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THE

MUSICAL WORLD,

A JOURNAL OF

Music, the Drama, Literature, Fine Arts, Foreign Intelligence, &c.

AND COMPLETE

RECORD OF THE THEATRES AND THE CONCERT ROOM.

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY AT NOON;
TO BE HAD IN WEEKLY NUMBERS, MONTHLY PARTS, AND ANNUAL VOLUMES.

VOLUME XXV.

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY W. S. JOHNSON, “NASSAU STEAM PRESS," 60, ST. MARTIN'S LANE, CHARING CROSS.

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INDEX TO VOL. XXV.

LEADING ARTICLES.

Jenny Lind, 238-Jullien in the Provinces, 239-Madame Dulcken,

Stephen Heller, Pages 1-Jullien in Manchester and Birmingham, 2-

242—Royal Academy, 243-Stephen Heller, 253—Death of Words.

Stephen Heller, 13-Halevy's Val d'Andorre, 13-Alboni, 29-Stephen

worth, 258-Royal Academy, 259-.Madame Dulcken, 260—Music in

Heller, 29-Sacred Harmonic Society, 32-Stephen Heller, 45, 61,

Edinburgh, 263–Our Cotemporaries, 264, Grisi and Mario, 271-Ernst

77, 93-Balfe, 93-Her Majesty's Theatre, 94-St. Martin's Hall, 96

in Dublin, 271-Apothegms, 272-Late Mrs. Edmonds, 276— M. Silas,

-Royal Italian Opera, 109-Stephen Heller, 109-Her Majesty's

280—Moore's Plagiarisms, 281-Exbibition of the Royal Academy, 289

Theatre, 125-Beethoven Quartett Society, 125-Stephen Heller,

Royal Academy and its Professors, 291-Our Contemporaries, 2914

126-Royal Italian Opera, 126-Stephen Heller, 141-Her Majesty's

Moore's Plagiarisms; 297–Exhibition of the Royal Academy, 305-

Theatre, 142-Stephen Heller, 157-Corbari, 156—Leopold de Meyer,

Musical Professorship, 307 - Dr. Mainzer at Manchester, 310

157 — Royal Italian Opera, 160 - Stephen Heller, 173, 205–

Halevy, 321 - Jullien at the Zoological Gardens, 322—The Choral

Vivier, 205-Carlotla, 205-Alboni, 253– Carlotta Grisi, 253-Madlle.

Fund and the Sacred Harmonic Societies, 328 – Alboni, 333_ Vivier,

Denain, 253 - Alboni, 285 - Vivier, 285 — Halery, 285 - Alboni

333-Apothegms, 335-Dreyschock. 335-Mario and Tamberlik, 339

and the Prophet, 301 - Emile Angier, 317 - Spohr, 333 - The

Sacred Harmonic Society, 339-Vivier, 319 -- Verdi at the Royal

Gregorian Chants, 365 -Ernst, 413—Rachel, 413, 429, 445, 461, 477

Italian Opera, 350-Our Cotemporaries, 352-Annual Meeting of the

Vivier, 477, 493 - Madame Fiorentini, 493–Vivier, 541, Alboni, 605,

Charity Schools, 356-Early Development of Musical Genius, 357

-Jetty Tretiz, 621-Ernst, 621,-Grand National Concerts, 621, 637

Moore's Plagiarisms, 360-Mr. Jarrett and the Athenæum, 365-Our
-M. Jullien's Concerts, 701-Rachel, 717--Alooni, 717—Ernst, 732,

Cotemporaries, 365-Queen's College Institution of Ladies, 377
– Vivier, 733-Jetty Treffz, 749–Mr. French Flowers, 765—Massol,

Suirey Zoological Gardens, 385–Molique's New Trio, 386—The late
781–Vivier, 781 – Jenny Lind, 781-Auber's New Opera, 797-

Miss Jane Porler, 387- Haydn, 387-Shakspeare Cookery, by M.
Ernst, 813-Charles Luders, 813-Massol, 813 Dussek, 829.

Scribe, 392–Our Cotemporaries, 349-American Double-grand Piano,

401-The Polka, 402—Moore's Plagiarisms, 408-Surrey Zoological
ARTICLES, ORIGINAL, EXTRACTED, AND TRANSLATED.

Gardens, 417--Jullien at Colchester, 435—Mrs. Glover, 446- An

Anecdote of the Jenny Lind Furore, 418 - Provincial Criticisms,

Ernst, Pages,' 2–Moore's Plagiarisms, 3—Albert Smith and Mr. Shep 449—The National Gallery and the Royal Academy, 450—The Abuses

hard, 4-Mr. Lumley, 15-Jullien in Dublin, 15-An enthusiast for of the Royal Academy, 465–The Polka, 466-A Month at Constan.

Mr. Cooper, 20-Andrew Park, 20—Singers behind the Scenes, 20 linople, 473—The Public Grant to the Private Academy in Trafalgar

Manchester Madrigal Society, 25-Musical Almanack, 25-The Euterpe Square, 479—The Vernon Gallery in Marlborough street, 480–Rachel,

of Herodotus, 33—Stephen Heller, 34- Progress and Influence of 482—Vauxhall Gardens, 484--Signor Onorato Leonardi Paglieri, 493

Music (No. 1), 39-Moore's Plagiarisms, 42-Sacred Harmonic Society, -The Royal Academy and its Professors, 495-Carlotta Grisi's Ariel,

46-Ernst, 47--Stephen Heller, 48-Mrs. Glover, 48-Jullien in 496–Carlotta Grisi's Giselle, 496–Garlotta Grisi's Benefit, 496–

Edinburgh, 49— Death of Mdme. Grassini, 52- Macready's Farewell The Two Italian Operas, 497-Death of Mr. G. Budd, 503- Madame
Performances at Bristol, 55-Moore's Plagiarisms, 56-Mendelssohn, Sontag and Don Giovanni, 504-Jenny Lind, 505-Leda and the
61-Moore's Plagiarisms, 62–Music at Brighton, 66-Balfe at Berlin, Swan, 505-Don Juan in the Theatre, 505 - Glastonbury Abbey,
69-Progress and influence of Music (No. 2), 71-Charles E. Horn, 511 – Marriage of Jenny Lind, 512 — Fiorentini, 512 - Jenny
72-The Purcell Club, 74-Ernst, 79-Windsor Theatricals, 80 Lind, 514-A Musical Prodigy, 515- Don Juan in the Theatre,

Moores's Plagiarisms, 804" St. Paul's" at Manchester, 83–The Old 518-Music in Humble Life, 520-Jenny Lind at Liverpool, 525

Musician, 89-Sacred Harmonic Society, 98—The Old Musician, 103 -Origin of the Royal Academy, 534-Miss Cushman, 536–Jenny

Moore's Plagiarisms, 105-St. Martin's Hall, 111-Progress and Lind at Liverpool, 541 - The Royal Academy, 563 - Sir Martin

Influence of Music (No. 4), 113—Macready in Liverpool, 117 Archer Shee, 569 —The Grand Organ at the Liverpool Collegiate

Beethoven at the Piano, 118-Italian Opera in America, 119-Moore's Institution, 579- New Life and Old Learning, 582 – Gloucester

Plagiarisms, 120-A New Musical Celebrity, 125–Ernst at Mano Musical Festival, 589 — Piccini, 599 - Adolphe Heaselt, 603

chester, 127-Zingarelli and Rossini, 127_Carlotta Grisi at Dublin, -Catherine Hayes, 603 — Jenny Lind in America, 605 -

127 — Mr. Bunn on the Stage, 129–Music at Boulogne-sur-mer, Mrs. W. Clifford, 612-Piccini, 613–Rossini's First Love, 614

129-Sacred Harmonic Society, 130—The Fairy Lily of Calderon, Lablache, 617-Rhuddlan Royal Eisteddvod, 621-Jenny Lind in

136 — Church Music, 137-Music and the Drama in New York, America, 628-Jullien in the Provinces, 631-Jenny Lind's first

141 - Jenny Lind's l'isit to America, 143-Hayd.1, 143-Spohr, Concert in America, 632-Rhuddlan Royal Eisteddvod, 637_Jenny

144, Bologna, 153—Carlotta Grisi, 160—Royal Academy, 162 Lind in America, 641—The Italian Opera at Paris, 645-A Romance

-Ainerican Pot Pourri, 163--M. Billet's Classical Concerts, 163– of Real Life, 645-Jenny Lind in New York, 654-Barnum and Jenny

St. Martin's Hall, 164-Moore's Plagiarisms, 169-Carlo:ta Grisi, 175 Lind, 658-- Jenny Lind in New York, 671-Jenny Lind versus Tripler,
Weber, 178—Mr. R. Hoffman Andrews, 182-Roval Acadeiny, 182– 677- Piccini, 677-Choral Harmonists Society, 685—Jenny Lind in
Catherine Hayes at Limerick, 183–Gardoni, 189—Royal Academy of Boston, 686—Piccini, 688--Jenny Lind in Boston, 701-Jenny Lind
Music, 191-Sacred Harmonic Society, 192—The Royal Academy, 193 and the Americans, 705-New York Gleanings, 712-M. Jullien's Bal
General Theatrical fund, 195-A Sketch of the Philharmonic, 196— Masque, 717-Jenny Lind in America, 718—Catherine Hayes's
Madame Anne Thillon, 196—Comparisons of Dramatic Literature, 201 “Norma," 721-Street Musicians, 722-Opening of the Italian Opera
-Grattan Cooke and the Philharmonic, 215—Royal Academy, 215 in Paris, 733—The Theatres in Paris, 738—Commemoration of the
Comparisons of Dramatic Literature, 216–Moore's Plagiarisms, 217– Organists of St. George's Chapel, Windsor, 740-The Sleeper
Grisi, 225—The Horn of Platt, 230—Benedict, 237-M. Silas, 237–1. Awakened, 749-Music in Paris, 750-St. Martin's Hall, 754-Spohr

Balfe, Macfarren, Loder, Hector, Berlioz, and Felicien David, 767 Soirees, 417-Royal Academy of Music, 418—Beethoven Quartet So-
Sivori, 767-Jenny Lind visiting the Blind, 767—Madame Thillon at ciety, 429-Malle. Anichini's, 430-Mr. T. M. Mudie's, 541-Miss
Willis's Rooms, 768—Catherine Hayes, 770—Jules Janin and “Le Emily Newcombe's at Plymouth, 581-Grand National, 653, 669,
Prophète,774-Exeter Hall, 774-Jetty Treffz, 781-Sacred Har. 685, 701, 717, 734, 751, 765, 782, 798—M. Julien's, 735, 753, 766,
monic Society, 783–Miss Christina Dawson in Glasgow, 785 783, 799-Miss Dolby's Soirees Musical, 801.
Dante, 1786–The Infant Marie, 786–Spohr's Seasons, 787—Kneb-
worth Theatricals, 792–Theatricals at Windsor Castle, 797-Miss

EPIGRAMS FROM THE GREEK.
Goddard. 801-An Ancient Lind Mania, 803—How Charles Kean | PAGES-1, 13, 29.
became an Actor, 809—Theatricals at Windsor Castle, 813—Jenny
Lind Papers, 814-St. Martin's Hall, 817-A Theatre without an

FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE.
Orchestra, 818.

PARIS 665, 788, 821--St. Petersburgh, 788-Milan, 354–Madrid, 797DRAMATIC INTELLIGENCE.

Naples, 293–Leipzic, 436_Verona, 293-Genoa, 293—Venice, 293–

Switzerland, 570—Orleans, 263–Montpellier, 263, 273, 353, 376-HER MAJESTY'S THEATRE-157, 173, 189, 212, 221, 240, 266, 269, 286,

Weimar, 233—Marseilles, 424–New York, 216, 451, 496, 768, 802 302, 317, 336, 369, 381, 393, 416, 431, 447, 462, 479, 504, 509, 535,

- Philadelphia, 819-Brunswick, 200—Mayence, 519-St.Omer, 169—

Tours, 293-Nancy, 168,'185, 263-Caen, 602–Romano, 821- Berlin, 564. Royal ITALIAN OPERA-175, 190, 213, 223, 240,1256, 270, 286, 303,

88, 322, 405, 821-Bucharest, 821-Florence, 646—Havannah, 53, 317, 337, 349, 373, 381, 398, 417, 433, 448, 463, 479, 504, 511, 535,

250_Brussels, 646. 567, 573.

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE. DRURY LANE Pages-6, 82, 99, 115, 131, 166, 206, 230, 248, 273. HAYMARKET PAGES--36, 39, 132, 167, 184, 206, 230, 374, 1435, 576. | Pages 10, 24, 54, 85, 86, 121, 122, 130, 131, 151, 152, 169, 185, 199, 615, 677, 689—(MACREADY'S FAREWELL PERFORMANces)-706, 725,

200, 233, 243, 244, 245, 261, 262,279, 280, 297,309,310,342, 343,360, 742, 756, 777, 791, 805, 823.

377, 389, 390, 391, 405,406, 407, 408, 424, 425, 426, 439, 440, 441, PRINCESSES PAGES-38, 66, 83, 115, 132, 207, 248, 273, 341, 446, 678,

452, 453, 454, 455, 456, 470, 471, 472, 473, 485, 486, 487, 501, 502, 690, 742, 792, 823.

617, 518, 537, 570, 580, 616, 632, 633, 649, 650, 665, 682, 695, LYCEUM-208, 323, 678, 743, 792.

696, 729, 761, 777, 810, 811 839. St. James's PAGES-19, 38, 67, 100, 116, 149, 167, 197, 231, 249, 274,

OUR SCRAP BOOK. 306, 324, 355, 392, 419, 436, 449, 467, 483. ADELPHI-115, 184, 209, 295, 323, 354, 419, 449, 659, 708, 725, 756. Pages, 500, 516, 584, 585, 615, 647, 666, 682, 697, 704, 705, 723, 724, OLYMPIC PAGES-18, 67, 83, 99, 115, 133, 483, 577, 603, 615, 678, 741, 755, 776, 803, 804, 805, 824, 825, 826.

725. Sadler's Wells-99, 116 210, 274, 341, 536, 631, 659, 690, 708,

POETRY. 757.

Sonnets, by N. D., pages 2, 18, 33-Man of Battersea, 6-Boiardo, 53SURREY-116, 210.

Gabriel Fiamma, 65-To William Sterndale Bennett, 109-Garcilaso ASTLEY'S-210.

de la Vega, 113—Ciombattista Zappi, 130—To Amalia Corbari, 131MARYLEBONE--55, 249, 296, 324, 355, 757, 792, 824.

Exeter Hall, 134–To Carlotta Grisi, 136-Musical Enigma, 307– STRAND-55, 116, 149, 167, 209, 231, 249, 295, 323, 375. 419, 499.

Sonnet to Mrs. W. F., 342-Acrostics to Catherine Hayes, 354– CONCERTS.

Luther's Hymn, 359–Miranda's Romance from “La Tempesta," 373

--The Irish Girl, 388-To One Departed, 408-Sonnet, 448-Lines Mr. Willy's Classical, page, 5-London Wednesday, 5-17-M. Billet's from the “Lotos Eaters,” 487-Gaspar Becerra, 788–Christmas

Séances, 25-London Wednesday, 33-Mr. Billet's Soirees, 35—London Carol, 807.
Wednesday, 50-Mr. Thomas's Classical, 53-London Wednesday, 63-

PROVINCIAL INTELLIGENCE.
M. Billet's Soirees, 65-London Wednesday, 78— Society of British
Musicians, 79—M. Billet's Soirees, 97–London Wednesday, 98-Mr.

Pages, 8, 9, 10, 21, 22, 23, 41, 54, 69, 70, 84, 85, 101, 102, 103, 117, Sterndale Bennett's Classical, 109-Mr. Willy's Classical, 111-London

134, 135, 136, 150, 151, 164, 165, 166, 185, 198, 199, 232, 233, 245, Wednesday, 112-Society of British Musicians, 114, 131--Amateur

246, 247, 260, 261, 277, 278, 279, 296, 307, 308, 324, 326, 327, 343, Musical Society, 131-Philharmonic Society, 143-Society of British

355, 389, 404, 421, 422, 423, 438, 457, 469, 488, 489, 537, 567, 568, Musicians, 145- London Wednesday, 146-Molique's Chamber Con

577, 578, 579, 599, 600, 601, 616, 648, 659, 661, 662, 663, 664, 665, certs, 147-Sterndale Bennett's Classical, 147-M. Billet's Soirees, 148

679, 680, 681, 691, 692, 693, 694, 695, 708, 709, 710, 711, 726, 727, -London Wednesday, 161-Mr. Dando's quartet, 16)-Philharmonic

728, 743, 758, 759, 760, 777, 788, 789, 790, 807, 808, 821, 822, 123, Society, 179–Musical Union, 180-Molique's ChamberConcerts, 181– Sterndale Bennett's Classical, 181-M. Billet's Soirees, 182-Concert at

REVIEWS OF MUSIC AND BOOKS. Buckingham Palace, 186–M. Billet's Soirees, 192-London Wednes.

London Wednes. | Pages, 2, 74, 87, 88, 122, 216, 280, 293, 307, 322, 378, 426, 442, 458, day, 211-M. Billet's Soirees, 211-Philharmonic Society, 226_Mo.

| 468, 484, 496, 617, 651, 794, 811, 826.
lique's Chamber Concerts, 227-Mr. G. A. Osborne's, 227-M. Billet's
Soirees, 228–The Musical Union, 228-London Wednesday, 229–

MISCELLANEOUS.
Beethoven quartet Society, 241-Musical Union, 253— Philharmonic
Society, 254–London Wednesday, 275-M. Billet's Soirees, 276–

Pages 11, 12, 27, 28, 44, 58, 59, 74, 75, 90, 91, 106, 107, 122, 123, Philharmonic Society, 287-Musical Union, 290—Royal Academy of 137, 138, 139, 153, 154, 155, 170, 171, 186, 187, 201, 202, 203, 217, Music, 292-London Wednesday, 293— The Misses Birch's, 303–Miss 218, 219, 234, 250, 251, 266, 267, 281, 282, 283, 298, 299, 312, 313, Dolby and Mr. Lindsay Sloper's, 304—Philharmonic Society, 318-The

314, 328, 329, 330, 344, 345, 346, 361, 362, 378, 379, 392, 393, 394, Musical Union, 320-London Wednesday, 320–M. Billet's Soirees, 395, 409, 410, 411, 426, 427, 428, 442, 443, 458, 459, 460, 475, 490, 334—Royal Academy of Music, 340–Mr. Brinley Richards, 351 491, 506, 507, 508, 521, 522, 523, 524, 539, 570, 571, 585, 586, 587, Philharmonic Society, 351-Mrs. Anderson's, 374-Philharmonic So

604, 618, 619, 620, 634, 635, 636, 650, 651, 666, 667, 683, 684, 697, ciety, 383–Mr. Benedict's, 385-Beethoven Quartet Society, 397– 698, 699, 712, 713, 714, 715, 716, 730, 731, 732, 745, 746, 747, 762, Musical Union, 414-Concert at Buckingham Palace, 415-M. Billet's 763, 779, 794, 795, 811, 812, 826, 827, 828, 844.

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EPIGRAM FROM THE GREEK OF MELEAGER. i Steibelt was another original, and perhaps a genius, though Now does the gilly.flower bloom, now also blooms the Narcissus his style is not so individual as that of Dussek, whom he occaLover of shades, now blooi lilies that dwell on the hills.

sionally equalled, if not surpassed, in his ordinary flights, but Now, too, the flower of flowers, one finer than any is blooming

never approached in his highest inspirations. To illustrate Zenophile the belov'd, - loveliest rose of desire ; Meadows, why do you boast of the flowers that newly adorn ye

this opinion we may suggest that the concertos in E and E fat, Here is a girl to surpass every garland of sweets.

J. O. of Steibelt, known as the Storm and the Chasse, are equal if

nct superior to many of the earlier concertos of Dussek, but STEPHEN HELLER,

on the other hand, in a far greater degree of inferiority does (Continued from our last.)

Steibelt's longest and most ambitious sonata-that in E flat, The age of Dussek, as we have termed it, was rich in com- dedicated to Madame Buonaparte-stand in relation to the posers for the pianoforte. Besides Dussek and Clementi, Elegy (op. 61), the Invocation (op. 77), and other grand already mentioned, there were Steibelt, Woelf, Kozeluch, works of Dussek, which approach nearer to Beethoven than Krumpholz, Eberl, and many others, among whom one of the any sonatas for the pianoforte with which we are acquainted. most distinguished by the services he rendered to the instru- Steibelt, however, was immensely popular, and many of his ment was John Cramer. All these produced sonatas. Dussek

smaller sonatas may be safely taken as models. The pianoand Clementi wrote the largest number, and the best; but forte is, besides, indebted to him for a vast number of pagDussek had by far the greatest influence on his cutemporaries.

sages and effects of which later composers have availed themThe characteristics of his style were salient and marked, while,

selves without acknowledgement. His studies, in spite of the like all men of genius,* he had mannerisms, upon which his strong resemblance of some them to those of Cramer, are also imitators fastened exclusively, it being out of their power to as excellent as they are useful. The name of Steibelt, then, copy the ideas that flowed from the springs of his invention must always have an honourable place in the history of the which, however, they, not seldom, either paraphrased or stole | pianoforte. outright.

Woelf, was a composer of merit, and a musician of more Thus the world was deluged with good, bad, and indifferent than ordinary acquirement. He was original, but his origi. imitations of Dussek. Among the good may be cited the nality is somewhat affected

nality is somewhat affected. Many of his productions have sonatas and concertos of John Cramer, who, except in his enjoyed a high reputation among musicians, and most espe

cially a sonata in A flat, with a fugue. This sonata is decidedly poser. Among the indifferent must be ranked the works of a work of thought, but the fugue is quite as dry and laboured Eberl; and still more indifferent, those of Kozeluch and Krum. | as it is ingenious. Woelf possessed great consideration in his pholz, which are also trivial and meagre. The bad would day, but his writings appear to have had very little influence be too numerous to mention; but some notion may be enter- on his contemporaries, to whom his peculiarities did tained of their quantity when we state, that they stood com- very tempting store for petty larceny. or

very tempting store for petty larceny or wholesale theft. paratively in the same relation to Dussek which nine composers | The sonata in F-or rather fantasia, since the first moveout of ten, who have appeared in print during the last fifteen

ment alone is in regular form-called Ne Plus Ultra, was his years, now occupy in relation to Henri Herz, Thalberg, and

most celebrated work, and is that which is best remembered Mendelssohn, respectively. Those musicians, indeed, have

now. At the time it was composed its difficulty was remany sins to answer for, in the facility they have offered to

garded as immense. One of the variations on the popular air, common-place "slop-composers," to exaggerate and fatten on

“ Life let us cherish,” * in the last movement of the sonata, their mannerisms.

seems, by its skips of double' octaves, to have anticipated Clementi, whose general style was somewhat pedantic, and a fantasia of Henri Herz on the romance in Méhul's Joseph. whose learning could not be borrowed, found few imitators;

With all this, however, we are inclined to think that the greater so few that we cannot tax our memory for a single example. I part of Woelil's compositions are likely to remain in oblivion, Nevertheless Clementi was decidedly an original thinker, |

unless some future antiquarian shall valiantly step forward, and and those who compare him with Mozart only declare them

with the spade and shovel of enthusiasm, exhume them from selves incompetent to understand either. Moreover, Clementi,

the grave in which they long have mouldered. at times, almost equalled the inspirations of genius itself, which,

Of the other composers who flourished about this period if we were writing an account of his works, we could prove

there is little to be said. Their merits were small and their by several examples.

influence null. Some of them obtained a popularity as ephe

meral as it was baseless. One of the most popular, however, By men of genius we can only understand those whose gifts of invention and deservedly so, was Abbé Gellenek, who chiefly excelled as enables them to produce things that are at the same time original and a writer of variations on favourite airs. He also wrote sonatas, beautiful,

+ We cannot resist citing the sonata in B minor, Op. 40-one of the finest works ever written for the pianoforte,

T . Which a writer in the Atheneum erroneously attributes to Mozart.

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