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PLAYGOING WIGS,

345

But when I take a spouse once more,
( As Roxburgh and fair Mansfield did before,)

And give him my affection,
I vow to Jove, my radiant Sol's own sire,
ST is not to sate a cureless warni desire,

But merely for protection!

COVENT GARDEN THEATRE VERSV'S

SHAKSPEARE *.

[From the Morning Chronicle.]
POOR Shakspeare is hardly beset,

In this most tyrannical age;
His wig is turo'd out of the pit,
And his wit is turn'd off from the stage.

W1GSBY.

PIT

OP

THE PROGRESS OF CIVILIZATION. ON THE COXDUCT OF A CERTAIN BARRISTER, IN THE

COVENT GARDEN THEATRE, ON FRIDAY NIGHT.

(From the British Press, Dec. 13-) WO centuries ago a Shakspeare rose,

T'improve mankind and to adorn the stage; Another Shakspeare modern times close,

The stage disgracing by fell strife and rage. N. PR

TW,

PLAYGOING WIGS.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE MORNING CHRONICLE.

[Dec. 14.]
SIR,
I

AM a lady who, no matter whether from illness or

age, have lost the flowing ringlets that once played in graceful negligence around my neck. I have lost

* Mr. Shakspeare, a barrister, was taken to Bow Street for wearing his professional wig in the pit.

them

Q5

346

THE NEW-BUILT PLAYHOUSE, o !

them in reality, but only in reality-for, thanks to the perfection to which our peruke-makers have carried their delightful art, I can still in appearance vie with the flaunting misses who have not met so unkind a fortune in this respect as myself. I entreat your permission to ask, through the medium of the Morning Chronicle, the advice of some of your correspondents on the dilemma in which a late circumstance has placed us. You are to know, Sir, that I am come to iown but for a few days, and ain dying to see the inside of Covent Garden theatre; but before I venture there, I must beg to be informed in wigs of what colour, how many curls, &c. &c. a lady may risk her presence at that place, without danger of being taken out by these horrid Bow Street people. That I may not be in such jeopardy from wearing an illegal wig, or be debarred the pleasure of giving my friends in the country a description of the splendid edifice, I en treat an early answer from some of your polite correspondents; and trust that you will excuse this intrusion, which proceeds from the extreme anxiety of Your obedient servant,

KATE CAXON.

THE NEW.BUILT PLAYHOUSE, O!

(From the same.]
Tune-" The Bay of Biscay, O!
L OUD roar'd the watchman's rattle,

Dust-bells began the din,
Announc'd the hour of battle!
'Twas half price rushing in;

Whilst o'er the rascal crew
Vast consternation flew

At the fight

On that night,
In the new-built playhouse, O!

The

KEMBLE, LEAVE THE PIT ALONE,

342

The catcalls next shrill sounding

'Midst O. P.'s vocal strain; The magic dance, resounding, Near rent the walls in twain !

Our victors strengthen’d grew,
O'erturn'd the Bow Street crew,

At the fight,

On that night,
In the new-built playhouse, O!
Then, must'ring up our forces,

Attack'd the thieves again;
But-number'd in our losses
A few brave O. P. men.

The victory was ours,
Brave O. P. loudly roars,

At the fight,

On that night,
In the new-built playhouse, O!

KEMBLE, LEAVE THE PIT ALONE,

[From the same, Dec. 15.] Air“ Barney, leave the Girls alone." JOHNNY, leave the pit alone,

Let 'em crack their wit alone;
Can't
you

let 'em sit alone,
Let''em sing O. P.?
Why with lawyers fagging 'em,
Up to Bow Street dragging 'em,
Brandon aims at gagging 'em,

More the blockhead he,
Johnny, leave, &c.
Other measures try at, O!
Let the house be quiet, O!
Coughing is not riot, O!

Valiant boys are we.
Johnny, &c.
Despotisni French is, o !
0. P. lads and wenches, o !
Gallop o'er the benches, o !

Trip it merrily.
Johnny, &c.

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Now

348

THE Q. P. VICTORY.
Now lead down the middle, O!
Foot it to the fiddle, O!
Fol de dol de diddle, O!

Shout, my boys, O.P.
Johnny, leave the pit alone,
Let'em crack their wit alone;
Can't you let 'em sit alone,

Let'em him sing 0. P.1

THE O. P. VICTORY.

(From the same, Dee. 16.]
Tune-" Old Towler."

The O. P.'s take their ground,
On all sides reinforcement pours,

At rattles' well-known sound;
Then shouting forth their fav'rite songs,

They beat time as they sing,
Britons strike home! avenge your wrongs,
. And then-God save the King,

With a hey ho rattle,

Hark forward to battle.
While as the battle fierce did glow,

John Kemble stood in view,
Begg'd silence-making then his bow

"0. P.'s, I yield to you.
Brandon shall quit us in a trice,

No private box shall be,
And, pittites-you shall have old price,
You've gaind the victory.

With your hey ho dancing,
Hark forward and prancing."

C. B.

DEATH OF O. P.

[From the General Evening Post, Dec. 19.] DIE IED suddenly, last Thursday, at the Crown and

Anchor Tavern, as he was entertaining a large party of friends, the celebrated O. P, at the advanced age of 66.

To

DEATH OF O. I.

349 To this extraordinary character we may apply what Whitelocke, has said of Lord Strafford Certainly never man acted such a part, on such a theatre, with so much wisdom, constancy, and eloquence."--His birth was accompanied by many portentous circum. stances. Like Bacchus-whom, as his enemies would maliciously insinuate, he not a little resembledhe was born at the moment his mother was consumed by the flames. In his infancy, he was noisy, fretful, and violent; but this proceeded from bad management; for in general he was reinarkably good-tempered, and maintained to the hour of his death the character of a rattling roaring fellow.- Sometimes, it must be admitted, he was rough, and even terrible in his manner; but those who were best acquainted with him, say that this was half play.--Although a good pugilist, he had a particular aversion to private boxing. In literary talents he was by no means deficient, and is suspected to have been author of many humorous pieces, in prose and verse. Like Sir Roger De Coverley, he has given name to a dance. The hats made according to his direction are much approved of; but his principles made him an enemy to patents. We fear that his matrimonial connexions were not very fortunate, as his enemies have often reproached him with his horns. That O. P. was a zealous Christian, we may judge from his hatred of the Jews; but his political principles have given rise to very various and opposite opinions. That he loved the King, there is no doubt; nay, it is well known that he chanted God save the King every night before he went to bed. To foreigners be had an uncontrollable aversion. The liberty of the subject and the trial by jury were' his constant themes. He was engaged in many law-suits, and always proved too strong for his antagonists; nor was this surprising, as his advocates were always the Best. The deceased has been frequently accused of

too

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