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NUMBER LXXIII.

Of virtuous Poverty.

255

NUMBER LXXIV.

Of frivolity of character.

257

NUMBER Lxxv.

Of the natural and the moral Heart.

- 261

NUMBER LXXVI.

Of an interesting trial of old, before the royal court of

Persia.

265

NUMBER Lxxvi.

Of moral Education,

268

NUMBER Lxxviii.

Of the power of Imagination over young minds-instanced

in George Hopewell.

271

NUMBER LXXIX.

Of the foul nature and direful effects of customary gaming. 275

NUMBER LXXX.

Of the almost insuperable power of Habit,

279

NUMBER LXXXI.

Of the World,

282

NUMBER LXXXII.

Of the two most noted methods for commencing conversa.

tion,

286

NUMBER 1XXXIII.

Of the inquisitiveness of children,

290

NUMBER LXXXIV.

Of the influence of early impressions upon all the follow-

ing periods of life,

294

NUMBER Lxxxv.

Of calamitious reverses in respect to worldly circumstances 298

NUMBER LXXXVI.

Of the attention due buth to Mind and Body,

302

NUMBER LXXXVII.

Of the general proneness to petty scandal,

305

NUMBER LXXXVIII.

Of enjoying Independence as to worldly circumstances,

without possessing wealth,

309

NUMBER LXXXIX.

Of the early and ardent desire of Power,

31%

NUMBER XC.

Of giving in marriage,

316

NUMBER XCI.

Of useful Industry, considered as a moral duty,

320

NUMBER XCII.

Of the moral use of the Pillow-with reflections on sleep, 323

NUMBER XCIII.

Of the two opposite errors-the extreme of Suspicion,

and of Confidence,

328

NUMBER XCIV.

Of sunshine friends,

330

NUMBER XCV.

Of the misusage of the faculty of Memory,

334
NUMBER XCVI.

A comment upon the fable of the Invisible Spectacles, 337

NUMBER XCVII.

Of the misuse, and the proper use of Reading,

341

NUMBER XCVIII.

Of excessive and indiscriminate Novel reading,

344

NUMBER XCIX.

Of the impassable limits to the pleasures of Sense, 348

NUMBER C.

Of the difference between ignorance as respects learning,

and a natural weakness of undertsanding,

352

NUMBER CI.

Of evil thinking,

355

NUMBER CII.

Of treating children with excessive severity,

358

NUMBER CIII.

Of drawing and fixing the attention of children,

361

NUMBER CIV.

Of balancing the principles of Hope and Fear in the gov.

ernance of children,

365

NUMBER CV.

Of Brevity in relation to sundry particulars,

366

NUMBER CVI.

Of some particulars conducive to conjugal peace and hap-

piness,

371

NUMBER CVII.

Of regarding Accomphshments as the principal part of

female education,

376

NUMBER CVIII.

Of the common use of false weights and measures in deal-

ing out both Praise and Censure,

381

NUMBER CIX.

Of officiously meddling with, and a total disregard, of the

affairs of others,

385

NUMBER CX.

Of turning good to ill, by tampering with it,

388

NUMBER CXI.

Of a restless desire to know what others say of us, 392

NUMBER CXII.

Summary Characteristics,

396

NUMBER CXIII.

Of the necessity of seasonable precaution,

400

NUMBER CXIV.

Of our proneness to run from one extreme to the other, 403

NUMBER CXV.

Of despising small things,

407

NUMBER CXVI.

Of cutting the coat to the cloth,

410

NUMBER' cxvi.

A solemn Monition,

414

NUMBER CXVIII.

The Conclusion,

417

THE BRIEF REMARKER, &c.

NUMBER I.

On the blessing of Peace.*

TIMES of general tranquillity are thought, perhaps generally, to be capable of furnishing very little for gazetteers. This is partly true, but, for the greater , part, quite erroneous. Tranquil times do indeed, comparatively speaking, furnish very few astonishing inci. dents-very little to excite deep wonder, or to hold expectation on the rack ; but of other and more useful matter they furnish a plenty. When “ the world is at rest and is quiet,” it is then that those arts are best cul. tivated, which minister to the comfort and adornment of life, and it is then that the human family has the greatest amount of enjoyment. And though in such a state of things there is little to amaze, there is very much that is calculated to afford sound instruction, and to humanize and elevate the mind.

At the period of several centuries back, the evervalorous Irish, (if we may believe Stanihurst, a very old historian) baptized their children by immersion, but

* The publication of the Brief Remarker was begun directTyafter the joyful uews of general peace had reached this country,

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