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LONDON : PRINTED BY sroTTISWOOD AND CO., NEW-STREET SQUARA

AND PARLIAMENT STREET

1813-1873

BY

JOHN EARL RUSSELL

Ille potens sui
Lætasque deget, cui licet in diem
Dixisse, Vixi; cras vel atra

Nube polum Pater occupato,
Vel sole puro : non tamen irritum,
Quodcunqne retro est, efficiet ; neque
Diffinget, infectumque reddet,
Quod fugiens semel hora vexit'

HOR, Lib. 3, Ode 29

Not heaven itself upon the past has power,
But what has been has been, and I have had my hour'

DRYDEN

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PREFACE

TO

THE SECOND EDITION

In the volume which I have already published I have recorded events which not merely affected my own career as a Statesman, but which have formed an epoch in the history of Great Britain.

It gives me great pleasure to perceive that, while the vast changes which have taken place in the course of sixty years have been effected by the regular authority of the Crown, the Lords and the Commons, there is no danger of a repeal of the measures, or a reaction in the public spirit of the nation. Mr. Canning said to an applauding audience, 'In disfranchising Grampound, if that is to be so, I mean to preserve Old Sarum. No one thinks in these days of reviving Old Sarum and its companions of Schedule A. Even the laws which provided for the abolition of the Protestant Established Church in Ireland, and the measure which provided compensation to Irish tenants driven from their farms by the arbitrary decree of the landlord, seem to repose in safety under a Conservative Ministry.

Since the publication of my first edition there has appeared, in part at least, a biography of the Prince Consort, one of the wisest and most virtuous princes who have shone in the history of Europe. In a letter of that illustrious Prince, lately published, which is addressed to me, the Prince advises that in the conduct of foreign affairs we should not attempt to disturb or overthrow existing and stable governments ; but should confine our efforts to the encouragement of nations which, by their own exertions and their own wisdom, attempt to enlarge their freedom and to obtain their independence. Such is the course which I have uniformly pursued. When I was told, as Prime Minister, that Kossuth, the Hungarian Patriot, was likely to be invited to the great City dinner of November 9, I wrote to the Lord Mayor, that if Kossuth was to be invited I could not attend the dinner. I thought this restriction was due as a mark of friendship and regard to the Emperor of Austria. When at a later period, the Italians had vindicated their freedom and independence by the sword, I took

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