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OUR NAVY IN iHh
WAR WITH SPAIN

S" lift,'

BY ;A
JOHN R^SPEARS

AUTHOR OF "THE HISTORY OF OUR NAVY," ETC.

WITH MORE THAN ONE HUNDRED ILLUSTRATIONS

NEW YORK

CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS

1898

Copyright, 1898, By
CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS

PAGE

Chapter V. Treacherous Destruction Of

The Maine ....... 6i

Our Early Efforts to Remove Anarchy from Cuba—The Maine

Sent to Havana to Protect Americans—The Undisputed Conclusion

of the Court of Inquiry Regarding the Loss of the Maine.

Chapter VI. The Days Just Before The

War _. .81

A Display of Power that was Without Effect Because of Spanish

Obstinacy—$50,000,000 for Defence—A Fleet of Auxiliary War-ships

—How we Learned that we Must Depend on our own Ship-yards—

Sampson in Command—A Combination that Gave the Rest of the

World Pause.

Chapter VII. The War Message . . . 103

Summary of Reasons for American Intervention in Cuban Affairs

—Aggravating Proof of Work of Spanish Spies and Spanish Insin-

cerity—Diplomatic Relations Ended — Threatening Movements of

War-ships.

Chapter VIII. First Shot Of The War . 115

Capture of the Spanish Merchantman Buenaventura by the Gun-

boat Nashville—His Flag Hoisted in Honor of the Fine American

Squadron Betrayed Him—Official Proclamation of the Blockade of

Cuban Ports.

Chapter IX. Brave Work Along Shore . 126

Cutting Cables Within Ninety Feet of the Beach at Cienfuegos

Under the Fire of 1,000 Spanish Soldiers—Wounded who Suffered

in Silence lest Groans Unnerve their Shipmates—The Winslow at

Cardenas—A Torpedo-boat Sent to Cut a Gun-boat from the Piers of

a Well-defended City—A Tale of Rare Heroism and Resourcefulness

—Remarkable Tests of Courage in the Face of Superior Forces

Afloat—Returning Fire from the Shore—At Matanzas and Cabanas.

Chapter X. Dewey At Manila . . . 154

Good Work of the Baltimore's Men Aided by the British in Hong

Kong—Precautions on the Way to Manila—A Night Attack on our
Squadron—The Scene at Dawn—When Montojo Became Desperate

—Wretched Use of Mines and Torpedo-boats—A Striking Exhibit of

the Repose of Conscious Power—Christening of the Baby Battle-ship

—Spanish Views of the Conflict.

PAGE

Chapter XI. Sampson's First Search For

Cervera 194

A Squadron with the Speed of a Ton-of-coal Barges Sent in a Chase

of Twenty-knot Spanish Cruisers—The Bombardment of San Juan de

Porto Rico—Work of Inexperienced Men that Showed their Mettle

—Another Vain Cruise to Nicholas Channel.

Chapter XII. The Oregon's Famous Run . 213

A Race Against Time, 14,700 Miles Long with Never a Break or a

Loss of a Turn of her Wheels—Men who Worked for Twenty-four

Hours at a Stretch More than Once in that Cruise —A Boiler-maker in

a Live Furnace—Shots that Gave Life to Fainting Firemen—Along-

shore Signal Service.

Chapter XIII. Schley's Cruise To Santiago 221

Reasons for his Delay at Cienfuegos—Stopped Twenty Miles from

his Destination and then Started Back to Key West—Break on the

Collier—Dash of the Marblehead—When Schley saw Cervera's Ships

at Anchor Within Easy Range—A <( Reconnaissance " at a Range of

from Four to Five Miles—A Blockading Squadron Ten Miles from

Port—Acts of Auxiliary Cruisers Described.

Chapter XIV. The Blockade Of Santiago . 239

Disposition of the Squadron—The Story of Hobson's Futile Brav-

ery—It was Another Proof that Culture and Cool Courage go Hand

in Hand—The Forts Bombarded—Good Work of the Vesuvius.

Chapter XV. The Marines At Guantanamo 259

Our First Armed Force to Maintain a Hold on Cuban Soil—The

Bay Captured by the Marblehead and Yankee—It was Hot Work for

a Week—The Spaniards in the Brush—Assault on a Funeral Cortege

—Spanish Woods Station Captured, and Caimanera's Fort Destroyed

—A Torpedo in the Propeller of the Texas:—Good Health of this

Force on Shore.

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