Elements of Mental Philosophy: Abridged and Designed as a Text-book for Academies and High Schools

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Harper & brothers, 1842 - 480 страници

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Of certain indefinite feelings sometimes ascribed to the touch
44
Relation between the sensation and what is outwardly signified
45
6
46
Statement of the mode or process in visual perception
47
Of the original and acquired perceptions of sight
48
The idea of extension not originally from sight
49
Of the knowledge of the figure of bodies by the sight
50
Illustration of the subject from the blind
51
Measurements of magnitude by the
52
Of objects seen in a mist 41 Of the sun and moon when seen in the horizon
53
Of the estimation of distances by sight
54
Signs by means of which we estimate distance by sight
55
Estimation of distance when unaided by intermediate objects
56
Of objects seen on the ocean
57
CHAPTER VII
58
Of habit in relation to the smell
59
Of habit in relation to the taste
60
Of habit in relation to the hearing
62
Application of habit to the touch
64
Other striking instances of habits of touch
65
Habits considered in relation to the sight
66
Sensations may possess a relative as well as positive increase of power
68
The law of habit considered in reference to the perception of the outlines and forms of objects
70
Notice of some facts which favour the above doctrine
71
Additional illustrations of Mr Stewarts doctrine
72
CHAPTER VIII
73
Of conceptions of objects of sight
74
Of the influence of habit on our conceptions
76
Influence of habit on conceptions of sight 63 Of the subserviency of our conceptions to description
77
Of conceptions attended with a momentary belief
78
Conceptions which are joined with perceptions
81
Conceptions as connected with fictitious representations
82
SIMPLICITY AND COMPLEXNESS OF MENTAL STATES Section 67 Origin of the distinction of simple and complex 68 Nature and characteristic...
83
Simple mental states not susceptible of definition
84
Simple mental states representative of a reality
85
Origin of complex notions and their relation to simple
86
Supposed complexness without the antecedence of simple feelings
87
The precise sense in which complexness is to be understood
88
Illustrations of analysis as applied to the mind
89
Complex notions of external origin
90
Of objects contemplated as wholes
91
12
92
Instances of particular abstract ideas
93
Mental process in separating and abstracting them
94
General abstract notions the same with genera and species
95
Process in classification or the forming of genera and species
96
Early classifications sometimes incorrect 83 Illustrations of our earliest classifications
97
Of the nature of general abstract ideas
98
The power of general abstraction in connexion with numbers
99
Of the speculations of philosophers and others
100
10
101
Of different degrees of attention
102
Dependence of memory on attention
103
Of exercising attention in reading
104
Alleged inability to command the attention
105
X
107
Dreams are often caused by our sensations
108
Explanation of the incoherency of dreams 1st cause 97 Second cause of the incoherency of dreams
110
Apparent reality of dreams 1st cause
111
Apparent reality of dreams 2d cause
112
Explanation of the preceding statements 114
114
PART II
117
CHAPTER 1
119
Declaration of Locke that the soul has knowledge in itself
120
CHAPTER III
136
Of the use of correlative terms
142
DEMONSTRATIVE REASONING
143
Secondary laws and their connexion with the primary
147
Of complex terms involving the relation of cause and effect
149
Contrast the second general or primary
155
Section
167
Imagination an intellectual rather than a sensitive process
219
Illustration of the subject from Milton
225
Importance of the imagination in connexion with reasoning
229
Of the less permament excited conceptions of sound
235
I
259
PART I
267
CHAPTER III
293
Emotions of cheerfulness joy and gladness
295
Emotions of melancholy sorrow and grief
296
Emotions of surprise astonishment and wonder
297
Emotions of dissatisfaction displeasure and disgust
298
Emotions of regard reverence and adoration
300
Of motion in connexion with the sublime
305
CLASS II
318
THE DESIRES CHAPTER I
319
NATURE OF DESIRES 301 Of the prevalence of desire in this department of the mind
321
Of the place of desires in relation to other mental states
322
The desires characterized by comparative fixedness and perma nency
323
Desires always imply an object desired 306 The fulfilment of desires attended with enjoyment
324
Of variations or degrees in the strength of the desires 308 Tendency to excite movement an attribute of desire
325
Classification of this part of the sensibilities
326
The principles based upon desire susceptible of a twofold
327
eration
328
Instances of instincts in the human mind
330
Further instances of instincts in
331
Of the final cause or use of instincts
332
CHAPTER III
333
Of the prevalence and origin of appetites for intoxicating drugs
334
Of the twofold operation and the morality of the appetites
335
CHAPTER IV
336
Principle of selfpreservation or the desire of continued existence
337
Of the twofold action of the principle of selfpreservation
338
Further illnstrations of the principle of curiosity
339
Of the twofold operation and the morality of the principle of curi osity
340
Imitativeness or the propensity to imitation
341
Practical results of the principle of imitation
342
Of selfishness as distinguished from selflove
352
CHAPTER V
358
Other reasons for checking and subduing the angry passions
365
CHAPTER VI
371
Illustrations of the filial affection
377
Of patriotism or love of country
389
Page
395
PART II
411
389
414
CHAPTER III
424
Feelings of obligation have particular reference to the future
430
Diversities in moral decisions dependent on differences in
436
CHAPTER V
442
THE SENSIBILITIES OR SENSITIVE NATURE
449
Disordered action of the principle of selfpreservation
454
Disordered and alienated action of the possessory principle
455
Disordered action of imitativeness or the principle of imitation
456
Disordered action of the principle of sociality
457
Further remarks on the disordered action of the social propensity
458
Of the disordered action of the desire of esteem
459
Disordered action of the desire of power
460
CHAPTER II
461
Familiar instances of sympathetic imitation
462
Instances of sympathetic imitation at the poorhouse of Harlem
463
Other instances of this species of imitation
464
CHAPTER III
465
Of sudden and strong impulses of the mind
467
Insanity of the affections or passions
468
Of the mental disease termed hypochondriasis
469
Of intermissions of hypochondriasis and of its remedies
471
Disordered action of the passion of fear 446 Perversions of the benevolent affections
473
CHAPTER IV
475
Of accountability in connexion with this form of disordered con science
476
Of moral accountability in cases of natural or congenital moral derangement
479
i

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Страница 240 - Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee : I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling as to sight? or art thou but A dagger of the mind; a false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?
Страница 301 - The voice of the Lord is upon the waters: the God of glory thundereth: the Lord is upon many waters.
Страница 103 - The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark, When neither is attended ; and, I think The nightingale, if she should sing by day, When every goose is cackling, would be thought No better a musician than the wren.
Страница 182 - Lulled in the countless chambers of the brain, Our thoughts are linked by many a hidden chain. Awake but one, and lo, what myriads rise ! * Each stamps its image as the other flies.
Страница 308 - The sun had long since in the lap Of Thetis taken out his nap, And like a lobster boiled, the morn From black to red began to turn," The imagination modifies images, and gives unity to variety ; it sees all things in one, il piti nelV uno.
Страница 120 - This source of ideas every man has wholly in himself; and though it be not sense, as having nothing to do with external objects, yet it is very like it, and might properly enough be called internal sense...
Страница 162 - Time but the impression stronger makes, As streams their channels deeper wear.
Страница 108 - IN Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree : Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea. So twice five miles of fertile ground With walls and towers were girdled round : And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree ; And here were forests ancient as the hills, Enfolding sunny spots...
Страница 225 - Invention is one of the great marks of genius ; but if we consult experience we shall find, that it is by being conversant with the inventions of others that we learn to invent, as by reading the thoughts of others we learn to think.

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