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“ Within these woods I reign alone; «« The boundless forest is my own. “ Bears, wolves, and all the savage brood, 55 “ Have dy'd the regal den with blood. “ These carcasses on either hand, «. Those bones that whiten all the land, “ My former deeds and triumphs tell, " Beneath these jaws what numbers fell."

True,” says the Man, “ the strength I saw “ Might well the brutal nation awe; “ But shall a monarch, brave, like you, “ Place glory in so false a view? • Robbers invade their neighbour's right.

65 “ Be lov'd; let justice bound your might. • « Mean are ambitious heroes' boasts

“ Of wasted lands and flaughter'd hosts. “ Pirates their power by murders gain; “ Wife kings by love and mercy reign.

70 To me your clemency hath shown # The virtue worthy of a throne. “ Heaven gives you power above the rest, “ Like Heaven, to succour the distreft.'

The case is plain,” the monarch said; 75 “ False glory hath my youth misled; (“. For beasts of prey, a servile train, “ Have been the flatterers of my reign. ". You reason well. Yet tell me, friend, Did ever you in courts attend ?

80 “ For all my fawning rogues agree, « That human heroes rule like me." Vol. XXXVII. D

FABLE

F A B L E II.

THE SPANIEL

AND THE CAMELEON

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SPANIEL, bred with all the care

That waits upon a favourite heir,
Ne'er felt Correction's rigid hand;
Indulg'd to disobey command,
In pamper'd ease his hours were spent : s
He never knew what learning meant,
Such forward airs, so pert, so smart,
Were sure to win his lady's heart;
Each little mischief gain’d him praise ;
How pretty were his fawning ways !

The wind was south, the morning fair,
He ventures forth to take the air:
He
ranges

all the meadow round,
And rolls upon the softest ground;
When near him a Cameleon feen,
Was scarce distinguish'd from the green.

“ Dear emblem of the flattering hoft,
" What, live with clowns ! a genius loft!
“ To cities and the court repair ;
« A fortune cannot fail thee there :

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« Preferments shall thy talents crown;
“ Believe me, Friend; I know the Town."

“ Sir," says the Sycophant, “ like you, “ Of old, politer life I knew :

«.Like

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Like you, a courtier born and bred,
Kings lean’d their ear to what I said.

My whisper always met success;
“ The ladies prais'd me for address.
" I knew to hit each courtier's passion,
“ And flatter'd every vice in fashion.
“ But Jove, who hates the liar's ways,
“ At once cut short my prosperous days,
« And, fentenc'd to retain any nature,
“ Transform’d me to this crawling creature.
« Doom'd to a life obfcure and mean,
" I wander in the sylvan scene :
«« For Jove the heart alone regards ;
“ He punishes what man rewards.
“ How different is thy cafe and mine !
" With men at least you sup and dine ;
«« While I, condemn'd to thinnest fare,
“ Like those I flatter'd, feed on air."

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F A B L E III.

THE MOTHER, THE NURSE, AND THE FAIRY.

G'VE me a son. The blefling sent,

Were ever parents more content? How partial are their doting eyes! No child is half so fair and wise.

Wak'd to the morning's pleasing care, The mother rose, and fought her heir.

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She

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She saw the Nurse like one poffeft,
With wringing hands and fobbing breaft.

« Sure fome disaster has befell!
Speak, Nurse; I hope the boy is well.”

Dear Madam, think not me to blame;
Invisibly the Fairy came:
Your precious babe is hence convey'!,
And in the place a changeling laid.
Where are the father's mouth and nose ?
The mother's eyes, as black as floes?
See, here, a hocking aukward creature,
That speaks a fool in every feature !"

“ The woman's blind, the mother cries; I see wit sparkle in his eyes.”

Lord! Madam, what a squinting leer!
No doubt the Fairy hath been here."

Just as she spoke, a pigmy sprite
Pops through the key-hole swift as light;
Perch'd on the cradie's top he stands,
And thus her folly reprimands.

“ Whence sprung the vain conceited lye,
That we the world with fools supply?
What! give our sprightly race away
For the dull helpless fons of clay!
Besides, by partial fondness shown,
Like

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upon our own. Where yet was ever found a Mother Who'd give her booby for another ? . And, should we change with human breed, Well might we pass for fools indeed.”

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you, we

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FABLE

E ABLE

IV.

THE EAGLE AND THE ASSEMBLY OF ANIMALS.

IO

AS

S Jupiter's all-seeing eye

Survey'd the worlds beneath the sky,
From this small speck of earth were sent
Murmurs and sounds of discontent;
For every thing alive complain'd,

5 That he the hardeft life sustain'd.

Jove calls his Eagle. At the word,
Before him stands the royal bird.
The bird, obedient, from Heaven's height,
Downward directs his rapid fight;
Then cited every living thing,
To hear the mandates of his king.

Ungrateful creatures! whence arise
These murmurs which offend the skies?
Why this disorder ? say the cause;

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For just are Jove's eternal laws.
Let each his discontent reveal;
To yon' four Dog I first appeal."

“ Hard is my lot, the Hound replies ;
On what fleet nerves the Greyhound Aies !
While I, with weary step and flow,
O'er plains, and vales, and mountains, go.
The morning fees my chace begun,
Nur ends it till the setting fun.”

" When

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