The Life of John, Duke of Marlborough: With Some Account of His Contemporaries and of the War of the Succession, Том 1

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William Blackwood and Sons, 1852
 

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His journey to Scotland and rapid rise at court
10
His important services on Monmouths rebellion
11
His endeavours to arrest the headlong course of James
12
He deserts James II on the invasion of the Prince of Orange
15
Parallel between his treachery and that of Ney
17
Honours and commands bestowed on Churchill He signs the Act of Asso ciation in favour of William
18
His efforts to obtain a settlement for the Princess Anne
19
His first services in foreign war under William
20
His short campaign in Ireland in 1690 ib 19 His services in 1691 in Flanders
21
Discreditable intrigues soon after with the exiled royal family
22
Marlborough again urges the attack of the French lines and is prevented
23
He is liberated from prison and ere long restored to favour
24
Marlboroughs operations on the field of Waterloo
25
Marlboroughs advice to march to Paris is overruled and it is resolved
27
Great difficulties Marlborough experienced in constructing the Alliance
28
At which period the Blenheim Papers commenced
29
Great power of the Bourbons at this period and general alarm which it excited
30
Vast ability by which the government of France was directed
31
enterprises
32
Hopes and schemes of the Catholic party throughout Europe at this time Their ultimate failure
33
Simultaneous attacks on the Protestants in France and England irrevocably separate the two countries
35
Efforts of William III to avert the danger
37
Manner in which the bequest of Spain to the Duke of Anjou had been obtained
38
Fresh treaty of partition between France England and Holland
39
The knowledge of this treaty of partition determines the King of Spain to the bequest in favour of the Bourbons
41
Extent of the danger which threatened the Continental powers from this accession to the power of France 42 37 Death of James II and acknowledgm...
44
Accession of Anne and her favour to Marlborough
45
Comparative strength of the forces on the opposite sides
47
CHAPTER II
48
Strange diversity in the characters drawn by historians of Louis XIV
49
Remarkable diversities and seeming contradictions of his character
50
Vast changes which he effected on France during his reign
51
Which arose from his turn of mind coinciding with the spirit of the age
52
His virtues and vices were alike those of his people
53
His government was essentially feudal and monarchical
54
Unity and centralisation were his great objects
55
His efforts to improve the public administration
56
And to give unity to general thought
57
General resemblance of his ideas of government to those of Napoleon
58
Magnificent ideas of each as shown in their public works
59
Atrocity of the revocation of the Edict of Nantes
60
Which produced the reaction against him that checked his power
61
Parallel of Napoleon and Louis XIV in the affections of the heart
62
The passion of love in both brought out the selfish feelings
63
Opposite characters of Louis XIV and William III
64
Heroic resistance of William to the French invasion
65
Adaptation of the character of William to his destiny in life
67
His policy in war which at length proved victorious ib 21 His character in private
69
Character of James II of England
70
His good and heroic qualities
71
His great battles with the Dutch
72
His great efforts to restore the navy and effects of this
73
The rashness and imprudence which cost him his throne
74
Character of Queen Anne
75
Commencement of the war in Italy under Prince Eugene His early life
76
Character of his warfare and his first great victory over the Turks
77
His campaigns in Italy and Germany
78
Commencement of the war
79
Forces on the side of France
80
Forces of the Allies
81
The weakness of England in land warfare from inexperience
82
Marlboroughs first mission to the Continent and first campaign
83
His efforts to induce the British cabinet to take their right place in the war
85
Difficulties about the appointment of a commanderinchief Marlborough is at length appointed
86
Bolingbrokes character of Marlborough
87
Marlborough prepares to attack the French at Waterloo
88
His character by Lord Chesterfield ib 41 Marlborough was really a combination of both these characters
89
His tender affection through life for the Duchess of Marlborough
90
Plan of operations for the campaign on the part of the Allies
92
And of the French ib 45 Siege and capture of Kaiserwörth
93
Boufflers attempts a coupdemain against Nimeguen which Athlone checks
94
Marlborough takes the command of the army at Nimeguen
95
Force at Marlboroughs disposal and his early difficulties in the campaign
97
Movements preparatory to the siege of Venloo
99
Description siege and fall of Venloo
101
Marlborough commences the siege of Liege
102
Siege and fall of Liege
103
Narrow escape of Marlborough from being made prisoner
104
Results of the campaign which was eminently favourable to the Allies
106
Still greater moral influence of these successes
107
CHAPTER III
109
Political causes which have divided the Flemish provinces
110
Effect of these causes in studding the Low Countries with fortified cities
112
And their effect on the system of war
113
Effect of these causes on the results of victories
114
And in leading to the formation and strength of lines of defence
115
Campaign of 1703 illustrates the value of such lines
117
But is again thwarted by the Dutch deputies
123
Alliance with the Duke of Savoy
142
Difficulties in arranging the command
149
Subsequent successes in Bavaria
155
Division of the command between Marlborough and Eugene
161
Commencement of the battle
167
Grand and decisive charge by Marlborough in the centre
174
Eugenes success on the right
175
Total rout of Tallard who is made prisoner
176
Mistake by which the French left escaped destruction
178
Capture of all the troops in Blenheim and conclusion of the battle ib 58 Results of the battle
180
Causes of the defeat of the French
182
Vast results of the victory
183
Capture of Landau and Traerbach and conclusion of the campaign
184
Its marvellous results
186
Honours and rewards bestowed on Marlborough
187
His reception at the courts of Berlin and Hanover and acquisition of Blenheim
189
CHAPTER IV
190
Backwardness of the English Parliament in voting supplies
191
Causes of this singular peculiarity
192
Bitter sense which Marlborough entertained of this parsimonious dispo sition
194
Reasons for converting the war into one of sieges and placing its seat in Flanders
195
Examples of the same necessity being felt in subsequent times
197
Extraordinary talent of Marlborough for keeping together the Alliance ib 8 Extraordinary domestic jealousy to which he was exposed
198
Extraordinary jealousy of Marlborough
199
Caution which the same cause imprinted on Marlboroughs military conduct
201
Strange fetters which the Alliance imposed on his conduct of the war
202
Vigorous efforts of the French government
203
Bold plan of Marlborough and Eugene for the invasion of France
205
Commencement of operations early in June on the Moselle
206
Successes of Villeroi over the Allies in Flanders
208
Sudden march of Marlborough to their relief
209
The disasters of the German troops in the circle of Trêves render the design abortive
210
Position occupied by Villeroi
212
Marlboroughs able plan to overreach the enemy
213
Entire success of the attack on Villerois lines
214
Obstinacy and backwardness of the Dutch prevent a complete victory
215
The Dutch deputies continue their opposition
216
152
217
The Dutch treacherously desert him
219
Marlborough is obliged to forego his advantages
225
Capture of Barcelona by Lord Peterborough
232
Universal backwardness of the Allies in the commencement of 1706
239
Marlboroughs great difficulties in arranging military operations
240
The twenty squadrons ordered up from the right restore the battle
247
And its great results
253
Siege and capture of Ostend
259
Splendid campaign of Eugene in Italy
266
His return to England and splendid reception there
286
Jealousy against him arises among both the Whigs and Tories but he pre vails at court
287
Death and character of Prince Louis of Baden
288
Great error in the subsequent policy of England
290
Great disasters experienced by France in the preceding campaign
292
Appearance of Charles XII of Sweden in Germany
293
His character
294
His great military abilities
295
His faults rashness and cruelty
296
Efforts of Louis XIV to win him to his side
297
Measures of Marlborough to counteract his efforts
298
Visit of Marlborough to Charles at Dresden
300
Singular skill with which he avoided rousing religious differences
302
His satisfactory arrangement of the difficulties regarding Poland ib 12 Renewed jealousies and procrastinations of the Allied powers
303
Defeat of the Allies at Almanza in Spain
305
Total defeat of the Allies on the French right
306
Progress of the battle in the centre and left ib 16 Victory declares at all points for the French
307
lay siege to Lille 405
308
Small force with which decisive victories have been won
309
Cause of the magnitude of this disaster
311
Way in which these disasters are to be avoided ib 20 gression of the Austrians to Naples
312
Which prevents succours being sent to the south of France
313
Forcing of the lines of Stolhoffen and irruption of the French into the Palatinate
314
Eugene
316
Opening of the campaign in Flanders
317
Secret reasons of the conduct of the Dutch on this occasion
319
Disasters of the Allies in Spain and on the Rhine
321
Marlborough in consequence strongly urges an invasion of the south of France
322
Selfish conduct of Austria which ruins the expedition ib 29 Invasion of Provence by Eugene
324
Eugene is obliged to raise the siege and retire into Italy
325
Fresh difficulties with the King of Sweden
326
A treaty is at length adjusted ib 33 Operations in Flanders
328
Marlborough again advances and the French retire to Lille
329
Marlborough closes the campaign and returns to England
330
Causes of the reaction against Marlborough and the war at this time ib 37 Change in the system of government by the Revolution
331
Vast increase of loans taxes and corruption
332
Liability of women to change of disposition and favourites
334
Dangers of this in a queen
335
Queen Annes early friendship for Marlborough
336
Real causes of Annes alienation from Marlborough
337
The Queens partiality to the Tories and the Duchesss to the Whigs
338
Which was increased by Marlboroughs absence and success in war
339
Vacillation and inconsistency in the Queen
340
Commencement of the Duchesss decline in influence at court ib 47 Dissension about Sunderlands appointment
341
Secret reasons of the keenness of both parties on this question
342
Dread of the Tories was the reason
343
Marlborough joins the Duchess in urging the appointment
344
The Queen still holds out and Marlborough still trusts Harley and St John
345
Views and language of Harley and St John at this period
346
Marlboroughs influence at length carries through the appointment
349
Continued leaning of the Queen towards the Tories
350
Which appears in her ecclesiastical preferments
351
Jealousy of the Whigs against Marlborough and Godolphin
352
Rise of Abigail Hill and her early history
353
Her great influence
354
Imprudent conduct of the Duchess at this crisis
355
Dignified but unwise conduct of Godolphin and Marlborough at this crisis
357
Reasons of its failure
358
Vehement outcry against Marlborough both in and out of Parliament
359
Speech of Marlborough against drafting men from Flanders
360
Circumstances which occasioned a suspicion of Harley
362
Godolphin breaks with Harley
363
Godolphin and Marlborough threaten to resign
364
The Queen at length yields and Harley is dismissed
365
Unexpected results of the triumph of the Whigs
366
of this
367
The Queen in court is ruled by Harley and Mrs Masham
368
Defeat of the Pretenders attempted invasion of Scotland
369
Design of the Duchess of Marlborough to retire from court
370
Flagrant ingratitude of Mrs Masham and all her relations to the Duchess of Marlborough
372
The grasping disposition of the Whigs was the real cause of the change
373
It was the Revolution which occasioned this grasping disposition in the Whigs
374
CHAPTER VI
376
Vigorous preparations made by Louis XIV for the campaign in the Low Countries
377
Preparations and forces of the Allies in Flanders
378
The Dutch are anxious for a separate peace
379
Vendômes movements to aid a revolt in Antwerp
380
Continued procrastination of the German powers
381
Vendômes able plan to aid a rising in Ghent and Bruges
383
He makes himself master of Ghent and Bruges ib 9 Marlboroughs activity secures Oudenarde against a coupdemain
385
Extreme vexation and serious illness of Marlborough
386
Marlboroughs crossmarch on Vendômes communications
387
Vendôme moves off followed by the Allies
388
Description of the field of battle
390
Dispute between Burgundy and Vendôme
391
Preliminary movements on both sides and capture of the French advanced guard
392
Forces on both sides and commencement of the battle
393
Brilliant success of the French right
394
Operations of Eugene on the right
395
And of Marlborough on the left
396
Decisive movement by Marlborough against the French left
397
Vigour with which it was executed by Overkirk who entirely turns them
398
Gallant but ineffectual efforts of Vendôme to arrest the disorder
399
Results of the battle
400
Pursuit of the enemy and humanity of Marlborough
402
Capture of the French lines and junction of Berwick with Vendôme and of Eugenes army with Marlborough
404
Advantages of Vendômes position with a view to interrupting the siege
406
Preparations of the Allies for the siege
407
Vendôme makes incursions towards Ostend and into Cadsand island
408
Which are avenged by Marlboroughs incursions into Artois
409
Boufflers takes the command at Lille Preparations for its defence
410
Great concourse of illustrious characters on both sides to witness the siege
411
Measures of Vendôme and Berwick to interrupt the convoy and prevent ib the siege
412
Commencement of the siege and position of the covering army
414
Commencement of the siege and fortifying of the camp
415
Commencement of the siege and first operations
416
Advance and junction of Vendôme and Berwick to raise the siege
417
Marlborough arrests Vendôme and Berwick when trying to raise the siege
418
Marlborough intrenches his position which Vendôme declines to attack
420
The French at length retire towards Oudenarde
421
Marlborough is prevented from fighting and follows the enemy
422
Increasing danger of Marlboroughs position
423
Assault on the 6th September which carries part of the coveredway
424
Increasing difficulties of the siege
425
Second terrible assault which partially succeeds
426
Eugenes wound throws the siege on Marlborough who delivers a fresh assault
428
Efforts on the part of the besieged to obtain supplies of ammunition
429
Extraordinary entry of a French officer into Lille by swimming
430
Marlborough writes for supplies from England by Ostend
431
Movements on both sides before the action ib 54 Action of Wynendale and passage of the convoy
432
Progress of the siege after the arrival of the convoy
434
New expedient of Vendômes met by a counter device of Marlboroughs
435
Siege of the citadel of Lille and diversion of Vendôme against Brussels
436
Marlboroughs brilliant march which defeats it
437
Losses sustained on both sides during the siege
438
Courtesy and mutual compliments after the capitulation
439
Marlboroughs anxious wish to enter France after the fall of Lille
440
Marlborough recovers Ghent
441
And Bruges concludes the campaign and again refuses the government of the Netherlands
442
Marlboroughs letter to the Duke of Berwick urging a general peace
443
Death and character of Marshal Overkirk
445
Glorious results of the campaign and great ability of Marlborough
446
His bold offensive measures and extraordinary capture of Lille
447
Great issue at stake in the siege of Lille ib APPENDIX
449

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