Final Memorials of Charles Lamb: Consisting Chiefly of His Letters Not Before Published, with Sketches of Some of His Companions, Том 1

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E. Moxon, 1848 - 462 страници
 

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Страница 28 - At some future time I will amuse you with an account, as full as my memory will permit, of the strange turn my frenzy took. I look back upon it at times with a gloomy kind of envy ; for, while it lasted, I had many, many hours of pure happiness. Dream not, Coleridge, of having tasted all the grandeur and wildness of fancy till you have gone mad ! All now seems to me vapid, comparatively so.
Страница 67 - EPITAPH ON AN INFANT. ERE Sin could blight or Sorrow fade, Death came with friendly care ; The opening bud to Heaven conveyed, And bade it blossom there.
Страница 52 - I will only give you the outlines : my poor dear, dearest sister, in a fit of insanity, has been the death of her own mother. I was at hand only time enough to snatch the knife out of her grasp. She is at present in a madhouse, from whence, I fear, she must be moved to an .hospital.
Страница 199 - The Falconer to the Lady said ; And she made answer " ENDLESS SORROW ! " For she knew that her Son was dead. She knew it by the Falconer's words, And from the look of the Falconer's eye; And from the love which was in her soul For her youthful Romilly.
Страница 1 - Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9.30 am to 7 pm in Full Term. (9.30 am to 1 pm, and 2 pm to 4 pm in Vacations.) Saturday: 9.30 am to 12.30 pm in Full Term only (closed in Vacations). The Library is closed for ten days at Christmas and at Easter, on Encaenia Day, and for six weeks in August and September. This book should be returned on or before the latest date below: Readers are asked to protect Library books from rain, etc.
Страница 147 - Marinere from being conversant in supernatural events has acquired a supernatural and strange cast of phrase, eye, appearance, &c. which frighten the wedding guest. You will excuse my remarks, because I am hurt and vexed that you should think it necessary, with a prose apology, to open the eyes of dead men that cannot see.
Страница 147 - Travels, where the mind is kept in a placid state of little wonderments; but the Ancient Marinere undergoes such Trials, as overwhelm and bury all individuality or memory of what he was, like the state of a man in a Bad dream, one terrible peculiarity of which is: that all consciousness of personality is gone. Your other observation is I think as well a little unfounded: the Marinere from being conversant in supernatural events has acquired a supernatural and strange cast of phrase, eye, appearance,...
Страница 222 - Tis enough to be within the whiff and wind of his genius for us not to possess our souls in quiet. If I lived with him or the Author of the Excursion...
Страница 54 - I preserved a tranquillity which bystanders may have construed into indifference — a tranquillity, not of despair. Is it folly or sin in me to say that it was a religious principle that most supported me ? I allow much to other favourable circumstances. I felt that I had something else to do than to regret.
Страница 196 - But thou that didst appear so fair To fond imagination Dost rival in the light of day Her delicate creation...

Информация за автора (1848)

Charles Lamb was born in London, England in 1775. He was educated at the well-known Christ's Hospital school, which he attended from age eight to 15. It was there that he met Samuel Taylor Coleridge, who became a lifelong friend; the friendship was to have a significant influence on the literary careers of both men. Lamb did not continue his education at the university, probably because of a nervous condition that resulted in a severe stammer. Instead, he went to work as a clerk, eventually becoming an accounting clerk with the East India Company, where he worked for most of his adult life. However, he continued to pursue his literary interests as well and became well-known as a writer. His best work is considered to be his essays, originally published under the pen name Elia, but Lamb also wrote poetry, plays, and stories for children under his own name. In 1796, Lamb's sister, Mary Ann, went mad and attacked her parents with a knife, killing her mother and wounding her father. She was placed in an institution for a time, but was eventually released into her brother's guardianship. This incident, and later periods when she was institutionalized again, had a great effect on Lamb, who had always been very close to his sister. Charles and Mary Ann Lamb collaborated on several books, including Poetry for Children, Mrs. Leicester's School, and Beauty and the Beast. Probably their best-known collaboration, however, was Tales from Shakespeare, a series of summaries of the plots from 20 Shakespearean plays, which was published in 1807. Charles Lamb died in 1834.

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