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Forego your claim; no more pretend;
Intemp’rance is esteem'd a friend;
He shares their mirth their social joys,
And as a courted guest destroys.
The charge on him must justly fall
Who finds employment for you all.

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FABLE XLVIII.

THE GARDENER AND THE HOG.

A GARD’NER of peculiar taste
On a young Hog his favour plac'd,
Who fed not with the common herd;
His tray was to the hall preferr'd.
He wallow'd underneath the board,
Or in his master's chamber snor'd,
Who fondly strok'd him ev'ry day,
And taught bim all the puppy's play.
Where'er he went, the grunting friend
Ne'er fail'd his pleasure to attend.

As on a time the loving pair
Walk'd forth to tend the garden's care,
The Master thus address'd the Swine:

My house, my garden, all is thine.
On turnips feast whene'er you please,
And riot in my beans and pease;
If the potatoe's taste delights,
Or the red carrot's sweet invites,

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Indulge thy morn and ev’ning hours,
But let due care regard my flow'rs:
My tulips are my garden's pride :
What vast expence those beds surply'd !

The Hog by chance one morning roam'd,
Where with new ale the vessels foam'd:
He munches now the streaming grains,
Now with full swill the liquor drains.
Intoxicating fumes arise;
He reels, he roils his winking eyes ;
Ther: stagg'ring through the garden scours,
And treads down painted ranks of flow'rs.
With delving snout he turns the soil,
And cools his palate with the spoil.

The Master came, the ruin spy'd;
Villain! suspend thy rage, he cry'd!
Hast thou, thou most ungrateful sot,
My charge, my only charge, forgot?
What, all my flow'rs! no more he said,
But gaz’d, and sigh’d, and hung his head.

The Hog, with fluit'ring speech returns :
Explain, Sir, why your anger burns.
See there, untouch'd, your tulips strcwn,
For I devour'd the roots alone.

At this the Gard'ner's passion grows;
From oaths and threats he fell to blows:
The stubborn brute the blows sustains,
Assaults his leg, and tears the veins,
Volume III,

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Ah! foolish Swain! too late you find
That sties were for such friends design'd!

Homeward he limps with painful pace,
Reflecting thus on past disgrace;
Who cherishes a brutal mate,
Shail mourn the folly soon or late.

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FABLE XLIX.

THE MAY AND THE FLEA.

Whether on earth, in air, or main,
Sure evry thing alive is vain!

Does not the hawk all fowls survey,
As destined only for his prey ?
And do not tyrants, prouder things,
Think men were born for slaves to kings?

When the crab views the pearly stands,
Or Tagus, bright with golden sands,
Or crawls beside the coral grove,
And hears the ocean roll above,
Nature is too profuse, says he,
Who
gave

all these to pleasure me!
When bord’ring pinks and roses bloom,
And ev'ry garden breathes perlume;
When peaches glow with sunny dyes,
Like Laura's cheek when blushes rise;
When with huge figs the branchesbend,
When clusters from the vine depend,

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The snail looks round on flow'r and tree,
And cries, All these were made for me!

What dignity's in human nature!
Says Man, the most conceited creature,
As from a cliff he cast his eye,
And view'd the sea and arched sky.
The sun was sunk beneath the main;
The moon and all the starry train
Hung the vast vault of heav'n. The man
His contemplation thus began:

When I behold this glorious show,
And the wide wat'ry world below,
The scaly people of the main,
The beasts that range the wood or plain,
The wing'd inhabitants of air,
The day, the night, the various year,
And know all these by Heav’n design'd
As gifts to pleasure humankind,
I cannot raise iny worth too high;
of what vast consequence am I!

Not of th' importance you suppose,
Replies a Flea upon his nose:
Be humble, learn thyself to scan;
Know, pride was never made for man.
'Tis vanity that swells thy mind.
Wlai, heav'n and earth for thee design'd!
For thee, made only for our need,
That more important Fleas might feed.
Gay.)

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FABLE L.

THE HARE AND MANY FRIENDS.

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Friendsuip, like love, is but a name,
Unless to one you stint the flame.
The child whom many fachers share,
Hath seldom known a father's care.
'Tis thus in friendships; who dependi
On many, rarely find a friend..

A Hare, who, in, a.civil way,
Comply'd with ev'ry thing, like GAY,
Was known by all the bestial train
Who haunt the wood or graze the plain ;
Her care was never to offend,
And ev'ry creature was her friend.

As forth she went at early dawn,
To taste the dew-besprinkled lawn,
Behind she hears the hunter's, cries,
And from the deep-mouih'd thunder flies.
She starts, she stops, she pants for breatha
She hears the near advance of death;
She doubles, to mislead the hound,
And measures back her mazy round,
Till, fainting in the public way,
Half-dead wish fear she gasping lay,

What transport in her bosom grew,
When first the Horse appear'd in view!

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