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In fancy'd want, (a wretch compleat),
He starves, and yet he dares not eat.

The next to sudden honours grew ;
The thriving art of courts he knew :
He reach'd the height of power and place;
Then fell, the victim of disgrace.

Beauty with early bloom supplies .
His daughter's cheek, and points her eyes.
The vain coquette each suit disdains,
And glories in her lover's pains.
With age. she fades, each lover flies,
Contemn'd, forlorn, she pines and dies:

When Jove the father's grief survey'd,
And heard him Heav'n and Fate upbraid,
Thus fpoke the God :. By outward shows
Men judge of happiness and woe :
Shall igporance of good and ill
Dare to direct th' eternal will ?
Seek virtue ; and of that possesty,
To Providence resign the rest..

FABLE XLVII...
The Court of DEATH.

N EATH,,on a solemn night of state,

In all his pomp of terrors fate : Th’ attendants of his gloomy reign, Diseases dire, a ghastly train, Crowd the vast court. With hollow tone A voice thus thunder'd from the throne. This night our minifter we name, Let ev'ry servant speak his claim;. Merit shall bear this ebon wand. All, at the word, Itretch'd forth their hand..

Fever;

Bb 3

Fever, with burning heat possest,
Advanc'd, and for the wand addrest.

I to the weekly bills appeal,
Let those express my fervent zeal;
On ev'ry sight occasion near,
With violence I persevere. -

Next Gout appears with limping pace,
Pleads how he shifts from place to place;
From head to foot how swift he flies,
And ev'ry joint and finew plys;
Still working when he seems supprest;
A most tenacious stubborn guest.

A haggard spectre from the crew
Crawls forth, and thus asserts his due.
'Tis I who taint the sweetest joy,
And in the shape of love destroy :
My shanks, sunk eyes, and nofeless face,
Prove my pretension to the place.

Stone urg'd his ever-growing force.
And, next, Consumption's meagre corse,
With feeble voice, that scarce was heard,
Broke with short coughs, his fuit preferr'd.
Let none object my ling’ring way,
I gain, like Fabius, by delay; i
Fatigue and weaken ev'ry foe.
By long attack, secure though flow.

Plague represents his rapid power, Who thinn'd a nation in an hour.

All spoke their claim, and hop'd the wand. Now expectation hush'd the Band,

When thus the monarch from the throne. ... Merit was ever modest known.

What, no physician speak his right!
None here? But fees their toils requite.
Let then Intemp'rance take the wand,
Who fills with gold their zealous hand.

You,

You, Fever, Gout, and all the rest,
(Whom wary men, as foes, 'detest),
Forego your claim; no more pretend :
Intemp’rance is esteem'd a friend ;
He shares their mirth, their social joys,
And, as a courted guest, destroys.
The charge on him most justly fall,
Who finds employment for you all.

The H ERMIT.

[By Dr. THOMAS PARNELL.] TAR in a wild, unknown to public view, T' From youth to age a rev'rend Hermit grew; The moss his bed, the cave his humble cell, His food the fruits, his drink the chrystal well: Remote from man, with God he pass’d the days, Pray’r all his bus'ness, all his pleasure praise.

A life so sacred, such serene repose, i Seem'd heav'n itself; 'till one suggestion rose, That vice shou'd triumph, virtue vice obey, This sprung some doubt of providence's sway: His hopes no more a certain prospect boast, And all the tenour of his soul is lost: So when a smooth expanse receives imprest Calm nature's image on its watry breast, Down bend the banks, the trees depending

grow, And skies beneath with answ'ring colours.

glow: But if a stone the gentle scene divide, Swift ruffling circles curl on ev'ry side, And glimmering fragments of a broken sun, Banks, trees, and skies, in thick disorder run.

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TO

To clear this doubt, to know the world by

light, To find. if books, or swains, report it right; (For yet by swains alone the world he knew, Whose feet came wand'ring o’er the nightly.

dew)
He quits his cell; the pilgrim-staff he bore,
And fix'd the scallop in his hat before;
Then with the sun a rising journey went,
Sedate to think, and watching each event.

The morn was wasted in the pathless grass,
And long and forefòme was the wild to pass;
But when the southern sun had warm’d the day,
A youth came posting o'er a crossing way;
His raiment decent, his complexion fair,
And soft in graceful ringlets wav'd his hair.
Then near approaching, Father, hail ! he cry'd,
And hail, my son, the rev'rend Sire reply'd ;
Words follow'd words, from question answer

flow'd, And talk of various kind deceiv'd the road; 'Till each with other pleas’d, and loth to part, While in their age they differ, join in heart: Thus stands an aged elın in ivy bound, Thus youthful ivy clasps an elm around.

Now sunk the sun; the closing hour of day Càme onward, mantled o’er, with fober grey; Nature in silence bid the world repose: When ́near the road a ltately palace rose :. There by the moon thro' ranks of trees they

pass, Whole verdure crown'd their floping sides of

grass... It chanc'd the noble master of the dome, Still made his house thc wand'ring stranger's. home :

Yes

Yet still the kindness, from a thirst of praise,
Prov'd the vain flourish of expensive ease.
The pair arrive : the liv'ry'd servants wait; '
Their lord receives them at the pompous gate.
The table groans with costly piles of food,
And all is more than hospitably good. :
Then led to rest, the day's long toil they

drown, Deep funk in Necp, and silk, and heaps of

down. . At length 'tis morn; and, at the dawn of

day, . . · Along the wide canals the Zephyrs play;

Fresh o’er the gay parterres the breezes creep, And shake the neighb'ring wood to banish

sleep. Up rise the guests, obedient to the call : An early banquet deck'd the splendid hall; Rich luscious wine a golden goblet grac'd, Which the kind master forc'd the guests to

taste. Then pleas'd and thankful, from the porch , they go ; And, but the landlord, none had cause of

woe; His cup was vanilh'd; for in secret guise The younger guest purloin'd the glitt'ring

prize. As one who spies a serpent in his way, Glist’ning and balking in the summer ray, Disorder'd stops to fhun the danger near, Then walks with faintness on, and looks with:

fear : So seem'd the Sire; when far upon the road, The shining spoil his wiley partner show'd.

He

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