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140

MRS. CLARKE AND D. WRIGHT'S PETITION.

pannel or jury (upon their approaching trial for perjury), in the county of Middlesex or city of London.

And your female petitioner, M. A. Clarke, especially, most humbly suggests, that as Colonel Wardle has appealed to his country at large, requiring the public to suspend their opinion upon his character, until the issue of her said trial for perjury—she may in her turn request and require your Honourable Court to suspend the delivery of the said box of gold until the event of the trial.

And she farther, with all respect and submission to your Honourable Court, suggests, that she possesses far higher claims to the thanks and remuneration of your Honourable Court, for the.“ zeal, intrepidity, and patriotism," she evinced in the laudable and arduous undertaking, than can be urged in favour of G, L. Wardle.

. That the said G. L. Wardle actually took away her letters by force, and bruke his solemn word of promise in bringing forward certain articles of accusation from which he engaged to abstain, and violated her confi. dence upon various occasions.

That, notwithstanding the bad faith and violence of the said G. L. Wardle, she conscientiously persevered in giving her evidence, as agreed upon, and in part paid for by the said G. L. Wardle, without which the said laudable undertaking" must have been abandoned in shame and despair-And

Your said female petitioner therefore most humbly, but also confidently, prays, that another Court may be convened, after the issue of her trial for perjury, for the express purpose of discussing and deciding the priority of her claim to the thanks and freedom of the city--who has been true to all her engagements, and who has really and essentially achieved and finished the “ laudable undertaking"-over the spurious preten. sions of G. L. Wardle; who, for the sake of a few

hundred

DUET OF MR. COBBETT AND COL, WARDLE.

141

hundred pounds (which he has lost with costs and damages), has endangered and finally overthrown, undone, and for ever destroyed and disgraced the said, “ laudable undertaking.” And, as in duty bound, your petitioners will ever

(L. S.)

D. WRIGHT.

(L. S.) MARY ANNE CLARKE, [From the Morning Post, July 18.]

pray, &c. &c.

DUET BETWEEN MR. COBBETT AND COL.

WARDLE, ON THE SUBJECT OF THEIR LATE RESPECTIVE EXPO..

SURES-DEDICATED TO, AND ADAPTED FOR THE USE
OF YOUNG GENTLEMEN TROUBLED WITH VOICES.

[From the same, July 20.)
Air" I've kiss'd and I've prattled."

COBBETT.
I'VE prattled and sided with fifty M. P.'s;
And a weathercock been, d' ye.see;

(bis.) But of all the wise means that adopted should be, Parli'men'try reform, Sirs, for me!

Parli'ment'ry reform,

Parli'ment'ry reform,
Parli’ment'ry reform, Sirs, for me.

COL. WARDLE.

I've pump'd and bamboozled the spruce Mrs. Clarke,
And as great an ass prov'd as could be;

(bis.)
But of all the vile dæmons that stalk on the earth,
The vilest of dæmons is she !

The vilest of dæmons,

The vilest of dæmons,
Ay, the vilest of dæmons is she.

COBBETT.

(bis.)

My Registers brought me five thousand a year,

And matchless, indeed, they were deem'd;
But, since Georgy Manners has pullid off my mask,
And expos'd me to popular scorn,

Henceforth, hard to tell !

I Merinos must sell
Now is n't my lot most forlorn?

COL:

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COL. WAROLE.
Sofa-beds, chairs and tables, bidets and commodes,

Have play'd, Sirs, the devil with me. (bis.
Oh! why did I not, when I found my cash fail,
Apply to the friends of reform?

They knowing the plight,

I was brought in, by Wright,
Would not, doubtless, have let nye done wrong.

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TOGETHER.
Since of hope we're bereft, and have no comfort left,

Hand in hand to the Thames let's repair ; (bis.} And, bewailing the turns of that jade's, Fortune's, wheely Let's get rid of our care and dismay!

If the d I won't have us,

To the sea he can shove us,
And the sharks and the porpoises may.

IMPROMPTU.

[From the same.]WHEN Icarus *, with new-made power elate,

A while presumptuous, tower'd each lofty fieap, By radiant Sol this bold one met his fate,

Was plung’d into “ the bosom of the deep :"
So Wardle, in his bold aspiring flight,

Forgot that he had overstepp'd his mark,
Till stopp'd in his career by pow'rful Wright,
The Colonel finds he's conquer'd by his Clarke.

C. T. G, H.

VAGABONDIZING TO CHELTENHAM.
(From the Morning Herald.)

Cheltenham, July 24. IN this

age of inflation, we have seldom regarded an instance of the art of puffing more decidedly characteristic, than the following notification of a puppet

* Icarus had waxen wings, and, flying too high, the sun dissolved the wax, and he fell into the sea,

show,

VAGABONDIZING TO CHELTENHAM. 143 show, which was personally delivered to me yesterday evening, on the Music Walks, by no less a convey ancer than the manager himself:-

VIVE LA BAGATELLE. The director of the inimitable Fantoccini bas the honour of informing the nobility and gentry, and mobility of Cheltenham, that his detectable corps dramatique will exhibit their unparalleled feats this evening, at the Grand Saloon of Momus.

Aftor an exordium from the chorus, in imitation of the Greek drama, the wooden servants of the Muses (an endless family) will have the felicity to represent The Virgin Unmasked; or, Tabitha Bramble in her Attitudes. The principal character by Miss Beech, from the Forest of Dean, who will make her debut on this interesting occasion; and the director solicits the indulgence of the critics, in behalf of the feelings of an interesting Commençante.

After which, the Petition of the Dogs to Jupiter for an Amelioration of their Condition: the part of The Comical Dog, by that renowned comedian Mr. Punch, who will recite Tristram Shandy's Chapter on Noses, with new readings.

As an Intermezzo, or interlude, Mr. Leadenbottom will throw a saraband on the tight rope; this prodigious exertion will surprise those who were never surprised before. This wonderful display will be succeeded by a pas de Deux, between the Emperor of Morocco and the Gloster Beauty:

The whole to conclude with the patriotic spectacle of “ Hearts of Oak are our Ships, Hearts of Oak are our Men," by Mr. Punch, in the character of a Greenwich pensioner, and assistants.

Signor Elm, having unfortunately broken bis leg in a Pas Seul, cannot have the honour of appearing on this evening ; but the director has the high delight to inform the beau monde, that he is under the care of a

skilful

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144

INTELLIGENCE FOR TOWN.

skilful carpenter, and will be fit for the resumption of his duty tv-morrow, when he will personate the arduous character of The Baker, in the admired tragedy of Jane Shore.

N. B. Smoking is prohibited in the boxes, and no gentleman must talk to Mr. Punch, but the fiddler.

Another N. B.-Ladies who have no carriages, and do not wear pattens, are respectfully informed, that the cows are removed from the vicinity.

INTELLIGENCE FOR TOWN:

****** IN A LETTER FROM THE MAYOR OF

IN THE
COUNTRY, TO HIS COUSIN MR. GABRIEL GUBBINS IN
LONDON,
(Being an Answer to Two Letters, see po 133, 135.)

(From the Morning Post, July 25.]
I THANK you, cousin, for each letter ;

For one of mine, I'm two your debtor:
But as to fag myself I'm loth,
I mean this one should stand for both.
For though I'm mayor 't is not of course
Always" the mare's the better horse.”

Your news with us at first but far'd ill
About our patriot, Colonel Wardle:
For some it made not over-jolly,
Yet has it curd us of our foily;
And as a symptom of repentance,
On all memorials we've pass'd sentence.
His likenesses, in wood engravings,
Are doom'd to light our fires-in shavings ;
And farther of conversion token
The Wellgwood vases-all are broken ;
Save one, which ornaments the bed
Where Mistress Mayoress rests her head :
And she's so well inclin'd-my trust is,
The Wedgwood will have ample justice :
And let the patriot sink or swim,
Not much more shall we see of him.

: And

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