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« Led by their doughty gen'ral's skill
" From frith to frith, from hill to hill.

“ Is thus thy haughty promise paid
"That to the Chevalier was made,
“ When thou didst oaths and duty barter
" For dukedom, gen'ralship, and garter?
" Three moons thy Jemmy shall command
“With Highland sceptre in his hand,
"Too good for his pretended birth,-
“ Then down shall fall the King of Perth.

“ 'Tis so decreed; for George shall reign, " And traitors be forfworn in vain; “ Heav'n shall for ever on him smile, “ And bless him still with an Argyle; “ While thou pursu'd by vengeful foes, “ Condemn'd to barren rocks and snows, " And hinder'd passing Inverlocky, " Shall burn thy clan and curse poor Jocky.”

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84

EPISTLES.

TO THE SUPPOSED

AUTHOR OF THE SPECTATOR.

IN

courts licentious and a shameless stage How long the war shall wit with virtue wage? Enchanted by this prostituted fair Our youth run headlong in the fatal snare, In height of rapture clasp unheeded pains, 5 And suck pollution thro' their tingling veins.

Thyfpotless thoughts unfhock'd the priest may hear, And the pure Vestal in her bosom wear. To conscious blushes and diminish'd pride Thy glass betrays what treach'rous love would hide; Nor harsh thy precepts, but infus'd by stealth, Pleas'd while they cure and cheat us into health. Thy works in Chloe's toilet gain a part, And with his tailor share the foppling's heart. Laih'd in thy fatire the penurious Cit

15 Laughs at himself and finds no harm in wit. From felon gamesters the raw squire is free, And Britain owes her rescu'd oaks to thee. His miss the frolick Viscount dreads to toast, Or his third cure the shallow Templar boast;

K

II

And the rafh fool who scorn'd the beaten road
Dares quake at thunder and confess his God.

The brainless stripling who expell’d the Town
Damn’d the stiff college and pedantick gown,
Aw'd by thy name is dumb, and thrice a-week

25 Spells uncouth Latin and pretends to Greek. A faunt'ring tribe! such born to wide estates With Yea and No in senates hold debates; At length despis'd each to his fields retires, First with the dogs, and king amidst the squires; 30 From pert to stupid finks supinely down, In youth a coxcomb and in age a clown.

Such readers scorn'd, thou wingst thy daring Aight Above the stars and treadft the fields of light: Fame heav'n and hell are thy exalted theme, 35 And visions such as Jove himself might dream; Man sunk to flavery tho'to glory born, Heav'n's pride when upright, and deprav'd his scorn,

Such hints alone could British Virgil lend, And thou alone deserve from such a friend : 40 A debt fo borrow'd is illustrious shame, And fame when shar'd with him is double fame. So flush'd with sweets by Beauty's queen bestow'd With more than mortal charms Æneas glow'd; Such gen'rous strifes Eugene and Marlb'rough try, And as in glory so in friendship vie.

Permit these Lines by thee to live-nor blanc A Muse that pants and languishes for fanie,

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That fears to fink when humbler themes she sings,
Loft in the mass of mean forgotten things.

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Receiv'd by thee I prophesy my Rhymes
The praise of virgins in succeeding times:
Mix'd with thy works their life no bounds shall see,
But stand protected as inspir’d by thee.

So fome weak shoot which else would poorly rise
Jove's tree adopts, and lifts him to the skies;
Thro' the new pupil foft'ring juices flow,
Thrust forth the gems and give the flow'rs to blow;
Aloft, immortal reigns the plant unknown
With borrow'd life and vigour not his own.

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1

TO MR. ADDISON,

ON HIS OPERAOF ROSAMOND.

Ne furte pudori
“ Sitti5i Mufa lyræ folurs, & cantor Apollo."

The Opera firit Italian matters taught,
Enrich'd with songs, but innocent of thought :
Britannia's learned theatre disdains
Melodious trifies and enervate strains,
And blushes on her injur'd fage to see
Nonsense well tun'd and sweet Itupidity.

No charms are wanting to thy artfal song,
Soft as Corelli and as Virgil strong:

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From words so sweet new grace the notes receive,
And Musick borrows helps she us'd to give.
Thy style hath match'd what ancient Romans knew,
Thy flowing numbers far excel the new,
'Their cadence in such easy found convey'd
The height of thought may seem superi’ous aid;
Yet in such charms the noble thoughts abound IS
That needlefs seem the sweets of ealy sound.

Landscapes how gay the bow'ry grotto yields
Which Thought creates and lavish Fancy builds!
What art can trace the visionary scenes,
The fiow'ry groves and everlasting greens,
The babbling sounds that mimick Echo plays,
'The Fairy fade and its eternal maze?
Nature and Art in all their charms combin'd,
And all Elysium to one view confin'd!
No further could imagination roam

25 TillVanbrugfram’dand Marlb'rough rais’dthe dome.

Ten thousand pangs my anxious bofom tear. When drown'd in tears I see th' imploring fair; When bards less soft the moving words supply, A seeming justice dooms the nymph to die: 30 But here she begs, nor can fhe beg in vain, (In dirges thus expiring swans complain ;) Each verse so swells expressive of her woes, And ev'ry tear in lines so mournful flows, We spite of fame her fate revers'd believe,

35 O'erlook her crimes, and think she ought to live.

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