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submission without a murmur to his most wise dispensations and unerring providence, having aithankfiil harte for the yeares I have been so“ perfectly contented in. He knows best when we have hadIenoughhere : what I most earnestly beg from his mercy is, that wee both live soe as which ever goes first, the other may not sorrow as for one of whom they have no hope; then let us cheerfully expect to be together to a good old age, if not, let us not doubt but he will support his servants under what trials he will‘ inflict upon them. ' These are necessary _ine--> ditations sometimes, yt we may not-be surprised above our strength by a sudden accident, being unprepared. Excuse me if I dwell to long upon it‘; ’tis from my opinion that if wee can be‘ prepared for al conditions, we can with the greater tranquillity enjoy the present; which [hope will be long, tho’ when we change ’twill be for the better, I trust, through the merit of Christ. Let us dayly pray it may be so, and then admit of no feares. Death is the extremest evil against nature, it is true; let us overcome the immoderate fear of it, either to our friend or selfe, and then what light hearts may we live with. But I am immoderate in my length of this discourse, and consider this is to be aletter. To take myself off, and alter the subject, I will tell you the newes came on Sunday night,” Sac. D Q

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. The rest of the letter contains court and family news. Enough has been quoted to show that this excellent woman enjoyed the most perfect happiness with her husband. And as, according to Sir W. Temple, he was without tricks or private ambition, he was not likely to forego the tranquil enjoyment of his home for the bustle of public life, where (in the most favourable view of it) pleasure is not so unmixed, nor duty so obvious. Hitherto he had been a silent member of the House of Commons, though he had sate there for more than twelve years; and in all probability he would have continued through life an inactive representative, had not extraordinary events called forth the native energy of his character, never afterwards to sleep but on the scaffold. A view of the period when he first came forward in public will, I hope, satisfy the reader that no man could any longer keep aloof who valued the independence, the freedom, and the religion of

England.

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his insincerity prevented any hope of peace. On the other hand, the army which the people had been obliged to raise in defence of justice and freedom, finally overturned both by aiding the expulsion of the parliament, the execution of the king, and the elevation of Cromwell. But an authority so irregular could not long maintain itself in England, and the Protector was no sooner dead than the people openly showed their longing for the restoration of the ancient constitution. The artifices of Monk, and their own tumultuous joy, unfortunately hindered the nation from listening to those who advised them to secure the rights for which so much blood had been shed. The calamities of civil war were mingled‘in their minds with constitutional privileges.

In this temper the people willingly obeyed the voice of the royalists, and echoed the prejudices to which, twenty years before, they had refused a hearing. And though the king and his minister did not entirely abstain from acts of vengeance, no sympathy could be excited in favour’ of those who were looked upon as the authors of the late troubles. Yet in the joy of new power, the professions of the soverei were plausible and constitutional. “ I m5 not propose to myself,” he said, “ any one rule. in my actions and counsels, than this,

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