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From this moment'he looked upon himself as a dying man, and turned his thoughts wholly to’ another world. He read much inlthe Scriptures, particularly in the Psalms; but whilst he be- haved with the serenity of a man prepared for death, his friends exhibited an honourable‘ anxiety to preserve his life. Lord Essex would‘ not leave his house, lest his absconding might incline a jury to give more credit to the‘ evidence against Lord Russell. The Duke of Monmouth sent to let him know he would come in, and run fortunes with him, if he thought it could do him any service. He answered, it‘ would be of no advantage to him to have his‘ friends die with him. ’ .

A committee of the Privy Council came to examine him. Their enquiries related to the meet-3

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ings at Sheppard’s, the rising at Taunton, the seizing of the guards, and a design for a rising in Scotland. In answer to the questions put to him, he acknowledged he had been at Sheppard’s house divers times, and that he went there with the Duke of Monmouth ; but he denied all knowledge of any consultation tending to an insurrection, or to surprize the guards. He remembered no discourse concerning any rising at Taunton, and knew of no design for a rising in Scotland. He answered his examiners in a civil manner, but declined making any defence till his trial, when he had no doubt of being able to prove his innocence. The charge of treating with the Scots, as a thing the Council were positively assured of, alarmed his friends, and Lady Russell desired Dr. Burnet to examine who it could be that had charged him ; but, upon enquiry, it appeared to be only an artifice to draw a confession from him ; and, notwithstanding the power which the Court possessed to obtain the condemnation of their enemies, by the perversion of law, the servility of judges, and the submission ofjuries, Lord Russell might still have contested his life, with some prospect .of success, had not a new circumstance occurred to cloud his declining prospects. This was the apprehension and confession of Lord Howard. At first, he had talked of the whole matter with scorn and contempt; and solemnly professed a

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tnat he knew nothing which could hurt Lord’ Russell. The King himself said, hefiound Lord Howard was not amongst them, and he supposed it was for the same reason which some of themselves had given, for not admitting Oates into their secrets, namely, that he was such a rogue they could not trust him. But when the news was brought to Lord Howard that West had dea livered himself, Lord Russell, who was with him, observed him change colour, and asked him if he apprehended any thing from him? He replied, that he had been as free with him as any man. Hampden saw him afterwards under great fears; and desired him to go out of the way, if he thought there was matter against him, and he had not strength of mind to meet the occasion. A warrant was now issued against him, on the evidence of West; and he was taken, after a long search, concealed in a chimney of his own house. He immediately confessed all he knew, and more. It appears but too probable, indeed, from the two following extracts, the one from Narcissus Luttrell’s diary, and the other from Lady Russell's private notes, that Lord Howard, on the first appearance of danger, endeavoured to save his life at the expense of that of his friends :— ,

“ Ever since the first discovery of this plot, (says Narcissus Luttrell,) there have been dis

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T , . . courses of a peer’s coming in to discover the same, which now proves to be the Lord How

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“ There having run a story of a letter, without a name, writ .to the King, promising a discovery against Lord Russell, which someqsaid was Lord Huntingdon’s, some Lord Essex’s, Lord How-'ard and his wife being here on Sunday last, a lady coming in, whispered me in the ear, that here was the Lord that now they saidhad written the said letter to His Majesty’. I whispered to her againwand asked her whether she would give me leave to tell him. Sheanswered, Aye, if you will, when I am gone, without naming me. After which, she and all the rest of the company being gone,- except Lord Howard and his lady, who staid for their 'coach, I said to my lord and his wife, ‘ My Lord, they say now that you are the person that writ the nameless letter to the King.’ To which he replied, ‘ My Lord of Essex, as much as I ;' and I, as much as my Lord of Essex. May my Lord Russell, and all inndcent men, live'ltill I accuse them!” ieil'tfl

Hampden and Lord Russell were imprisoned upon Lord ‘E Howard’s information Q? and, four

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