.
Section XI.

John xx. 26–30.
Section XI.

Section XXXI.
John xxi.
1 Cor. xv. 7. Luke xxiv.

Acts i. 4. Matt. xxviii. 16, 17.
1-24.

44---49.

Section XXXII. 49.

John xxi. 1-25.

Section XXXIII.
Acts i. 4, 5.
Luke xxiv, 44-50.

(Continued.)

[blocks in formation]

Matt. xxviii. Mark xvi.

15.

Lu. xxiv. 50.

Acts i. 6, 7.

2.

Section XXXIV.
Luke xxiv. 50, to the

end.
Mark xvi. 15, to the

end.
Acts i. 6–13.
Matt. xxvii, 18, to the

end.

[blocks in formation]

Section XXXV.
Jobn xxi. 25.

xx. 30, 31.
30, 31.
xxi. 25.

TOWNSON.

Matt. xxviii.

19.
20.

18.
18.

Section XII.
Mark xvi. Luke xxiv.

44-48.
15.
16.

49.
17.
18.

49.
19.

50.
19.

51.

52, 53.
20.

19.
20.

20.

John xx.

30, 31.

John xxi. 25.!

Mark xv. 46.

Mat, xxvii.59.

John xix. 38. Pilate gave him leave;

Jerusalem. Mat. xxvii.58. then Pilate, commanded the body to be deli

vered,
Mark xv. 45. he gave the body to Joseph ?.

And he bought fine linen, and
John xix. 39. He came therefore, and took the body of Jesus.

And when Joseph had taken the body, he

wrapped it in a clean linen cloth,
John xix. 30. there came also Nicodemus, which at the first

came to Jesus by night, and brought a mixture
of myrrh and aloes, about an hundred pound
weight.

Then took they the body of Jesus, and wound
it in clean linen clothes with the spices, as the
manner of the Jews is to bury.

Now in the place where he was crucified there was a garden, and in the garden a new sepulchre,

John xix. 40.

John xix, 41.

It does not appear necessary to enter into any detailed examination of the harmony proposed by Hales, Newcome, Macknight, or Doddridge. The first of these agrees generally with Townson-Newcome's plan is among the number studied by Cranfield, as are also those of Macknight and Doddridge. Since Mr. West's publication indeed, the differences have been very few, and are so entirely questions of opinion, that their decision does not in the least affect the veracity of the Evangelists (R). Thus it cannot be made evident at what exact time our Lord shewed himself to St. Peter on the day of his resurrection, but all are agreed as to the fact. We may, in short, consider the question respecting the consistency of the four Evangelists, to be completely set at rest by the labours of these learned authors. They have left little more to be done by their successors than to incorporate the results of their labours ; and thus make their researches and their discoveries familiar to the common reader. They will always be enumerated among the most eminent illustrators of the sacred volume. They have consecrated their jewels to the service of God, and their offerings will ever shine among the most brilliant ornaments of his holy temple.

? Mark xv. 42. oxías yevouévns, "the early evening being now come,” or “ being immediately past," for the word yevouévns has both these meanings. The early evening began at three in the afternoon, and continued till sunset ; or till about six, and a little after. The late, or second evening, began at six, and lasted till nine. Both evenings are called ófía : but St. Luke describes the earlier evening by a periphrasis, and that which began at sunset by the proper name among the Greeks, eonépa, Luke xxiv. 29.

() When this part of the work was going to press, I procured a work entitled " The New Trial of the Witnesses.” It revives many of the exploded and long answered objections—urges no new remarks and does not appear worthy of more especial notice. Assertion supplies the place of argument, as is usual in the great majority of books of this nature.

Jerusalem

John xix. 41.

And (Joseph) laid it in his own new tomb, Mat. xxvij.CO. which he had hewn out in the rock 3. wherein was never man yet

laid. There laid they Jesus therefore, because of the John xix. 42 Jews preparation day; for the sepulchre was nigh at hand.

And that day was the preparation, and the sab- Lukexxii. 54. bath drew on; and he rolled a great stone to the door of the se. Mat. xxvii.60 pulchre, and departed.

a Mark xv. 42. Luke xxiii.50. John xix. 38.

MATT. xxvii. part of ver. 57, 58.
57 * When the even was come—who also himself was Jesus' disciple :
58 He went to Pilate, and begged the body of Jesus-

3 In Isaiah liji. 9. we read, “He made his grave with the wicked, and with the rich in his death." On referring to the original, it will be observed that the word D'YV7 may be the dual number, and that twy is the singular. The construction therefore may be, “ His death shall be with two criminals, and with one rich man (a).” This rendering adds great force to the prophecy.

The peculiar providence of God ordained, that our Lord should suffer on a day succeeded immediately by the Jewish sabbath, and in a place where an honourable disciple of his had a sepulchre, so lately hewn in the rock, that no one had ever been laid in it. These things decided at once where the body should be deposited, when leave to dispose of it had been obtained by Joseph. His own new sepulchre was nigh at hand. Had it been at a distance, the case would have been altered. The followers of our Lord would have been inclined to carry his body first to the house of some friend, where they would naturally suppose they could perform the ceremonies previous to interment with more honourable tokens of respect. But, while they had been studying to complete them with order and decorum, the sabbath would have come on: and then, wherever the body was, it must have remained till that day of rest was over, and the third was begun, on which he was to rise from the dead. A providential concurrence of circumstances compelled them to take it directly from the cross to a place that best suited the great event of the third day: and where, in the mean while, the Jewish rulers had access to it, and before the beginning of that day set a guard upon it, as a testimony against themselves. If Joseph of Arimathea had not begged the body, it would have been buried in the common grave with the malefactors. In making this request, it is not probable that he could have been actuated by the idea that he was thereby fulfilling a prophecy. We must consider the circumstance as one of those minute, and apparently accidental events, which demonstrate to us that the providence of God overrules all the actions of man, to the accomplishment of his own purposes.

(a) See Doddridge in loc. and Schoetgen, on the manner in which the ancient Jews interpreted the passage Horæ Hebraicæ, vol. ii. p. 552, 553.Lightfoot's Harmony, 8vo, edit. vol. iii. p. 168.

« ПредишнаНапред »