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sympathy of a large majority among the colonists, banished all Puritan Ministers from the confines of Virginia ; and in 1649, when King Charles's head had already fallen, the colony contained twenty Church of England parishes in which the tithe was regularly and cheerfully paid, and the rector lived with his people in much “peace and love.” After the Restoration, Statutes were passed at Williamsburg enacting that the whole Liturgy should be thoroughly read every Sunday; that no Catechism should be used other than that appointed by the Canons ; and that no ministers“ but such as were ordained by some Bishop in England” should be allowed in the colony. The children of marriages performed by clergymen of all other denominations were declared illegitimate; baptism was enforced by law; and Nonconformists were forbidden to teach, even in private, under pain of exile.

APPENDIX V

See page 324

Among the extraordinarily accurate political prophecies which, amidst all his wild writing, were occasionally thrown out by Dean Tucker, was a forecast of the effect that would be produced on the question of American bishops by a separation between Great Britain and her colonies. The first of those bishops was appointed in 1787; and as far back as 1774 the Dean had written as follows about the grievance under which the Episcopalians in America then suffered.

“The Church of England alone doth not enjoy a Toleration in that full Extent which is granted to the Members of every other Denomination. What then can be the cause of putting so injurious a Distinction between the Church of England, and other Churches, in this respect? The Reason is plain. The Americans have taken it into their heads to believe that the Episcopate would operate as some further tie upon them, not to break loose from those Obligations which they owe to the Mother-Country; and that it is to be used as an Engine, under the Masque of Religion, to rivet those chains which they imagine we are forging for them. Let therefore the Mother

Country herself resign up all Claim of Authority over them, as well Ecclesiastical as Civil; let her declare North America to be independent of Great Britain in every respect whatever ; let her do this, I say, and then all their Fears will vanish away, and their Panics be at an end. And then a Bishop, who has no more Connections with England, either in Church or State, than he has with Germany, Sweden, or any other Country, will be no longer looked upon in America as a Monster, but a Man." – Dean Tucker's Fourth Tract; 1774.

INDEX

ADAMS, C. F., i. 169 n. 3, 249 n. BAILEY, Rev. Jacob, ii. 313, 315.
Adams, John, i. 17, 107; relations with Baltimore, Congress removed to, from

John Dickinson, III-118; his share Philadelphia, ii. 61.
in Congress business, 122; on Gor- Barré, Colonel, i. 54, ii. 179.
don's History, 124, 126-127; his Barrington, Lord, i. 34-36.
labours for the new colonial consti- Baskingridge, Charles Lee captured at,
tutions, 128, 130–131; relations with ii. 66.
Thomas Paine, 153-155; "the Atlas Bate, Rev. Henry, ii, 167, 171.
of Independence," 159; on Jeffer- Bazaine, Marshal, ii. 53.
son's Declaration, 164; his closing Becket, Lieut., ii. 11-12.
years, 169-171; projects a military Bishop question in America, ii. 297–302.
academy, 200; on Washington's Blackett, Sir Walter, ii. 202-204, 330-
aides-de-camp,

202; visits

Lord 331.
Howe on Staten Island with a view Bloomingdale, i. 301.
to peace, 259-266; quoted, ii. 121, Boston, Washington in, i. 172-180.
139, 293 n. 2, 299, 309 n. 2; efforts to Bosville, William, ii, 210 n. 2.
secure consecration of American Boswell, James, ii. 230.
bishops, 324, 328.

Boucher, Rev. Jonathan, ii. 314, 315.
Adams, Samuel, i. 17, 19, 152, 166, Bowes, A. R. Stoney, ii. 204-207.
265 n. 1.

Boyle, Colonel Gerald, i. 205 n. 2.
Albemarle, Lord, ii, 152–153.

Bray, Dr. Thomas, ii. 294.
Allen, Ethan, i. 79.

Brunswick, Charles Duke of, i. 42-43.
American soldier, his character, i, 208 48.
218.

Bunbury, Lady Sarah, i. 315 n. 2,
Amherst, Sir Jeffrey, ii. 208, 218. 346 n. 3, ii. 43 n.
Army, British : character and prospects Bunker's Hill, receipt of news in Eng-
of officers, i. 92-99; the private sol-

land, i. 3-5.
dier, i. 100-102, ii, 272-279.

Burgoyne, General, i. 89, 94, 117, 332-
Arnold, Benedict, invades Canada, 333, 346 n. 3.

i. 79; wounded in assault on Quebec, Burke, Edmund, his “ Thoughts on the
81; covers the retreat from Montreal Causes of the Present Discontents,"
to St. John's, 230; equips a fleet at i. 10-11; letter to Lord Rockingham,
Crown Point, 232-235; difficulties 10; on George the Third's kingcraft,
with brother officers, 235-236; delays 15; on the ministerial case, 17; on
Carleton's advance, 323; fights battle the proposal to employ Russians, 35;
of Valcour Island, i. 324, ii. 49; joins on German mercenaries, 43-44, 54;
Washington, 72; defends eastern sea appeal to Lord Rockingham, 55-56;
board against Tryon, 72-73; English his conciliatory bill supported by
opinion of him, 180-181.

Fox, 58; quotation from his speech,
Artillery, American, i. 205.

148 n. 2; on Hessians, ii. 9; letter to
Asbury, Francis, ii. 323.

Richard Champion quoted, 62-63;
Austin, Major, i. 345-345.

his fears for English liberty, 154;
PT. 11.-VOL. II.

337

z

338

THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

quoted by Gladstone, 185; on the Cobb, Sandford H., ii. 281 n., 287 th.,
Cavendishes, 216; on the French 321. n., 333.
Revolution, 229; letter to Dr. Rob- Coke, Dr. Thomas, ii. 322–323.
ertson, 245; on the Board of Trade Colonial Churches, ii. 280-297 ; all
and Plantations, 251; his speeches disestablished, 320.
and pamphlets, 255-257, 267; on “Common Sense," Thomas Paine's, i.

the Dissidence of Dissent," 301. 148–155.
Burnet, Bishop, ii. 253.

Congress, American, i. 105-122, ii. 60
Burney, Fanny, ii. 261.

61, 70, 144.
Bute, Lord, ii. 182-185, 223.

Consols, effect of the war on, i. 55, ii. 200.

Conway, Field-Marshal, i. 18, ii. 209–
CADWALADER, Colonel, ii. 9 n., 98-99. 210,
“Calm Address," John Wesley's, ii. Cornbury, Lord, ii. 283, 285.
265-279.

Cornwallis, Lady, ii. 64-65.
Cambridge University opinion, i. 13-15. Cornwallis, Lord, i. 92, 267, 277-282,
Camden, Lord, i. 18, 52, ii. 169.

291 n. 1, 307 n. I, ii. 6, 13-18, 63,
Canada under British rule, i. 70-77; 129-137, 143.
American invasion of, 77-86.

Courier, Paul Louis, i. 152 n.
Carleton, Sir Guy, Governor of Canada, Cox, Daniel, ii. 40.

i. 70; obtains Quebec Act, 74-77 ; re- Croker, J. W., ii. 167.
pels American invasion, 77–86; pre- Crown Point, American troops at, i.
pares to invade America, 86-89; 219-237; occupied by Carleton, 329;
made Commander of the Bath, 89; evacuated, 331.
delay in his advance, 323; battle of Cumberland, Duke of,

189, 209.
Valcour Island, 324; withdraws to Curwen, Samuel, i, 106 n. 1, ii, 201, 227,
Canada, 331; Chatham's high opin-

233, 234-235, 237, 239-242.
ion of him, ii. 212.
Carlisle, Lord, ii. 142 n., 148.

DARTMOUTH, Lord, i. 2, 7, 16, 23, 25-
Cartwright, Major John, ii. 218-220. 26, 91, ii, 23, 230.
Catherine II., Empress of Russia, Dawson, Henry B., i. 308, 343 n.
i. 35-37.

De Tocqueville, ii. 321.
Cavalry, Washington weak in, i. 203- Deane, Silas, i. 17, 174.
205; British, 318.

Dechow, Major Von, ii. 89, 103, 105, IIO.
Cavendish, Lord Frederic, ii. 215-216. Declaration of Independence, i. 155-
Cavendish, Lord George, i. 59.

171.
Cavendish, Lord John, i. 53.

De Lancey, Floyd, i. 219 n.
Champlain, Lake, i. 232, 324.

Delaware River, Washington retreats
Chatham, Lord, i. 18, 32, 109, ii. 153, over, ii, 20-21; crossed in the attack
180, 190, 211-213.

on Trenton, 99-101.
Chatterton's Hill, i. 314.

Derby, Captain, i. 2.
Chauncey, Dr. Charles, ii. 296. Dickinson, John, author of the “ Farm-
Churchill, Charles, ii. 185.

er's Letters," drafts petition to the
City of London, political opinion in, King, i. 19-22; opposes John Adams
i. 12–13, ii. 190–201.

on question of Independence, 112-
Clergy, Colonial, in the Revolution, ii. 116, 158–159; his influence in the
303-318.

Pennsylvanian Assembly, 135-137.
Clinton, General George, i. 193 n. I, Disestablishment of all Colonial

241, 253, 302, 320, 335 n, I, ii. 96. Churches, ii. 320.
Clinton, Sir Henry, i. 92, 241, 267, 277- Donop, Colonel Von, i. 271, 303, ii.
282, 293, 303, ii. 15, 33.

85–123, 130.

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