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THE NEW YEAR.

In the full tide of ecstacy, rejoicing
To hail the dawning of a golden age.

But ah! how different is the gloomy scene
Which flashes on the griev'd observer's eye!
Abroad the vital blood of thousands slain
In unavailing war, still reeks to Heaven;
Fell Discord waves her torch, and deadliest hate
In tyrants' hearts engendering forebodes
Another and a more terrific storm.

Yet, oh my country! 'mid the wreck of worlds
How fondly could I view thy glorious, proud,
And lofty eminence-laughing to scorn
Eternal danger-only vulnerable
When thy own children aim the monstrous blow.-
Hail blessed Isle ! raising the fallen up ;
Thy broad shield throwing o'er the patriot bands,
To guard their infant struggles to be free,
And save them from the Despot's bloody chain :
Who could believe that there was tongue
As durst to wag in noise" against thy fame
Yet such there are-a vile and factious crew,
Once tried, and found most lamentably wanting ;
In promise vast, destructive in fulfilment.
.Now gorg'd with envy, rack'd with gnawing pangs
Of foul ambition baffled, how they burn,
And in their frenzied ravings falsely dare
Usurp the Patriot'S EVER-HALLOW'D name,
And style their selfish aims the love of country ;
Reckless if, in the storm their brawlings raise,
That country perish!

so rude

*

*

*

HANG EM.

LAST

LAST SCENE IN THE LAST ACT OF A FARCE

CALLED THE CABINET, AS PERFORMED BY HIS MAJESTY'S SERVANTS AT THE THEATRE ROYAL IN D-N-G STREET, WESTMINSTER.

[From the Morning Chronicle, Jan. 12.] Enter His Grace the D- of P-D, reading a

Dispatch. HOW very odd that Bonaparte should leave Madrid

in such sloppy weather! L-E-N. I'll be bound to say, that no inan in his senses would travel with the roads in such a state; at least, if he does, he must take four horses, and that would prevent me at any time.

L-M-E. Not one of my brothers would believe me, when I said, if Bonaparte did march this weather, he would be over shoes, over boots ;" but they all laughed heartily, and called it a good joke.

Mr. S-Y-G (with a sneer.) I told ye all we should be in the mire, and not Bonaparte.

Earl of L-L (wiping a tear from his eye.) Ay, my poor father's last words were, Hawkey, Hawkey, Napoleon will be too much for all of

you respect whatsoever."

Earl of W--D (tumbling into the room.) Why, who the d-would have thought of all this !

Earl C-N (shaking his head like Lord Burleigh.)

Earl B-T (reeling, with a bottle in his hand.) I knew Bunaparte was quizzing us all the time, but we'll be even with him, I warrant you. [Exit, singing, This boitle's the sun of our table," &c. &c.

Viscount C-H. If we could but have agreed at first upon the commander that should have been sent out, and the ordnance office and cominissariat had done their duty, this ne'er had happened. But the armistice and convention of Cintra, and the three

commanding

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BONEY'S PROCLAMATION, commanding officers all in one day, has been mine and my country's ruin. (Weeps bitterly.)

Earl of C-H-M (aside.) Had I been appointed to the command, there would have been heavy ordnance enough.

Right Hon. S-RP-I (in a peevish tone of voice.) We must bring an action against the commissary general, eject Bonaparte from Spain, arrest his whole staff, and file a bill against the Supreme Junta unless this is done, before term ends, I will resign,

[Exeunt omnes. N. B. A tragedy is in rehearsal, and will be per.. formed on the 19th instant.

BONEY'S PROCLAMATION; OR, BROTHER

JOEY OR I.

A NEW SONG.

[From the Morning Post.]
NAPPY the Great, in my proud usurp'd state,

Decree by this here Proclaination,
And strictly ordain, that the people of Spain
Shall subunit to our Joe's usurpation,

But if they refuse
To accord with my views,

And with regeneration comply;
Then I'd have them know,
Instead of King Joe,

They shall have no king, d-me! but I.
When arriv'd at the crown, I'll vengeance pour down,

And o'erwhelm them in torrents of evil;
For, by " I the King," all the Patriots shall swing,
And the people shall find me a devil.

That scoundrel Cevallos
Shall go to the gallows,

For exposing my plottings so sly;
And their nobles, God wot,
When caught, shall be shot,
For rejecting our Joey and I.

Those

NEW READINGS FROM OTHELLO.

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Those curs'd British clans, that mar all my plans,

And thwart e'en ny deepest inventions,
Erom Spain soon shall vanish, then I'll touch the Spanish,
And punish them for their contentions.

My wrath I will lease
On the vile Portuguese,

For crossing my purposes high;
And, my object to gain,
Make a desert of Spain,
For despising our Joey and I.

TUETHA.

TO THE

EDITOR OF THE MORNING CHRONICLE.

(Jan. 13.]

SIR,

I HAPPENED to be rummaging among some old

plays, the other day, when, by good luck, I found a very curious

copy of Othello, interspersed with nanuscript notes, and in perfect condition, except that it is rather worm-eaten, and has lost the title-page. The first leaf has suffered most severely, and I regret it the more, because it contains the following remark. able deviation from the authenticated text of Shakspeare:

“ For certes, says he,
I have allready chose my secretary.
And what was he....
Forsooth, a great tautologician,
One Vi... Cas.... an Irishman,
A fellow allmost damnd in a faire wife,
That never sett a squadron in the field,
Nor the division of a battle knows
More than a spinster; unlesse the bookish theoricke,
Wherein the toged consuls can propose
As masterly as he; mere prattle without practice

Is all his soldiershippe. But he, Sir, had the election." The imperfect part of the fourth line, Vi... Cas....

may

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ADVERTISEMENT EXTRAORDINARY.

may be easily construed into Michael Cassio, as the V, when perfect, was most likely an M. But where did the printer get the words “ tautologician," and “ Irishman?” I should be glad if any of your intelligent readers who may happen to possess a similar copy, in better condition, will inform me, through the medium of your widely circulated paper, what is the printer's name, and the date which the imprint bears.

I am, Sir, yours, 9th Jan. 1809.

A COMMENTATOR.

ADVERTISEMENT EXTRAORDINARY.

[From the Morning Chronicle, Jan. 16.) MADNESS.-One of His Mys principal mem

bers of the family and domestic c-b-t having required information from the royal college of state physicians, relative to the prevalence of this disorder, occasioned by the bite of the Cintra rat, which, at this moment, is known to be spreading its baneful effects over most of the counties and borough towns of the United Kingdom, the College are directed forthwith to report, for His M-y's information, such facts as may have appeared to them upon inquiry, with a view of remedying this evil. All country physicians, surgeons, apothecaries, rat-catchers, and horse-doctors, are requested to communicate, previous to the 19th instant, by a letter addressed to the secretary of the royal college, Ty Chrs, W-l, an account of such cases as have fallen under their personal observation within the last four months. The symptoms which have shown themselves most prevalent amongst M-b-rs of P-t are those of extreme apathy and disinclination to attend to public business, together with violent spasmodic affections of

the

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