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as ill; hut; am really amazed that so much of that sovycr and pernicious quality sbou'd J>£ joined with so much natural good hu? raour as I think Mr. Steele is posscss'd of.

I am. Sec. {

2fl J/r. CONGRE V'E.

MR. rojttf is going to Mr. Jervass^ where Mr. Addijon h fitting for his pictme ; in rhemean time amidst cloud5o|f tobacco at a coffee-house 1 write this letter.* $bcreis a grand revolution ztWilhs Monke, has quitted for a coffee-house in the city, and Vitcomb is restor'q1 to the great joy 6f Cromwell^ who was at a great loss for a person to converse with upon the fathers and church history; the knowledge I gain frernf hjm, is intirely in painting and poeiry$ and Mr. Pope owes all his skill in astronomy to him and Mr. Whiston, so celebrated of lat? ot his discovery of the longitude in an Extraordinary copy of Verses.* Mr. Rowe's Jane. G>ay is to be play'd in Easier-Week^ whs n Mrs. Oldfitld is to personate a character air* ctly opposite to female nature; for what woman eyer despis'd Sovereignty? You Know Chaucer, has a tale where a'knight

. * Culled, An Ode on Ciic Loslgitud<V» SwiftYmi Pope> saves bis head, by discovering it 'was the thing which all Women most coveted. Mr. Pope's Home* is retarded by rh'd great rains that have fallen of late, which causes the iheets to be long a drying; this gives Mr. Lintot great uneasiness, who is now endeavouring, tocorrupt the Curate of his parjfii to pray sot fair weather, that his work rnay go on. There is a six-penny Criticism lately pitblifh'd Upon the Tragedy of the Whatd'ye-call-it, wherein he with much judgment and learning Calls me a Blockhead, and Mr. Pope a. knave. His grand charge Is against' the Pilgrims Progress being read,, which he fays is directly level'd at Cato's reading Plato; to back this censure, he goes on to tell you, that tlie Pilgrims Progress being mentioned to be the eighth edition, makes the reflection evident, the Tragedy ot Cato having just eight times (as1 he cjjuaintly expresses it) "vifted the Press. He has also endeavoured to fliow, that every particular passage of the play alludes to some fine pare oF Tragedy* which he fays 1^ have irijudifciotifly and profanely abused. *• Sir Samuel Garth's, Poem upon my Lord Clare's house, 1 believCjWill be publifli'd in the Edfler-weeh tThiis far Mr. Gay — who has in his letter forestaH'd all the subjects of diversion1/ unless ""*., 'i 1,.. . j 1.'" -| ".''•.» Hi

■%M*jtw turijuiPiete.mt entitled, A compfeat.Key to t^c *jjat.d*y'ecari-if. It lids ariUiA fy m Griffin t VUsir, t&ltcAfy Lewisi Theobalds .

mffi mi it it sliou'd be otve to you to say, that I fit up till two a-clock over Burgundy and Champagne i and am become so much a rake, that I mail be ashamed in a stiort time to be thought to do any sort of business. I fear I must get the gout by drinking, purely for a fashionable pretence to sit still long enough to translate four books of Homer. I hope you'll by that time be up again, and I may succeed to the bed and couch of my predecessor: Pray cause the stuffing to be repaired, and the,crutches sliortened for me. The calamity of your gout is what all your friends, that is to fay all that know you, must share in ,• we desire you in your turn to condole with us, who are under a persecution, and much afflicted with a distemper which proves grievous to many poets, aCWticism. We have indeed some relieving^ tervals of laughter, (as you know there are in some diseases*) and it is the opinion of divers good guessers, that the last fit will not be more violent than advantageous; for poets aslail'd by critics, are like men bitten by Tarantula's, they dance on so much the fatter.

Mr. Thomas Burnet hath play'd the precursor to the coming of Homer, in a treatise,, called Homerides. He has since risen very much in his criticisms, and after asfaulting Homer, made a daring attack upon the * What-d'ye-call-it, Yet is there not a proclamation issued for the burningof Hpmtr and the Pope by the common hangmannor is the What dye call-it yet silenc'd by the -Lord Chamberlain. They shall survive the conflagration of his fathers works, and live after they and he are damned j (Tor that the B—p of S. already is so, is the opinion ol

B-p

Pr. Sacheverel and the Church of R

ZctW, &c.

[graphic]

IF your Mare could speak, she wou'd give you an account of the extraordinary company she had on the road; which since she cannot do, I will.

It was the enterprizing Mr. Lintott, the redoubtable rival of Mr. 'fonfon, who mounted onastonehorse,(no disagreeable companion to your Lordship's mare) overtook me in Windsor.for est. He said, he heard I design'd for Oxford, the seat of the muses, and would, as my bookseller, by all means, accompany me thither.

I ask'd him where he got his horse? He answered, he got it of his publisher: "Eor "that rogue my ptinter, (said he) disap.

Inane oskis Papers ctll'd The Grumbler, long sincedeti.

"pointed

*' pointed me s I hoped to put him in good humour by a treat at the tavern, of%a <c browtl frtcastee of rabbits which cost two *' shillings, with two quarts of wine, bexy (ides my conversation. I thought myself ct Cocksure of his horse, which he readily riroriiised rite, but said, that Mr. Tonfbn "bad just such another design of going to a-Cambridge t expecting there the copy of "<a Comment upon the Revelations ^ and ik "Mr. Tonfon went, he wis preirigagcdf-td* ^attendhittij being to have the printing of *t. the said copy.*' ;v

'. So in mbrt, I borrow'd this storiehorse of my publisher, which he had of Mr. Oldmixon for a debt; he lent me too the pretty boy you see after me; he was a sinmty dbg yesterday, and cost me near two hours to. wash the ink off his face: but me Dei> vil is a fair-e6ndition'd Devil, arid very forward in his catechise: if you have any more bags, he shall carry them* - *rf

".-j I thobght Mr. ZJmm's civility not to be* neglected, so gave the boy a, small bagg, tfdntaining three shirts and an Elvezir Vir± pU and mounting in an instant proceeded on the road, with my man before, m$ courteous stationer beside, and the aforesaid

•Devil behind;- .< • *\

^jMr. Lintoit began in thismanrier- " Now '-damn them! what if they should p^ci<

^iatoUhe news-paper, how you and I went

** together

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