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POETICAL WORKS

OF

THOMAS TICKELL.

WITH THE LIFE OF THE AUTHOR.

Permit these Lines by thee iulivenor blame
A Mule that pants and languifhes for fime,
That fears to link when humbler themes the sings,
Loft in the inars of mean forgotten things.
Recciv'd by thce I prophefy my Rhymes
The praise of virgins in fucceeding times:
Mix'd with thy works their life no bounds shall see,
But ftand protected as inspir'd by thee.

TO SUPPOSED AUTHOT SPT

EDINBURG:
AT THE Apoilo Poets, by THE MARTINS.

Anno 1781.

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Why praise we, prodigal of fame,
The rage that sets the world on flame?
My guiltless Mufe his brow fhall bind
Whose godlike bounty spares-mankind. ODE TO SUNDERLAND,
Simple I, and innocent of art,
The tale that footh'd my infant years impart,
The tale I heard whole winter-eves untirid,
And fing the battles that my nurse infpir'd. KENS.GARDEN,
By Nature fitted for an humble theme,
A painter prorpect or a murm'ring stream,
To tune a vulgar note in Echo's praibe,
Whilft Echo's fulf resounds the flatt'ring, laye,
Or whilft I tell how Myra's charms furprife
Paint roses on her cheeks and funs within her eyes. . OXFOR,

EDINBURG:
AT THE Apollo Puess, BY THE MARTINS.

Anno 1781.

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THOMAS TICKELL.

This gentleman, well known to the world by the friendship and intimacy which sublisted between hini and Mr. Addison, was the son of the Rev. Richard Tickell, and was born in 1686 at Bridekirk in Cumberland. In 1701 he was sent to Queen's College Ox+ ford, in 1708 he was made Master of Arts, and in 1710 was chosen Fellow, for which, as he did not comply with the statutes by taking orders, he obtained a dif penfation from the Crown. In the 1726 he married at Dublin, and in that year vacated his Fellowship.

While he was at the university he wrote fome beautiful verses addressed to Mr. Addison on his opera of Rofamond, which so effectually recommended him to that gentleman that he held hii in esteem ever afterwards. He produced another piece of the sanie kind on Cato, but not with equal happiness.

When Mr. Addison went into Ireland as Secretary to Lord Sunderland he carried Tickell with him and employed him in business; and when he afterwards in the 1777 roseto be Secretary of State he conferred the place of Undersecretary on Mr. Tickell. On Mr. Addison's resigning the Secretaryship, Mr. Craggs who succeeded him continued Tickell in his place, which he held till that gentleman's death.

Mr. Addison being a diffident man consulted with

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