Графични страници
PDF файл
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors][merged small][graphic][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

a‘ swinging pspuniity, he (as'ChiefJiistice) we]; in, and‘ ranted on that use most impetuou‘siy. It fell out, that’ when the Earl' of Shaftesbiu-y had sat some short time in the Council, and seemed to rule the roast, yet" scr'ogigs had some qualms in his politic‘ conscience; and, dorhing from Windsor in the Lord Chief Justice Noitli’s coach, he took the opportunity, ahd desired his lordship to tell him seriously, if my Lord'Sha'ftesliury had really so great' power with the King as he was thought to have. His lordship answered quick, “ No, my lord, no more than your footman hath with ybu.” Upon that, the other; h‘ung his head, and considering the matter, said n'cithing for a goiid while, and then passed to other discourse. After that time, he turned'as fierce against Oates and his plot, as ever before he had ranted for it; and, thereby, gave so great afl‘ence to the evidenceships, the plot witnesses, that Oates and" Bedloe accused him to the Kiiig‘, and preferred formal articles of divers extrava-_ gances and immpralities against him. The appointed an hearing of the‘ business in council, where Scroggs' run down his‘_accusers with much ' severity and wit; and the evidences fell short; . sf) that, for want of proof, the petition and a1;-i . ‘,5, ticles'were dismissed. But, for some jobs in the’ ‘i , _~ . King’s Bench, as discharging a jury, 8cc. he’had‘ ' if‘ the horio‘di‘th be impeachedhn Parliament, of .'

[graphic]
[graphic]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic]

the most impartial character of a judge to defer to eldership, or antiquity. But to proceed: this man’s morals were very indifferent; for his beginnings were debauched, and his study and first practice in the gaol. For having been one of the fiercest town rakes, and spent more than he had of his own, his case forced him upon that expedient for a lodging, and there he made so good use of his leisure, and busied himself with the cases of his fellow collegiates, whom he informed and advised so skilfully, that he was reputed the most notable fellow within those walls; and, at length he came out a sharper at the law. After that, he proceeded to study and practise till he was eminent, and made a serjeant. After he was Chief Justice of the King’s Bench, he proved, as I said, a great ruler, and nothing must stand in the way of his authority. I find a few things noted of him by his lordship, (Lord

[graphic]

Keeper Guildford.) , i M ortgfied an attorney to death. Case Q/‘Lady '4 log/e, where advised that there was subornation, ’,, -for which Johnson was ruined, and heart-brolre.i The lady prosecuted Johnson for this suborna- ‘

[graphic]
« ПредишнаНапред »