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the walls ; neverthelesse were repulst with great lease and shame. In the Arsenal they keep the Colours that were taken from the Ennemie, scaling ladders (made after such a manner that they were carried behind the horsemen, being to bee taken to pieces,) and a petard, charged with the same charge t’was then, as Trophies of the Victorie. Soe that ever since they have kept very strickt watch, and let noe people come in without knowing who they are, a doeing of which they keept us soe long that I had time to looke upon their Armes, with their motto, which is at present Post tenebras Lu.z'—-‘ before the Reformation it was Post teneln'as spero Lucem. Wee had no sooner entered the towne but wee espieda wooden structure very offensive to the eye, and hinders a man from a view of the houses which are very well built for the most part, neverthelesse tis very convenient in hot and rainey weather. Geneva is very pleasantly situated, having vineyards and meadows about it, and a very fine lake, wherein are taken the best trouts that can bee eaten, and it’s reported that Monsters have been scene in it not above water but under, which I first ‘heard off as followeth : — Wee went to see the Librarie, (where there is a Bible written in French 400 yeares agoe, with many other rare Manuscripts,) which looketh upon the Lake, the bottom of which the mariners could not find with 500 fathom; tis reported that not far from thence a boat chanced to be cast awaywherein there were bells, the which a man undertook to recover for same sum of money, to which place being gone with all his instruments and devices,‘ but he had not been very long i - under water, but he pulled a cord (which was the signal when they should pull him up), and when they had done soe he told them (being all frighted) that he saw the bells, but such :P' horrid monsters by them in cavernes, that he I thought if he went downe againe he should never come up again: which happened as he had said, for going down for the second time the cord was cut in two, and the man never heard of since. I tell it you the more credi- bly, in regard that the Minister who shewed us'the College and Librarie said it had happened in his time. Sir, I thought to have given you some account of Augsburgh, but I see I have husbanded neither time nor paper, wherefore I must break off thus abruptly. In my nexte I shall not faile to tell you something of the place, and apologize for my scribbling- In the mean time I rest “ Sir, . “ Your assured friend,

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“ \VILLIAM RUSSELL»

“' From Augsburg, Dec'27-—it is
nowwery late at night— 1656.”

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Mr. Thornton to Mr. Russell.

“ Hon”. Sir,

“ Twicenow hath ye sun (that perpetuall Traveller) completed his tour through ye 12 ‘ I

Signes, 25; returned to ye same point, (if I mis

remember not,) since I kissed yol‘ hands, 8 : left ‘ you in ye sight of that military vessell that 1“ wafted you from England intoa forrain soile.

In lieu of wch losse (give me leave to call it so) I could not expect so rich a compensationas I have since received by your frequent & hand- . ‘ I some letters. How proud I am of them, 8: what contentment they afford me, may be read (they say) plainly in my countenance every time a pacquet comes. I have two now to return you thankes for, viz. that of Apr. 8. st. n., 8: one that I received two houres agoe, dated ye 18‘h of y‘’ same moneth, each of them'fraught with choise descriptions 8c observations cloth’d in a style so free; masculine, coherent, exact, 8 : every where like itself, that I profess (w"‘out flattery) the greatest masters of eloquence need not be ashamed to own it. To encourage you to proceed and out-doe yourself, let me insert a passage out of a late Autho', (w°“ comes now to h.my mind,-) viz. [that pens improve like children’slegs, proportionally to their exercise: so

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f some have bin amazed at ye length of their own reach when they came to be extended by employment: as appeared in ye late King Charles; who, after his more imperious destiny had placed him under y‘ tutorage of an unavoidable necessity, attain’d a pen more majesticall than the crown he lost..] I think 1 hinted to you in my former, how much my Lord y°' father is pleased with ye perusall of yours to me, 8: often he sends for them to shew to strangers, who thereupo’ do much congratulate ye happy successe he hath, 8c is like to have of yo‘ education This last w“ I received this afternoon hath given him (as well as myself) very acceptable entertainment, 8 : your Lady mother too, who is but now beginning to come out of her chamber: shee took much notice of one particular, viz. that of ye Count of Avensberg’s 82 sons, especially when shee heard they were so well provided for. I should have supposed they were not all legitimate, but that History tells me the German women are good breeders, and ye men not addicted to that vice of unchastity. I wish I had bin with you when you saw those various rarities in the Duke of Bavaria’s pallace. I like extremely well that sentence under y‘ Emblem of Monarchy, (8: so did my Lord when I'interpreted it to him.) Some might do well to relate it to his Highness ye L‘1 Protectour, who, I beleeve, may subscribe to ye truth of ye first of the 8 already (for sure it hath cost him many a sigh to get to this altitude), 8: how soon he may to the other 2, retinendi, & amittendi, dies docebit. His finall answer was expected this day, but ’tis put off till to-morrow‘ We are all very much mistaken if he accept not ye Crown. And then ’twill be, As you were. Some oppositions have bin made by those fifthmonarchy-men I mentioned in my last, who were

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taken in time with their armes & am’unition, 8: “

standard, &c. Since which time they were attempting again, and appointed a place of rendezvous, w‘h ye Protecto having‘ secret intelligence of, sent Mr. Randall, (even JoshuaRandail, ye sober mad-man as he calld him,) ‘whom he knew to be trusty and resolute, w"1 a. party of horse to take them. ’Twa.s about Epping in Essex; whither he got about midnight, 8: found them gathering into a body well arm’d and horsed: he divides his party, 8: falls upo’ them on a sudden, firing (with powder only) in their faces, wch so amazed them that they cryed quarter: 8: were about 60 taken (more than ye party that took them: ye rest escaped away,) & brought to White-hall by Got’ ye clock in ye morning, w"l their hands hound behind them on their horse-backs, fbr wch service». my L‘I Preteeto' hath an eye upo’ him‘0 44

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