Lord Byron's Life in Italy

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University of Delaware Press, 2005 - 700 страници
Lord Byron's Life in Italy is an English translation of Vie de Lord Byron en Italie by Byron's Italian friend Teresa Guiccioli, the manuscript of which has lain in Ravenna since the early 1880s, and which has never-been published, or even read except by a small number of scholars. Teresa Guiccioli was the poet's last mistress, his liaison with whom was of longer duration than any other. They met in 1819, and their relationship lasted until he left Italy for Greece in 1823. Persecuted by the authorities because of the friendship with such a dangerous man, Teresa's family had to move from Ravenna to Pisa and finally to Genoa. Teresa knew Byron better, probably, than any other person, and her fresh and original account of his life has been unknown for too long. This superb translation, with elaborate introduction and notes, fills a long-acknowledged gap in studies of Byron. Michael Rees is a past joint chair of the Byron Society. Peter Cochran is the editor of the Newstead Abbey Byron Society Review.

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Съдържание

INTRODUCTION
1
Translators Notes
52
The Manuscript
54
Editorial Notes
58
Chronology
61
Lord Byron in England
67
Lord Byron in Switzerland
72
ii A Hostess of Genius
75
Lord Byron Alone in Ravenna Again
323
ii No Return for the Exiles
326
iii Forbearance with Servants
330
iv Shelleys Reputation
333
v Malaria and Melancholy
336
Lord Byrons Last Weeks in Ravenna
340
ii A Widening Rift
343
iii Gifford and the Dramas
348

iii Swiss and English Rebuffs
79
iv Manfred in the Alps
82
Lord Byron in Italy Milan
86
Lord Byron in Venice
89
ii Isle of Armenians
92
iii In High Society
95
Lord Byron in Rome and La Mira
97
Lord Byron at Palazzo Mocenigo
101
ii Relief for the Destitute
104
iii Antics of a Housekeeper
107
iv Honor and Desolation
109
v The Satirical Vein
111
vi Easy Pleasures of Youth
114
vii Escape from Dantes Wood
116
Lord Byron and Countess Guiccioli
120
ii Mystic Feelings of Sympathy
123
iii Knitting Closer Bonds
126
iv Anguish at the Opera
129
v Bleakness of Separation
131
vi Plotting and Jealousy
133
vii Steadfast through Delays
135
viii From Ferrara to Bologna
138
Lord Byron in Ravenna
142
ii Sacrifice of the Heart
145
iii Pine Woods and Poetry
148
iv The Raptures of Recovery
151
v Prudery and Slander
154
vi Provincial Prejudice
158
vii Martyr to Love
160
viii Consoling Invitations
162
Lord Byron in Bologna
164
ii The Message in a Book
167
iii Transactions with the Count
170
Lord Byron in Arqua and Padua
173
ii Poetic Musings
176
iii Surprises at the Inn
179
Lord Byron in La Mira
183
ii The Gambas Misgivings
185
iii A Brother Confined
188
iv The Disastrous Marriage
190
v Moore and the Memoirs
193
vi Pulci and Tales of Outrage
196
Lord Byron in Venice again
200
ii The Error Unmasked
203
iii Farewell to the Enchantress
206
Lord Byron back in Ravenna
209
ii The Quiet and Simple Life
212
iii Disputes with the Count
214
iv Stirrings for Liberty
217
v Talk of Separation
219
vi Petition to the Pontiff
222
vii A Noble and Generous Part
225
Lord Byron after the Separation
232
ii Terrifying Mirror of the Truth
235
iii Talent Tenderness and Love
239
Lord Byron at Filetto
242
ii Eclipse of the Sun
244
iii Patriots and Bigots
246
Lord Byrons Second Ravenna Winter
251
ii The Abortive Editor
253
iii A Dreary Anniversary
256
iv Literature and the Countess
259
v The Origins of Myrrha
261
Lord Byron and the Carbonari
265
ii The Sigh of Ages
268
iii Relying upon Naples
272
iv Letter from a Volunteer
275
v Scoundrels at the Heel of the Boot
277
Lord Byron and the Exiles
281
ii The Reported Hissing
283
iii A Different Style of Drama
285
iv Double Assault on Don Juan
288
v The Storm Breaks
291
vi Comfort from the Banished
295
vii Pressure on the Countess
297
viii The Reluctant Parting
299
Lord Byron Alone in Ravenna
302
ii Anxious Imaginings
305
iii Doubts about Destination
307
iv Romagna and Geneva Rejected
310
Lord Byron in Ravenna with Shelley
314
ii Differing Views of Poetry
317
iii The Stamp of Immortality
320
iv Rogers and Lord Clare
352
Lord Byron in Pisa
358
ii Medwins Conversations
362
iii Trelawny and Hunt
367
Lord Byron in Pisa with Shelley
371
ii Shelleys Two Marriages
375
iii The Poets Contrasted
379
iv Private Theatricals
383
v The Bartolini Bust
386
Lord Byron and Cain
391
ii Temporary Rupture
394
iii The Critics Onslaught
398
iv The Reaction of Friends
401
v Southeys Rancor
405
vi Macaulay on Southey
410
Lord Byron and Don Juan
414
ii Dictated by a Sprite
417
iii Grappling with Cant
421
iv Dazzling Redress from Abroad
424
Lord Byron and the Pisan Affray
429
ii Attempted Revenge
431
iii Official Investigation
435
Lord Byron in Pisa Leghorn and Montenero
439
ii Tribute from America
444
iii Mediterranean Moonlight
449
iv First Thoughts of Biography
454
v Outburst from a Servant
457
vi A Tissue of Perversity
460
vii The Journalist Installed
462
Lord Byron back in Pisa
466
ii A Name not Mentioned
469
iii Forebodings of Doom
471
iv Engulfed by the Sea
475
v Obsequies on the Beach
478
Lord Byrons Last Days in Pisa
483
ii Compensation from Hobhouse
486
iii Illness and Earthquake
490
Lord Byrons Arrival in Genoa
493
ii Two Visions of Judgement
496
iii Shelleys Orphan
499
iv Lord Byron in Retrospect
501
v Hunt the MischiefMaker
503
vi Mrs Shelley Undeceived
506
Lord Byron in Genoa
511
ii Masquerade and Sobriety
514
iii The Indignant Muse
517
iv Spurning the Snuffbox
525
Lord Byron and Lady Blessington
528
ii Adelines Infatuation
531
iii A Reunion Proposed
534
iv The Farewell Dinner
538
v Imaginary Conversations
540
Lord Byrons Dilemmas
546
ii Escape from Ingratitude
548
Lord Byrons Resolve to Leave for Greece
552
ii Ambition for Virtue
556
iii The Committees Invitation
559
iv Military Prospects31
564
v Agonies of Anticipation
568
vi That Fatal Day
575
Lord Byron the Hero
579
Selected Letters of Teresa Guiccioli to Byron
581
INTRODUCTION pages 358 Lamartines Teresa Guiccioli
610
Chapter 1 Shelleys two letters to TG see her pages 234 5730 and 5780
612
Chapter 12 The Papal Rescript granting TGs first separation see translation at her page 3410
615
Chapter 12 Cardinal Rusconis letter to TG see translation at her page 3413
616
Chapter 12 TGs second separation see her page 3427
617
Chapter 15 Bulwer Lytton on Myrrha see TGs 4529
625
Chapter 17 Byrons letter to Cardinal Rusconi June 25 1821 see TGs 4606
626
Chapter 17 Michele Leonis letters to Byron see TGs note on her page 4608
631
Chapter 17 Niccolinis Life of Byron see TGs note to her page 4627
635
Chapter 17 Italian text of a letter from Ruggiero Gamba to TG July 11 1821 translation at page 4650 and the Italian text of letter from B to Ruggiero ...
637
Chapter 20 The Duchess of Devonshires letter to B see TGs page 5788
639
Chapter 27 Leigh Hunts description of TG see TGs page 71206
640
Chapter 29 The Pisan diary of John Cam Hobhouse September 1521 1822 edited from BL Add Mss 56546 ff 105vl 14r See TGs pages 7130911
642
Chapter 32 Byrons letter to Lady Byron November 17 1821 see TGs page 81474
650
Chapter 34 More from Byrons letters to Bowring see TGs page 91512 part of the interpolated section just before the continuation of page 91576
651
TGs affair with Henry Fox from The Journal of the Hon Henry Edward Fox afterwards fourth and last Lord Holland 18181830 edited by the Earl of ...
653
TGS Letter to John Murray HI
657
Selected Bibliography
665
Index
669
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