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As to war,

PARLIAMENTARY INTELLIGENCE.

37 was both a humane, and politic measure. as an abstract question, Gentlemen might readily be supposed to entertain different and sometimes fluctuating opinions; for his part, he had no hesitation in declaring, that, from long experience in most branches of tacties, he had naturally become a steady and decided friend to general warfare, as the source of man's prosperity. As to the conflict in which we were immediately engaged, he would take the liberty to ask, how can the blood and treasure of England be better employed than in supporting the regal sovereignty and religion of the Spanish nation ? Gentlemen might smile, “but,” says the Right Honourable Gentleman (solemnly laying his left hand on the contrary breast, erroneously thinking to find his heart on the RIGHT side), I vow to God, I shall always think the war holy, just, and pure; and therefore ihe Address has my hearty concurrence.”

[Here there was a violent call of Question! question ! question!!)

Mr. RF or rose to order; and in a mild and terse manner, so peculiarly his own, hoped that the Commons House of England was not turned into a bear-garden (Hear! heur! hear! from both sides of the House. ]-As to the Convention of Cintra, it was a delicate subject, and therefore all he should say upon it was, that too many hd cooks had spoiled the broth! Before he sat down, there was another subject not less delicate, on which he wished some information: it was reported that the French had taken all the women, with the baggage of our light horse ; if that was the case, he should be glad to know what the rascals did with them? [Peals of laughter.]

Mr. H. uns B said, that he should not trespass upon the House much beyond their usual indulgence; but the importance of the very serious points brought into discussion--the alarnjing crisis of the

fate

38

THE MOONSTRUCK WARRIOR..

fate of Europe at this moment, and the subjects glanced at, had, he confessed, taken so firm a possession of his mind, that he could not suffer them to pass by without some investigation at the opening of the sessions. At present, he said, he should siniplify the subject-matter to be discussed under nine headsonly, which, according to his conception, might be severally analysed in the course of the evening's debate.- {Here Bellamy's well-seasoned GRIDIRONSbegan to work, and our Reporters left the House-expected to sit late.]

THE MOONSTRUCK WARRIOR. WRITTEN AFTER READING ONE OF BONAPARTE'S

LATE BULLETINS.

From the Morning Post, Jan. 24.)
THE
HE good man reposes by fears untormented,

But sleep from the couch of the guilty one flies ::
Thus Boney at midnight, with mind discontented,

With Beelzebub wanders, and secretly sighs. Yet vanity clings to the Corsican loon ;

For as lately he rov’d, plotting mischiefs in Spain, In a fit of real transport he spake to the moun,

And these were the words of the moon-stricken swain : " Ah, Luna! fair creature, so brightly you 're shining,

'Tis plain you're in love with my beautiful face ; And learn, Madam Luina, thy love stands repining,

That fate keeps between us a terrible space. “ For Terra, averse to my lust of dominion,

Breathes nothing but curses against thy fond lover; And after provoking to madness thy minion,

She bids me leap to thee my wits to recover. “ Yet, Luna, attend to the vow of thy knight,

Thy knight very true with his wits on the wane; Ere I quit the brown scorner, in malness and spite,

With the blood of her children her bosom I 'il,stain.

" Having

GLEE IN THE NEW TRAGEDY.

39

“ Having done so before, I'll my practice repeat."

* A gallant resolve, my good son,” says the devil; “ But the moon you ’íl not go tombelow I 've a seat,

A warm one prepar'd, for my rival in evil.

GLEE
IN THE NEW TRAGEDY OF MUCH ADO ABOUT

NOTHING."

BY JOÁN BULL.
Tune-Sigh no more, Ladies.

[From the Morning Chronicle, Jan. 27.)
SIGH
IGH no more, Jolinny; Johnny, sigh no more ;

Mad were these statesmen ever,
One foot in sea and one on shore,
To one thing constant never.

Then sigh not so,

But let them go,
And be thou blithe and bonny,
Converting all thy sounds of wue

Into-Hey Johnny, Johnny !
Send no more armies ; Johnny, send no mo'

To join the Spanish levy;
But let thy crazy statesnien go,
That loss will not be heavy.

Then sigh not so,

But let them go,
And be thou blithe and bonny,
Converting all thy sounds of woe

Into-Hey Johnny, Johnny!

TO THE

EDITOR OF THE MORNING CHRONICLE.

SIR, THE 'HE inclosed Lines, as their tenour denotes, were

written by an admirer of the late Sir John Moore, immediately after intelligence had arrived of the com

menceinent

LINES ON SIR JOHN MOORB. mencement of his march from Lisbon. As contri. buting to show what expectations were entertained from the military talents of our lamented hero, you perhaps will not object to publish them oven now, although opportunity for the full display of those talents was withheld, and has been withdrawn for ever.

Yours, &c. 27th Jan. 1809.

UNCHECK'D by regards of duration or distance,

How sweet on the missions of Fancy 10 stray ! To leave the dull confines of local existence,

And wanton and bask in the glitter of day! But hence ye pale visions of sickly invention ! A scene not unreal my senses e

enchains;
Now Spain, all in arms, rears the flag of contention,

And Europe's last battle is fought on her plains.
In quest of the fight march her bigir-sould defenders ;

Their phalanx how dense, and impetuous their tread!
The foe his vain ensigns of empire surrenders,

Fear chases his hosts, and his satraps are fed ; The Gaui calls new hordes from the wide circling regions ;

Dark clouds of stern mence the prospect obscure :-Enraptur'd I mark the advance of the legions

Which Britain, undonbting, confides to her Moore. Through deseris, o'er mountains, crois foods and morasses,

The Hero explores his inflexible way; -
Slow Famine, insidious, strews snares where be passes,

And fronting his progress stands War in array:
Ah! were the fond breathings of friendship availing,

Ripe harvests, lov'd chieftain, shond siart from the sod i Wide floods roll confin'd beneath arches unfailing,

And War, like a slave, be controli'd by thy nod! Fit theme for light ode or grave legend preparing,

Go, measure thy worth gainst the minions of fame;' Intrepidly cautious, and skilfully daring,

Change defeat to success, and mould triumphs from shame, Pursue thy high fares, and, serenely ambitious,

The rank which thy merits award thee, assume
A Churchill, of laurels alone avaricious;
A Nelson, unstamp'd by the seal of the tomb !

LINES,

LINES, EXTEMPORALLY WRITTEN, IN ANSWER TO SOML LI:

BELLOUS STANZ AS, FALSELY FATHERED UPON JOHN BULL, AND INSERTED IN THE OPPOSITION CHRONICLE OF JAN. 27. (See p. 39.)

(From the Morning Post, Jan. 30.) FOAM away, “ Talents," as long as ye please ;

Statesmen run mad 't is quite plain that ye are, Having no feet to stand on, ye prate at your ease,

And will nor from proving, your weakness forbear. Assist not the Spaniards, you say to John Bull,

But turn all your friends and good servants away. But Johnny, you 'il find, has some brains in his skull,

And will not be led by the Talents astray. Once he was lur'd by your boastings 80 vain,

And then “ crazy statesmen" made terrible work, So he vows he'll ne'er trust lo such statesmen again,

Again to be bang'd by both Christian and Turk.
He'll others employ, who, with less of pretension,

May lead him to honour, to greatness, and fame
Whom if to revile 't is your noble intention,
The Talents will soon reap a harvest of shame.

JOHN BULL.

ON BONAPARTE'S ABUSE OF ENGLAND IN

THE MONITEUR.

[From the Morning Herald, Jan. 30.] " The English have sent to Spain libels and poniards in profusion."

See the Twelfth Bulletin, THUS the pickpocket, scheming for reljef,

Runs with the crowd, and bellows ouit, “ Stop thief !”
Dext'rous to shift the scárdal, and transfer
Suspicion on the worthy passenger.

Thus the great Robber of our Gothic age,
Who struts an Emperor on Europe's stage,
This meteor, for our punishment design'd
To blaze, the scourge and terror of mankinda

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