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United States. at sundry cessions, after the peace of 1781 Admitted into the Union . 1802 INDIANA.

This state was formerly a part of the North-Western Territory, and was admitted into the Union 1816 Adopted its first constitution at the same time.

MIChi GAN.

This was also a part of the North-Western Terri- tory—Was raised into a territorial government 1806

LOUISIANA.

This state which, lies between the territory of Arkansaw on the north, and the Gulf of Mexico on the . south, was purchased of France, together with the vast regions of Louisiana, for 15,000,000 of dollars 180s

Erected into a state and admitted into the Union 1812

MISSISSIPPi. - :

This state originally belonged to Georgia, and was * erected into a territorial government 1800 Became a state and was admitted into the Union 1817

ILLINOIS. - - -

This state was originally a part of the North-West.

ern Territory, and erected into a territorial govern

ment - 1801 Became a state and was admitted into the Union 1816

ALABAMA. i

This state originally belonged to Georgia—
Became a territorial government 1817
Became a state and was admitted into the Union 1819

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This composed the northern section of the vast purchase of Louisiana—

Was erected into a territorial government 1804

Formed her state constitution - - 1820

*Was admitted into the Union 1821. ARKANSAS

Is situated between the states of Missouri and Louisiana, and composed a part of the vast regions of the Louisiana purchase—

Was erected into a territorial government 1819

EAST AND west-Florida

Were ceded by Spain to the United States, and erected into a territorial government 1821 These states have all formed and adopted republican forms of government, upon the original plans of NewEngland, and Pennsylvania, and have thus become so many pillars in that grand temple of American liberty, the Federal Constitution. The primary object of this work has been to shew the origin of this pure system of liberty, and to trace its progress from the days of the 14th century down to the times in which we live, and shew how the pure religion of the gospel has fanned the sacred fire, until it has become one vast column, and given light, and life to these dark and benighted regions of the west.

Twenty or thirty years since, these western states were literally the habitations of cruelty; the abodes of savage beasts, and more savage men; and now they are covered with rich and flourishing towns, and villages, filled with a numerous population of free, and enlightended citizens,

whose noble and virtuous exertions have added nine illustrious pillars to the glorious Republic of United America. This vast interior region abounds with every variety of soil and climate, and furnishes in rich abundance all the conveniences, and as many of the luxuries of life as are essential to the happiness, and prosperity of man. The vast waters of the Mississippi, through the medium of its numerous tributary streams, affords all the facilities of internal navigation, as well as foreign intercourse with the ocean, that could possibly be desired. The numerous steam-boats, and vessels, on the western waters, which now exceed one hundred, have rendered this internal.navigation both safe, and expeditious ; and given to the western farmer, and merchant, all the facilities of mutual interchange of commodities, that the Atlantic Ståtes enjoy, on their extensive sea-board. Added to all this, the hands of these hardy and industrious sons of labour have cleared the forests, levelled hills, and vallies, and opened numerous roads, that intersect each other in every necessary direction, to promote mutual and reciprocal intercourse, throughout the habitable parts of this vast interior. The federal government, ever mindful of the best interests of this section of United America, have provided, as a permanent fund for the education of the rising generation ; 45,680 acres of land for each new state, or two entire townships, to be applied to the purpose of endowing seminaries of learning. Also, 640 acres for the benefit of each town, as a permanent fund for the support of schools. Education is the broad basis on which the civil and religious privileges of United America have hitherto rested, and on which they must continue to rest; remove this basis, and the grand fabric of American liberty will totter to its base, and tumble into ruins ; preserve this, with the virtuous principles, intelligent understandings, and skilful industry she now enjoys, and the united republic of America may bid defiance to faction and conspiracy, and become the admiration of ages. For a minute description of this vast interior, see the numerous Geographies, with their Atlasses, now in use fhroughout the United States.

CHAPTER XXVI. A BR1EF GEOGRAPHICAL SKETCH of THE UNITED STATES.

Boundaries.—The United States are bounded on the north, and northwest, by Upper and Lower Canada, and

New-Brunswick ; southeast by the Atlantic Ocean; south'

by the Gulf of Mexico; and west by New Mexico in part, and partly by the Pacific Ocean. . -

Rivers and Lakes.—If you cast your eye over the map of North-America, you will there see the United States intersected, and watered by the largest and most numerous lakes and rivers, that are to be found in any other country, on the whole habitable globe. Among the former may be. seen those vast lakes, or inland seas, that divide the United States from Canada; with numerous others of a minor. class. And among the latter may be seen the grand and majestic St. Lawrence, that conveys the vast waters of the great lakes into the gulf of its own name ; also, the vast waters of the Mississippi, that conveys the numerous, rivers and streams of the west into the Gulf of Mexico. Among the numerous streams upon the Atlantic coast, may be seen the Kenebec, the Merimac, the Connecticut, the Hudson, the Delaware, Potowmac and James, together with the numerous small streams, of the southern states, with the majestic rivers that fall into the Gulf of Mexico through. the Floridas. - - . . . . ;

These vast and numerous rivers and streams not only .

serve to fertilize the country ; but they afford the facilities of internal commerce, to a degree not known in any other country. This intercourse may be greatly improved by the following canals. Canals.--The Great Canal of New-York, now in forwardness, between Albany, and Buffalo, will connect the Hudson with Lake Erie; from Lake Erie, this

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