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fidence, and by perseverance the most refractory | returned at full speed to Kars, found the may be overcome. A horse when first encum- treacherous merchant quietly smoking his chibered with harness, if immediately attached to a bouque in the caravanserai, furiously accused, vehicle, is astonished, when required to move, deprived him of the brilliants which he had at finding a pressure on his shoulders which he unjustly obtained, beat bim severely with brihas never previously experienced. He discovers dles, belts, and pipe-sticks, with the full and another novel apparatus of confinement; he is, unqualified approbation of the bystanders, and in fact, trammelled and endeavours to escape; finally only abstained from dragging him before probably he plunges, kicks, or rears, and be the Cadi from the fear that the signalement of comes difficult to manage ; but by the simple some of the party might be unpleasantly faprocess just recommended, all that is obviated. miliar to the inyrmidons of the magistrates of Hints on Training, by Cecil, in the Sporting Kars. Having thus regained possession of the Review.

brilliants, they hastened on towards Teheran. Set A Thief TO CATCH A Thief.-Some * A fresh plan was soon formed, and eight years ago, the diamonds of the Austrian Dindar Aghar mounted his horse, without heedambassadress were stolen from her toilette table ing either his aching bones or the jeers and by some peculiarly cunning and daring thieves. curses of the other inmates of the khan, who A large reward was offered for the recovery of regarded him as a not only dishonest trader, but the gems, and Dindar was deputed by his supe- far worse—as a detected impostor. He rode as riors to the office of a detective in this parti- fast as possible on the road towards Persia, until cular case. In the course of a week, Dindar, his horse, knocked up by two hard days' trawhose scent no Border bloodhound ever sur- velling over stony ground, became too lame to passed, got a clue to the originators of the rob- proceed. Dindar, who was as good a judge of bery. The plunderers were numerous, and as the equine race and as adroit a haggler as the the jewels could not be sold without great risk canniest native of Yorkshire, purchased a strong of detection in Constantinople, they had resolved shaggy yaboo from a peasant for a trifle, and to carry them for sale to Teheran, where they pursued his journey. Pushing on unremitingly, had no doubt of finding a ready market for and seeking a little frequented pass in the moun. their valuable booty among the nobles of Persia. tain range, Dindar had the gratification of arDindar Agha found out their intended route, riving before the robbers among the wideand on the arrival of the rascals at Kars, a re- spreading plains of Persia. It was some spectable merchant from Koordistan, in a high time before he encountered a band fit for his cap of black sheepskin and a huge robe, entered purpose; the Koords were too savage and their caravanserai, and very dexterously ma- treacherous, the Uzbecks too fierce and morose, naged to extract from them, in the course of the Eelyauts too pastoral and gentle to be the conversation, an avowal that they had diamonds allies of this Candiote Ulysses. At last he ar. fur sale. For these the pretended merchant, rived among the black tents and picketed camels who was no other than our old friend Dindar, of a tribe of Turcomans-a people brave, hosoffered to give a handsome price, and thus save pitable, and faithful, but with exceedingly them the trouble of continuing their journey to mediæval ideas of the rights of property. To the capital of the Shah. After a great deal of the chieftain of this horde, Sultaun Moorad, bargaining, the robbers agreed to sell the jewels Dindar told a plaintive tale of wrong and viofor ninety thousand piastres, or nine hundred lence. He had been cheated out of the price of pounds sterling, and with apparent reluctance a set of superb jewels, which he had sold to and hesitation the merchant produced a heavy some Kafirs of merchants at Kars. The unbeleathern bag and counted out the sum in silver lieving dogs, rank Sheahs and heretics, as well beschliks. "The money was some fictitious coin as swindlers (Sultaun Moorad was a Sounie), manufactured by a gang of forgers in England had taken away the money they had paid him or Russia, and which had been seized by the for the diamonds by force, after he had given his Vizier and confiscated. The wily Dindar had receipt, and when he complained at the footprovided himself with a large supply of this stool of justice, the Cadi of Kars-that son of counterfeit money, and was thus enabled to a burnt father and grandsire of asses - had purchase the gems of the Baroness von taken a bribe from the thieves to apply the for a few handfuls of clipped pewter. The rob- bamboo to Dindar, and to drive him with blows bers left Kars joyfully on their homeward route. from the court--him an old man and a MussulAt their first haiting-place, however, some of man! Whereupon there had remained no other the more wary began to suspect the accommo. resource to the ill-treated and disconsolate Dindating merchant who had so opportunely inter-dar than to prostrate himself in the dust of the posed to save them the weary ride to Teheran. Turcoman encampment, to grasp the spear of Perhaps Dindar, aware of the worthlessness of the chief, to kiss the hem of his robe, and to his circulating medium, was too eager and too adjure the brave and victorious Sultaun Moorad, compliant in bargaining to suit his feigned cha- before whom the universe trembled, to put him. racter of a greedy trader. At any rate, the self at the head of his lion-eating warriors, and thieves examined the contents of the money surprise the robbers on their road to Teheran. bag, and discovered the beschliks to be spurious Dindar added, that besides the diamonds the imitations, even greasier and more adulterated rascals had above ninety thousand piastres in than the Sultan's shabby coin. The gang silver in their possession, and that he should be

content with the restitution of the gems, leaving tricate passes of the mountains into the open the money to his valiant ally, whom he finally plains, they were charged by an overwhelming implored, by the beard of his father and the salt force of Turcoman cavalry.. Half of their numof his hospitality, to protect and avenge him. ber fell beneath the scimitars and lances of The Turcoman chief sympathized with the Sultaun Moorad and his followers, and the sur

ged and injured Dindar, and his eyes vivors, having been stripped and plundered, sparkled at the mention of the piastres. He were detained in a state of slavery among the agreed to punish Dindar's enemies, and to re- wild horde. As for Dindar, the chief kept his store him the gems, and forthwith plucked his word most faithfully. The diamonds were given spear from the ground where it was planted be- up to the wily Cretan, who returned forthwith to fore his tent, mounted his steed, which had Constantinople, restored the jewels to the borne himon many a day of battle and chappow, Baroness von — and duly claimed and reand called around him his young men, who ceived the reward. The Turcoman chief was mastered gladly at the first announcement of a content with the counterfeit coin.—“Stamforay. To the astonishment and dismay of the boul ;by the author of The Bridal and the Stamboul thieves, as they emerged from the in- Bridle.

LI T E R A T U R E Woman's RECORD; OR, SKETCHES_Of other mistakes we find Mrs. Opie is reported to ALL DISTINGUISHED WOMEN, FROM “The have died in 1849 ; whereas this venerable and BEGINNING” UNTIL 1850. By Sarah Josepha highly-esteemed lady is still alive. Lady EmmeHale, Editor of "The Lady's Book ;” author of line Stuart Wortley is called a wife, when, " Traits of American Life, &c., &c.—(Samp- unhappily, she has been a widow for years. son Low & Co.-Mrs. Hale, as many of our Lady Eastlake is still mentioned only as Miss readers may be aware, is an American authoress Rigby; Mrs. Loudon is written of in entire igof very considerable repute; and assuredly the norance of her true literary position. In fact, eight-hundred-and-odd pages of letter-press we have found so mnany blunders, which we which are here presented to the reader stamp know of our own knowledge to be such, that her as one of the most industrious of literary naturally our faith is weakened with regard to labourers. We should say this, had her whole those “lives ” of which we are more ignorant. life been consumed in the task, instead of, as Then there are many noticeable omissions ; she tells us, three years. In truth, we wish she while people of such small account, that we will had bestowed more time, and corrected many venture to say the world in general has never inaccuracies which have crept in. Critics are heard of them before, are here dragged forth and allosed to have “ hearts of stone" in the matter exhibited - like infusoria under a microscopeof fault-finding ; but really it is with a sort of certain women of genius, whose writings are compunction we point out flaws in the execution influencing opinion or forming a taste, are altoof this stupendous undertaking. There is gether ignored. For instance, there is no mensomething in the mere title that almost takes tion of Geraldine Jewsbury, of Miss Mulock one's breath away—“all distinguished women (author of "The Head of the Family”), or the from the beginning !" even from Eve to the author of " Margaret Maitland," — three nonotabilities of to-day! What one human mind velists surely of sufficient note.

Nor is Lady could be comprehensive enough to grasp such a Duff Gordon included, or poor Louisa Sheridan, subject, even if devoting to it an entire life and or many others we could name. Nevertheless, undivided energies? It is obvious that such a with all these drawbacks, the comprehensivescheme could only be carried out on the plan of ness of the work renders it a valuable addition a eyelopædia, and be executed by many hands. to the library; and if Mrs. Hale will spend It is possible, nay, even likely, that one who another three years in revising her pages, cor. should write excellent biographies of one sort, recting her mis-spelling of names, erasing miswould be far from successful with others. The takes, and withdrawing her “microscopic ob. writer who would delight to paint the gorgeous jects” to make way for the really famous women State of Cleopatra, and, bringing classic lore to whose names are omitted, she will in all probaaid him, would“ beggar description" in showing bility enjoy the honour and satisfaction of findher forth, would perhaps give us only a cold ing her work accepted by the British and Amechalk-drawing of Caroline Chisholm ; and so in rican public as a very precious gift, and as a a thousand instances. And thus in a book not new proof of the literary ability and industry of raade up of selections, but professing to embrace her sex. every sort of notoriety of female character, it is SELECT SPECIMENS OF ENGLISH PROSE. not the more stirring for being professedly from By Edward Hughes. F. R. A.S., and Head one hand. But tameness or sameness of style Master of the Royal Naval Lower School, is of less consequence than are inaccuracies, Greenwich Hospital, &c. &c.-(Longman.)—and these, we are sorry tu say, abound. We do This work is of a very different order from the not pretend to have read this voluminous work elegant extracts” of former years. Instead of through, but we have dipped into it, and among being a mere collection made in the “ scissors tion that this Trio was performed by Vieux. NEW SOCIETY OF PAINTERS temps, Hausmann, and the composer himself,

IN WATER-COLOURS. our readers will judge how magnificently it was

(SECOND NOTIce.) rendered. Another great success of the evening was M. Chas. Davidson, and Bennett are, as usual, er.

Rowbotham, Aaron Penly, D. H. McKewan, Vieuxtemps' wonderfully brilliant Fantasie on airs from“ I Lombardi, in which he was ad- quisite in landscape; not only in their choice of mirably accompanied on the piano

by a lady subjects, but in their free-and-easy manner of

handling. whose name did not transpire: and Herr Hausmann's Fantasia on popular Scotch airs proved botham, possesses the clear atmosphere and the

No. 22. “ Lake of Como," by J. L. Rov. the subtle power of the violoncello. Among the brilliant tints of foliage which belong to the envocalists were Mademoiselle Anna Zerr, and chanted climate of Italy. Madame Doria—both of whom were in superb voice-Herr Hoelzel, the noted Lieder singer,

No. 23. “Moonrise in Holland,” is equally and Herr Reichart.

well treated, by the same artist.

No. 45. “Haddon Hall, Derbyshire," by Wm. Bennett, possesses all the sylvan beauties of an

English scene. MRS. JOHN MACFARREN'S MATINEE

Vacher, in his “ Shrine of Santa Rosalia,

Palermo,” has departed from his blue lakes and MUSICALE.

purple inountains, in which he was so effective, The first of Mrs. John Macfarren's Matinées and which we prefer to his interiors, took place on the 7th ultimo; and despite a cold, the hand of an artist and the eye of a poet, still

Chas. Davidson, ever fresh and green, with wet day-belonging rather to February than May, cheerless enough to chill and damp the delights us with his choice bits. “On the Tees

, spirits of any but the very ardent-the New looking towards Bernard Castle," is perfect

nature. Beethoven Rooms were crowded with an appre- the broad-leafed trees waving in the wind.

You hear the rushing water, and see ciating audience. Matinées always attract more ladies than gentlemen, and the former are

Mr. and Mrs. Wina Oliver have some charmthe quieter applauders; but the perfect attention ing productions. of an audience is as true a mark of it being

F. s. Prout's “Australian Gold Diggers," pleased as the clapping of hands and stamping must create great interest to all who have friends of feet; and we are very certain that Mrs. Mac" in that land of marvels. farren's exertions were duly estimated. She is

"The Boudoir,” by Benjamin Drew, is an atherself a most charming pianist, with a light, tractive subject well treated. brilliant, and most certain touch; one who J. H. Mole has given many charming pictures ; executes difficulties with that apparent ease and where all are so good, it is difficult to say which deceives superficial judges as to their which is the best. existence, while after all she makes mechanical No. 80. “Reading the Scriptures,” is one of execution not an end, but the wonderful means those touching scenes in rural life which at once of expressing the very soul and poetry of music. attract the heart of the spectator. The interior It is impossible to listen to her playing without of a cottage; an old man taking his evening's perceiving that she feels and understands the recreation (a pipe) after a day of toil, whilst his sentiments she is expounding. This was par- little grandson reads to him out of "The Book ticularly observable in a trio of Mendelssohn's, of Life.” The words have attracted the attenin which she was accompanied by M. Sainton on tion of the granddaughter, who, in the backthe violin, and Signor Piatti on the violoncello. ground, has paused in her occupation to listen. It went most delightfully. Beethoven's Sonata There is an error in the height of the girl; who, in G minor (No. 3 Op. 30), pianoforte and if near enough to hear "The Word,” would be violin, executed by Mrs. Macfarren and M. Sain seven feet high. The proportions are right for ton, was also agreat triumph. Miss Bassanosang extreme distance; but wrong if the listener is to two or three songs, and especially the “ Lascia know what is going on. With this exception, ch'io pianga” most exquisitely: and Miss Cicely the picture is a gem. The three prominent Nott, with her clear, bird-like voice and true in figures are exquisite. The peaceful contentment tonation, charmed the whole room. Madame of the old man, the earnest intensity of the boy Macfarren sang her husband's song, reading, and the luxurious ease of the sleeping “Mother, they talk of a soldier's grave,” very dog (who lies at his master's feet), are graphically ably. It is a beautiful composition, the melody sketched by the hand of the artist. of which grows upon the ear: we think, how- No. 280. “The Singers,” by E. H. Wehnert, ever, that the German Lied, “Das Alpenhorn,” is an extraordinary picture-more like tapestry which Madame Macfarren subsequently sang, than a painting-fit to adorn a sanctuary; but suits her voice still better. The concert con- not calculated,

with its mystic symbols, to please cluded with a grand duet for two pianofortes, the common eye. The more it is studied the magnificently played by Mrs. John Macfarren

more elaborate it appears. The artist must have and M. Benedict. The second Matinée, we oh- had high inspirations to produce such a work. serve, is announced for the 4th June.

000.

new

AMUSEMENTS OF

TIE

Μ Ο Ν Τ ΙΗ.

THE OPERA AND THE THEATRES. sor.” This theatre has so long been associated Verdi's opera of “ Rigoletto" was produced at with pieces, which however excellent and atthe Royal ITALIAN Opera on the 14thule., tractive in themselves, have still been of the being a novelty to the London public, though a

melodramatic order--though more people really production which has gained some reputation like a good melodrama than confess to the taste in the continent. The story is a sort of para- bilis has seemed something strange. Mr. Web

--that the recent announcement in the Adelphi phrase of Victor Hugo's “Le Roi qui samuse;" the adaptation softening down soinester, however, has proved the capability of a set of the immorality and repulsiveness of the ori of actors supposed to be unused to the " leginal. Nevertheless, the subject is so com- gitimate” drama. Mrs. Keeley was a most expetely melodramatic

one incident, indeed, cellent Mrs. Page, and Madame Celeste brought bordering on the horrible - that it never can

the force of her decided and original talent to take rank as a grand opera, or be considered the impersonation of Mrs. Ford, making the characters were supported by Mario, Ronconi, inimitable as Falstof, showing not only that he &c.; and such artists might well have rescueda tencies of the character, but that he had the far inferior work from failure. The decorations genius to embody them. Mr. Keeley and Mr. and scenery were also magnificent. Speaking

Wigan were admirable as Sir Hugh Evans and of the opera itself, the Musical World says :

Caius. Indeed, it is many years since the play “There is little offensive music in " Rigoletto;' has been produced with anything approaching the ears are seldomer stunned than in most of such a cast. the composer's other works; and there is, we At the Princess's Mr. Westland Marston's fancy, less pretence in the writing. Never- beautiful play of “ Anne Blake” has been retheless, Verdi's sins are apparent in every scene. peatedly acted with some additions and alteraPoverty of ideas, an eternal effort at originality tions by the author, which certainly elucidate never accomplished, strange and odd phrases, the plot, and make it clear to “the meanest lack of colouring, and a perpetual swagger in capacity." We have already given our opinion the dramatic effects, are unmistakably true of the noble acting of Mrs. Kean in this play: Verdi

. Most of all, the composer is deficient in The veterani, Mr. T. P. Cooke, has also appeared the serious parts; and poor Ronconi, with all as William in “ Black-eyed Susan," and proved the fire and power of his genius, could not lend that he can touch tender hearts by his delineainterest to his music. Yet there are airs- tions of Dibdin's and Douglas Jerrold's nautical melodies, if you will-in 'Rigoletto,' which are hero, as effectually as he did twenty years ago. sure to find favour with the barrel-organs. First of all is the ballata in the last act, ' Donna about to make her rentree, and will shortly ap

At the St. James's Mademoiselle Rachel is e mobile, so enchantingly sung by Mario, a very pleasing and catching tune, if not new, and famous play, which has had such a furore

pear as Lady Tartuffe, in Madame Girardin's worked out with effect. There is an agreeable during the past season in Paris. lupe, too, in the duet between Ronconi and Madame Bosio, in the second scene; aud another in the aria of Gilda, in the same scene,

MR. AGUILAR'S CONCERT. Mario's first song, also, we fancy, will find

Mr. Aguilar is a young composer and pianist, many admirers. A quartet in the last act, skil- who is rapidly, and yet steadily rising to the fully managed and well-voiced, is the best piece very highest rank in his profession. "He has

In the theatres of Italy it creates not been puffed into fame by a clique; nor has a furore. At the Royal Italian Opera, on Satur- he won temporary applause by clap-trap, maday night, it was encored."

neuvres; but the praises of true critics have At the HAYMARKET a clever three-act co- and the recognition of his merits by the public

become each season more hearty and distinct, medy, entitled The Mouse Trap,” has been more and more positive. His annual concert, produced. It is from the pen of the Rev. which took place at the Hanover-square Rooms ŠIr. White, author of "The King of the Com- on the evening of the 4th ultimo, afforded a muns,” and evinces a good deal of quaint and great treat to the lovers of good music, and was original humour. The plot is far too compli- the occasion of introducing Mr. Aguilar’s new cated to be easily described ; it may be enough Trio for pianoforte, violin, and violoncello. It to say that it affords abundant scope for the is a composition of great beauty, in G minor, acting of Mr. Buckstone, Mrs. Fitzwilliam, and and though evidencing that its composer has oiber public favourites, who make up the very studied in the pure school of Beethoven and eficient corps of the

present management. Mendelssohn, is sufficiently distinct and original At the Adelphi a great innovation has taken to free him from all charge of being an imitator. plare-nothing less than the production of a He has, in fact, genius, and makes music the Shakspere play, “The Merry Wives of Wind- medium for its interpretation. When we men

in the opera.

tion that this Trio was performed by Vieux- | NEW SOCIETY OF PAINTERS temps, Hausmann, and the composer himself,

IN WATER-COLOURS. our readers will judge how magnificently it was

(SECOND NOTICE.) rendered. Another great success of the evening was M. Chas. Davidson, and Bennett are,

as usual, ex

Rowbotham, Aaron Penly, D. H. McKewan, Vieuxtemps' wonderfully brilliant Fantasie on airs from“ I Lombardi,” in which he was ad- quisite in landscape; not only in their choice of mirably accompanied on the piano by a lady subjects, but in their free-and-easy manner of

handling. whose name did not transpire: and Herr Hausmann's Fantasia on popular Scotch airs proved botham, possesses the clear atmosphere and the

No. 22. “Lake of Como," by J. L. Rowthe subtle power of the violoncello. Among the brilliant tints of foliage which belong to the envocalists were Mademoiselle Anna Zerr, and chanted climate of Italy. Madame Doria—both of whom were in superb voice-Herr Hoelzel, the noted Lieder singer, well treated, by the same artist.

No. 23. “Moonrise in Holland," is equally and Herr Reichart.

No. 45. “Haddon Hall, Derbyshire,” by Wm. Bennett, possesses all the sylvan beauties of an

English scene. MRS. JOHN MACFARREN'S MATINEE

Vacher, in his “Shrine of Santa Rosalia,

Palermo,” has departed from his blue lakes and MUSICALE.

purple mountains, in which he was so effective, The first of Mrs. John Macfarren's Matinées and which we prefer to his interiors. took place on the 7th ultimo ; and

despite a cold, the hand of an artist and the eye of a poet, still

Chas. Davidson, ever fresh and green, with wet day-belonging rather to February than

“On the Tees, May, cheerless enough to chill and damp the delights us with his choice bits. spirits of any but the very ardent-the New looking towards Bernard Castle," is perfect Beethoven Rooms were crowded with an appre- the broad-leafed trees waving in the wind.

nature. You hear the rushing water, and see ciating audience. Matinées always attract more ladies than gentlemen, and the former are

Mr. and Mrs. Wina Oliver have some charmthe quieter applauders; but the perfect attention ing productions. of an audience is as true a mark of it being

F. S. Prout's “ Australian Gold Diggers," pleased as the clapping of hands and stamping must create great interest to all who have friends of feet; and we are very certain that Mrs. Mac- in that land of marvels. farren's exertions were duly estimated. She is

“The Boudoir,” by Benjamin Drew, is an atherself a most charming pianist, with a light, tractive subject well treated. brilliant, and most certain touch; one who J. H. Mole has given many charming pictures ; executes difficulties with that apparent ease and where all are so good, it is difficult to say which deceives superficial judges as to their which is the best. existence, while after all she makes mechanical No. 80. “Reading the Scriptures,” is one of execution not an end, but the wonderful means those touching scenes in rural life which at once of expressing the very soul and poetry of music. attract the heart of the spectator. The interior It is impossible to listen to her playing without of a cottage; an old man taking his evening's perceiving that she feels and understands the recreation (a pipe) after a day of toil, whilst his sentiments she is expounding. This was par- little grandson reads to him out of "The Book ticularly observable in a trio of Mendelssohn's, of Life.” The words have attracted the attenin which she was accompanied by M. Sainton on tion of the granddaughter, who, in the backthe violin, and Signor Piatti on the violoncello. ground, has paused in her occupation to listen. It went most delightfully. Beethoven's Sonata There is an error in the height of the girl; who, in G minor (No. 3 Op. 30), pianoforte and if near enough to hear “The Word,” would be violin, executed by Mrs. Macfarren and M. Sain- seven feet high. The proportions are right for ton, was also agreat triumph. Miss Bassanosang extreme distance; but wrong if the listener is to two or three songs, and especially the “ Lascia know what is going on. With this exception, ch'io pianga” most exquisitely: and Miss Cicely the picture is a gem. The three prominent Nott, with her clear, bird-like voice and true in figures are exquisite. The peaceful contentment tonation, charmed the whole room. Madame of the old man, the earnest intensity of the boy Macfarren sang her husband's song, reading, and the luxurious ease of the sleeping “Mother, they talk of a soldier's grave,” very dog (who lies at his master's feet), are graphically ably. It is a beautiful composition, the melody sketched by the hand of the artist. of which grows upon the ear: we think, how- No. 280. “The Singers,” by E. H. Webnert, ever, that the German Lied, “Das Alpenhorn,” is an extraordinary picture--more like tapestry which Madame Macfarren subsequently sang, than a painting—fit to adorn a sanctuary; but suits her voice still better. The concert con- not calculated,

with its mystic symbols, to please cluded with a grand duet for two pianofortes, the common eye. The more it is studied the magnificently played by Mrs. John Macfarren more elaborate it appears. The artist must have and M. Benedict. The second Matinée, we oh- had high inspirations to produce such a work. serve, is announced for the 4th June.

000.

new

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