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predict to the King a total ruin if he followed the advice of their enemies, and a. glorious reign if he dismissed them. By this contrivance he hoped to be not only Secretary of State but prime minister. But upon some quarrel with the Duchess of Cleveland, s'he betrayed the whole to the King; and brought Montague into disgrace.* However, he came over to England without leave, and by means of the Treasurer’s good oflices was admitted to kiss the King’s hand. At the same time, he showed to Lord Russell, and other opposition members, the

letters which implicated the Treasurer, and obtained from the French court a large sum for compassing his ruin. Lord Danby, hearing of his meetings with the Opposition, tried to find some means of getting possession of his papers, and for this purpose, it is supposed, made Sir Leoline Jenkins write from abroad that he had a correspondence with the Pope’s nuncio. With this letter in his hand, he obtained an order from the Council, for seizing Montague’s papers. Upon a message from the King to the House of Commons, informing them of this order, a warm debate arose on the legality of seizing then rising up, informed the House he had letters in his possession implicating a great minister. Lord Russell owned that the contents of some of these papers had been imparted to him, and that Montague had secured copies of them, though he could not then come at the originals. Upon this information, Mr. Harbord and others were sent to a place where Montague directed them, and brought back a box full of papers. Montague selected out of these two letters, which were read by the Speaker. They were addressed by Lord Danby to Mr. Montague, when at Paris. One of them, dated March Q5th, contained the following passage: -“ In case the conditions of peace shall be “ accepted, the King expects to have six millions of livres yearly, for three years, from “ the time that this agreement shall befigned “ between His Majesty and the King of France, “ because it will be two or three years before he “ can hope to find his Parliament in humour to “ give him supplies, after your having made “ any peace with France.” At the bottom were these words: “ This letter is writ by my “ order. C. R.”

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papers. Montague sat for some time silent, and

‘ See Duchess of Cleveland’s Letter. Appendix to Harris’s Life of Charles II. ’

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This discovery naturally excited both anger and alarm. It was remarked, that on the 90th March, an act had passed for a war with F 'ance, and an army raised in pursuance of it,

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ofidestroying parliaments, was treason; but as they had not yet done so, no declaration of that kind could justly affect Lord Danby. When the impeachment was brought up to the Lords, the Earl made a speech in his own defence; when, instead of vindicating his culpable negoe ciations, he thought it a sufficient justification to say, that he had the King’s order under his own hand: a plea which, if allowed, would make ministerial responsibility a phantom. The Lords refused to commit him upon the charges of the Commons, and the dissolution of the Parliament soon after, interrupted the proceedings. On the 30th December, the King came to the House of Lords, and prorogued Parliament, with these singular expressions: “ My Lords and Gentlemen, — It is with great “ unwillingness that I come this day to tell you, “ I intend to prorogue you. I think all of ybu “ are witnesses that I have been ill used. The “ particulars of it I intend to acquaint you with “ at a more convenient time.” - These terms seem to allude to the prosecution of the Popish Plot, and the impeachment ofLord Danby. The Parliament was dissolved? ' Jam 25. within a month afterwards. The chief 1679- cause of this measure probably was, that the House of Commons was becoming quite unmanageable; and the King had some

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