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responding sounds! what, then, -must have been the effect of these united !

It is very observable that though the measure is the same, in which the musical efforts of fear, anger and despair are described, yet by the variation of the cadence, the character and operation of each is strongly expressed : thus particularly of despair :

With woeful measures wan Despair

Low fullen sounds his grief beguild,
A solemn, strange and mingled air,

'Twas sad by fits; by starts 'twas wild.

He must be a very unskilful composer who could not catch the power of imitative. harmony from these lines !

The picture of Hope that follows this is beautiful almost beyond imitation. By the M 2

united

united powers of imagery and harmony, that delightful being is exhibited with all the charms and graces that pleasure and fancy have appropriated to her :

Relegat, qui semel percurrit;
Qui numquam legit, legat.

But thou, O Hope, with eyes so fair,

What was thy delighted measure ? Still it whisper'd promis'd pleasure,

And bade the lovely scenes at distance hail ! Still would her touch the strain prolong,

And from the rocks, the woods, the vale, She callid on Echo still thro' all the song;

And where her sweetest theme the chose,
A soft responsive voice was heard at every

close,
And Hope enchanted (mild, and way'd her
golden hair.

In

In what an exalted light does the above stanza place this great master of poetical imagery and harmony! what varied sweetness of numbers ! what delicacy of judgment and expresfion! how characteristically does hope prolong her strain, repeat her foothing closes, call upon her associate Echo for the same purposes, and display every pleasing grace peculiar to her.

And Hope enchanted smild, and wav'd her

golden hair.

Legat, qui nunquam legit;
Qui femel percurrit, relegat.

The descriptions of joy, jealousy and revenge are excellent, though not equally so, those of melancholy and chearfulness are superior to every thing of the kind; and, upon the whole, there may be very little hazard in afferting that this is the finest ode in the English language.

Α Ν

M 3

AN EPISTLE

TO SIR THOMAS HANMER, ON HIS EDI.

TION OF SHAKESPEAR'S WORKS.

THIS

HIS poem was written by our author

at the university, about the time when Sir Thomas Hanmer's pompous edition of Shakespear was printed at Oxford. If it has not so much merit as the rest of his poems, it has still more than the subject deserves. The versification is easy and genteel, and the allufions always poetical. The character of the poet Fletcher in particular is very justly drawn in this epifle.

DIRGE

DIR GE

IN CYMBELINE,

ODE ON THE DEATH OF MR. THOMSON.

MR.

R. Collins had skill to complain. Of

that mournful melody and those tender images which are the distinguishing excellencies of such pieces as bewail departed friendship, or beauty, he was an almost unequalled master. He knew perfectly to exhibit such circumstances, peculiar to the objects, as awaken the influences of pity, and while, from his own great sensibility, he felt what he wrote, he naturally addressed himself to the feelings of others.

To read such lines as the following, all beautiful and tender as they are, without corresponding emotions of pity, is surely impossible :

The

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