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manner of his life. It is written from Stratton, ‘in Hampshire, a seat which Lady Russell had inherited from her father, and the countryresi; dence of Lord Russell from the time of his marriage. “ September 30, 168].

“ To see any body preparing and taking their way to see what I long to do a thousand times more than they, makes me not endure to suffer their going, without saying something to my best life, though it is a kind of anticipating my joy when we shall meet, to allow myself so much before the time. But I confess I feel a great deal, that, though I left London with great reluctancy, (as ’tis easy to persuade men a woman does,) yet that I am likely to leave Stratton with greater. They will tell you how well I got hither; and how well I found our dear treasure here. Your boy will please you; you will, I think, find him improved, though I tell you so before-hand; they fancy he wanted ’you; for, as soon as I alighted, he followed, calling Papa: but I suppose ’tis the ‘word he has most. command of, so was not disobliged by the little fellow. The girls were in remembrance of" the happy 29th September ‘*, and we drank your health, after a red-deer pye, and at night the girls and I supt on a sackposset; nay, master would have his room, and for heat burnt his fingers in the posset; but he does but rub his hands for it. .. I do propose going to. my neighbour Worsley’s to. day. Would f'ain be telling my heart more things,--any thing to be in a kind of talk with him; but. I believe Spencer stays for my dispatch. He was willing to go early; but this was to be the delight of the morning, and the support of the day. ’Tis written in bed, thy pillow at my back, where thy dear head shall lie, I hope, to-morrow night, and many more, I trust in his mercy,,notwithstanding all our enemies, or ill-wishers. Love, and be willing to be loved by, “ R. RUssELL.”

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* Lord Russell's birthday. ;- '

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Though the Whig party seem to have sunk quietly into retirement after their defeat, the King could, by no means, rest satisfied with‘ the victory he had obtained over his parliament, and the general tranquillity which ensued. He was determined to execute vengeance on his opponents, and establish arbitrary power upon a system of terror. For this purpose, he did not scruple to employ those witnesses whose perjuries. in the trials for the Popish plot he had been the foremost to expose. The first person selected for punishment was Stephen Colledge. This man was a carpenter, who, by his noisy 'Duke of Monmouth, and other men of rank,

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had acquired the name of the Protestant joiner. Turberville, Dugdale, Haynes, and Smith'swore against him many treasonable discourses, and some strange stories of his having silk armour, and' pocket pistols, at Oxford. The grand jury, however, refused to believe the witnesses. and threw out the bill. .But the Court was not to he foiled in this manner :' they removed the trial to ‘Oxford, where a jury, as partial on the other side, was procured. Colledge had, besides, many hardships to undergo. His papers ‘were taken from’ him on his way to trial, and the court adjourned on‘ purpose to examine them‘. So that, whilst the crown lawyers had the advantage of knowing the points he meant to have argued, this poor mechanic was unable to plead the informality of the indictment, or to use other legal arguments he intended to have urged. A copy of the pannel, which had been usually given

‘to prisoners,’ was denied him, and his own wit' nesses were not allowed: to be examined upon

oath. Notwithstanding these disadvantages, he brought forward such evidence as materially injured the credit of the witnesses against him.. Excepting Sir W. Jennings, and Mr. Masters, he showed that every one of them had owned himself forced to change sides, to avoid starving, or had been guilty of’ attempting to suborn'

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