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More soft than rills that through the valley flow,
Or vernal gales that o'er the vi'lets blow;
He sung the tender woes of artless swains,
Their tunesul contests, and their am'rous pains,
When early spring has wak'd the breathing flow'rs,
Or winter hangs with frost the silv'ry bow'rs:
* But Colinet in ruder numbers tells
The loves of rusticks, and fair-boding spells,
Sings how they simply pass the livelong day,
And softly mourn, or innocently play.

Since them no shepherd rules th' Arcadian mead, But silent hangs Menalcas' fatal reed.

NOTE.

• See the Shepherd's Week of Gay.

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C A I S S A,

O R,

THE GAME AT CHESS, A POEM.

ADVERTISEMENT.

TH E first idea of the following piece was taken from a Latin poem of Vida, entitled Scacchia Ludus, which was translated into Italian by Marino, and inserted in the fifteenth Canto of his Adonis: the author thought it fair to make an acknowledgment in the notes for the passages, which he borrowed from those two poets; but he must also do them the justice to declare, that most of the descriptions, and the whole story of Caissa, which is written in imitation of Ovid, are his own, and their faults must be imputed to him only. The characters in the poem are no less imaginary than those in the episode; in which the invention of Chess is poetically ascribed to Mars, though it is certain that the game was originally brought from India.

C A I S S A,

O R,

THE GAME AT CHESS, A POEM.

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Written in the Year 1763.

F armies on the chequer'd sield array'd,
And guiltless war in pleasing form display'd,

IMITATIONS.

* Ludimus effigiem belli, simulataque veris
Prælia, buxo acies sictas, et ludicra regna:
Ut gemini inter se reges, albuscjue nigerque,
Pro laude oppositi certent bicoloribus armis.
Dicite, Seriades Nymphæ, certamina tanta, Vida.

When

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