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CONTENTS.

BOOK IV.

Canto VI.

Canto VII.

Canto VIII,

Canto IX.

Canto X...

Canto XI..

Canto XII.

Page

5

22

38

60

74

94

112

BOOK V.

The Legend of Artegall, or of Justice..

Canto I.

Canto II.

Canto III.

Canto IV

Canto V.

Canto VI.

Canto VII.

Canto VIII.

Canto IX.

Canto X...

124

128

139

158

172

190

210

221

210

253

275

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THE

FOURTH BOOK

OR

THE FAERIE QUEENE.

CANTO VI.

Both Scadamour and Arthegall

Doe fight with Britomart:
He sees her face; doth fall in love,

And soone from her depart.

1. What equall torment to the griefe of mind And pyning anguish hid in gentle hart, That inly feeds itselfe with thoughts unkind, And nourisheth her owne consuming smart! What medicine can any leaches art Yeeld such a sore, that doth her grievance hide, And will to none her maladie impart! Such was the wound that Scudamour did gride; For which Dan Phebus selfe cannot a salve pro

vide. VOL. IV,

B

II.

did ride,

Who having left that restlesse House of Care,
The next day, as he on his way
Full of melancholie and sad misfare
Through misconceipt, all unawares espide
An armed Knight under a forrest side
Sitting in shade beside his grazing steede;
Who, soone as them approaching he descride,
Gan towards them to pricke with eger speede,
That seem'd he was full bent to some mischiévous
deede.

III.
Which Scudamour perceiving forth issewed
To have rencountred him in equall race;
But, soone as th' other nigh approaching vewed
The armes he bore, his

speare

he

gan abase And voide his course; at which so suddain case He wondred much: but th' other thus can say; “ Ah! gentle Scudamour, unto your grace I me submit, and you of pardon pray, That almost had against you trespassed this day."

IV.

Whereto thus Scudamour; “ Small harme it were
For any Knight upon a ventrous Knight
Without displeasance for to prove his spere.
But reade you, Sir, sith ye my name have hight,
What is your owne, that I mote you requite."

Certes," sayd he, “ye mote as now excuse
Me from discovering you my name aright:
For time yet serves that I the same refuse;
But call ye me the Salvage Knight, as others use.”

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“ Then this, Sir Salvage Knight,” quoth he,

“ areede;
Or doe you here within this forrest wonne,
That seemeth well to answere to your weede,
Or have

ye

it for some occasion donne ? That rather seemes, sith knowen

armes

ye

shonne.” “ This other day," sayd he," a stranger Knight Shame and dishonour hath unto me donne; On whom I waite to wreake that foule despight, Whenever he this way shall passe by day or night.”

VI. “Shame be his meede,” quoth he, “that meaneth

shame! But what is he by whom ye

shamed were ?" "A stranger Knight,” sayd he, “unknowne by

name,
But knowne by fame, and by an hebene speare
With which he all that met him downe did beare.
He, in an open turney lately held,
Fro me the honour of that game did reare;
And having me, all wearie earst, downe feld,
The fayrest Ladie reft, and ever since withheld.”

VII.
When Scudamour heard mention of that

speare,
He wist right well that it was Britomart,
The which from him his fairest Love did beare.
Tho gan he swell in every inner part
For fell despight, and gnaw his gealous hart,
That thus he sharply sayd; “ Now by my head,
Yet is not this the first unknightly part,
Which that same Knight, whom by his launce I
read,

[him dread: Hath doen to noble Knights, that many makes

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