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bimself, he inquired of the beautiful captive, in the most civil and polite manner, concerning her country, birth, and connexions; and finding that she was betrothed to a Celtiberian prince, named Allucius, he ordered both him and the captive parents to be sent for.

When the Spanish prince appeared in his presence, Scipio took him aside; and, to remove the anxiety he might feel on account of the young lady, addressed him in these words: 6 You and I are young, which admits of my speaking to you with freedom. They who brought me your future spouse, assured me, at the same time, that you loved her with extreme tenderness; and her beauty and merit left me no room to doubt it. Upon which, I reflected, that, if I were in your situation, I should hope to meet with favor. I therefore think myself happy, in the present conjuncture, to do you a service.

Though the fortune of war has made me your master, I desire to be your friend. Here is your wife; take her, and may you be happy! You may rest assured, that she has been amongst us, as she would have been in the house of her father and mother. Far be it from Scipio to purchase any pleasure at the expense of virtue, honor, and the happiness of an honest man! No; I have kept her for you, in order to make you a present worthy of you, and of me. The only gratitude I require of you, for this inestimable gift, is, that you will be a friend to the Roman people."

Allucius's heart was too full to make him any answer; but, throwing himself at the general's feet, he wept aloud. The captive lady fell down in the same posture, and remained so, till the aged father, overwhelmed with transports of joy, burst into the fellowing words: “Oh, excellent Scipio! Heaven has given thee more than human virtue. O glorious leader! Owondrous youth! what pleasure can equal

that which must now fill thy heart, on hearing the prayers of this grateful virgin, for thy health and prosperity!"

Such was Scipio; a soldier, a youth, a heathen! nor was his virtue unrewarded. Allucius, charmed with such magnanimity, liberality, and politeness, returned to his own country, and published, on all occasions, the praises of his generous and humane victor; crying out, “that there was come into Spain a young hero, who conquered all things less by the force of his arms, than by the charms of his virtue, and the greatness of his beneficence.

LESSON TWENTY-FIRST.

The Happy Choice.
Beset with snares on every hand,
In life's uncertain path I stand:
Father Divine! diffuse thy light,
To guide my doubtful footsteps right.

Engage this frail and wav'ring heart,
Wisely to choose the better part;
To scorn the trifles of a day,
For joys that never fade away.
Then let the wildest storms arise;
Let tempests mingle earth and skies:
No fatal shipwreck shall I fear,
But all my treasures with me bear.

If thou, my Father! still art nigh,
Cheerful I live, and peaceful die;
Secure, when mortal comforts flee,
To find ten thousand worlds in thee.

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himself, he inquired of the beautiful captive, in the most civil and polite manner, concerning her country, birth, and connexions; and finding that she was betrothed to a Celtiberian prince, named Allucius, he ordered both him and the captive parents to be sent

for.

When the Spanish prince appeared in his presence, Scipio took him aside; and, to remove the anxiety he might feel on account of the young lady, addressed him in these words: “ You and I are young, which admits of my speaking to you with freedom. They who brought me your future spouse, assured me, at the same time, that you loved her with extreme tenderness; and her beauty and merit left me no room to doubt it. Upon which, I reflected, that, if I were in your situation, I should hope to meet with favor. I therefore think myself happy, in the present conjuncture, to do you a service.

" Though the fortune of war has made me your master, I desire to be your friend. Here is your wife; take her, and may you be happy! You may rest assured, that she has been amongst us, as she would have been in the house of her father and mother. Far be it from Scipio to purchase any pleasure at the expense of virtue, honor, and the happiness of an honest man! No; I have kept her for you, in order to make you a present worthy of you, and of me. The only gratitude I require of you, for this inestimable gift, is, that you will be a friend to the Roman people.”

Allucius's heart was too full to make him any answer; but, throwing himself at the general's feet, he wept aloud. The captive lady fell down in the same posture, and remained so, till the aged father, overwhelmed with transports of joy, burst into the following words: “Oh, excellent Scipio! Heaven has given thee more than human virtue. O glorious leader! O wondrous youth! what pleasure can equal that which must now fill thy heart, on hearing the prayers of this grateful virgin, for thy health and prosperity!”

Such was Scipio; a soldier, a youth, a heathen! nor was his virtue unrewarded. Allucius, charmed with such magnanimity, liberality, and politeness, returned to his own country, and published, on all occasions, the praises of his generous and humane victor; crying out, " that there was come into Spain a young hero, who conquered all things less by the force of his arms, than by the charms of his virtue, and the greatness of his beneficence.

LESSON TWENTY-FIRST.

The Happy Choice.
Beset with snares on every hand,
In life's uncertain path I stand:
Father Divine! diffuse thy light,
To guide my doubtful footsteps right.

Engage this frail and wav’ring heart,
Wisely to choose the better part;
To scorn the trifles of a day,
For joys that never fade away.

Then let the wildest storms arise;
Let tempests mingle earth and skies:
No fatal shipwreck shall I fear,
But all my treasures with me bear.

If thou, my Father! still art nigh,
Cheerful I live, and peaceful die;
Secure, when mortal comforts flee,
To find ten thousand worlds in thee.

LESSON TWENTY-SECOND.

Socrates and Lamprocles. Lamprocles, the eldest son of Socrates, fell into a violent passion with his mother. Socrates was witness to his shameful behavior, and attempted the correction of it in the following gentle and rational manner. « Come hither, son," said he, “have you never heard of men who are called ungrateful?” “Yes, frequently," answered the youth.

" And what is ingratitude?" demanded Socrates. “It is to receive a kindness,” said Lamprocles, “ without making a proper return, when there is a favorable opportunity.” “ Ingratitude is therefore a species of injustice," said Socrates. “I should think so," answered Lamprocles.

“If then," pursued Socrates, “ingratitude be injustice, doth it not follow, that the degree of it must be proportionate to the magnitude of the favors which have been received?” Lamprocles admitted the inference; and Socrates thus pursued his interrogation.

“Can there subsist higher obligations than those which children owe to their parents; from whom life is derived and supported, and by whose good offices it is rendered honorable, useful, and happy?I acknowledge the truth of what you say,” replied Lamprocles; “but who could suffer, without resentment, the ill humors of such a mother as I have?"

" What strange thing has she done to you?" said Socrates. “She has a tongue,” replied Lamprocles, s " that no mortal can bear.” “How much more," said Socrates, “has she endured from your wrangling, fretfulness, and incessant cries, in the period of infancy! What anxieties has she suffered from the levities, capriciousness, and follies of your childhood and youth! What affliction has she felt, what toil and watching has she sustained in your illness!

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