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PREFACE.

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The work entitled “ The Age of Fable" tempt to convey so much knowledge of the gods and goddesses, heroes and heroines, of antiquity, as a welleducated gentleman or lady of the present day has occasion for; and to do it in such a way as not to encroach upon the time wanted for graver studies. For this purpose, the fables of mythology were told in the form of entertaining stories, which young people, and others who need this species of information, were invited to read for amusement, not as a study, or a task. To each of the stories one or more quotations from the poets of our own language were appended, alluding to the story, or using it as an illustration. These citations were calculated to call the reader's attention to the leading facts of the story, and, being in the form of poetry, were the better adapted to fix themselves in the memory. But they were necessarily brief, and others equally apt and attractive were omitted for want of room.

This volume presents these poetical citations and illustrations, increased in number and in length. Such a collection, it is thought, may be useful in recalling to memory the contents of the former volume, and in testing for each reader the extent of his or her acquirements in mythologic lore. If in any one of these three hun

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PRE FACE.

work entitled “The Age of Fake convey so much knowleigs heroes and heroines, of enimman or lady of the green

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dred selections an allusion should occur which is not understood, an explanation will be found by turning to the name of the hero or heroine in the Index to the Age of Fable, and reading the story over again, which it is hoped will not be an irksome task.

A poet has told us, “ A thing of beauty is a joy forever.”

Abundant proof of the truth of this remark will be found in these pages. Let us take but one instance. The poet (Ovid) who first told of the abduction of Proserpine, added, in a single line, that the loss of the flowers which she had been gathering increased her grief. This incident, so simple and natural, has so impressed itself on the imagination of succeeding poets and artists, that it has ever since been an unfailing accompaniment the story, whether told by pencil, pen, or plastic art; and allusions to it will be found of frequent recurrence in all literature. Specimens of these may be seen at page 67, which might have been multiplied indefinitely, had our space permitted.

This book is intended to be read in connection with the former volume of the same author, — the Age of Fable. But it may be read independently by those who have already some acquaintance with mythology, or, in place thereof, with such help as the conversation of a parent or elder brother or sister may supply. It is hoped that the collection of so many gems of fancy from the whole range of British and American poets will afford gratification, as well as instruction, to the reader.

The Grecian mythology is so intimately connected with the works of the greatest poets, that it will continue to be interesting as long as classical poetry exists, and must form an indispensable part of the education of the man of literature, and of the gentleman. - BURKE.

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Actæon
Admetus
Adonis
Æneas
Æolus
Æson
Ajax .
Alcestis
Amazons.
Amphion.
Amphitrite.
Apollo
Arachne
Arethusa.
Argonauts
Argus
Ariadne
Arion
Aristaus
Atalanta
Avatar

40
34

C.
22 Cadmus
184 Calypso
. 176 Castor and Pollux
. 146 Cephalus.
154 Ceres.

51 Circe
. 200 Cleopatra's Barge
. 194 Clyt'i-e

6 Creüsa
31 Cupid
19 Cybele
68 Cyclops.
145
25

D.
110 Danaë
193 Dædalus
187 Daphne
. 110 Diana
. 233 Dido

Dodona
Druids

116
164
74
40
63
163

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B.

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E.

Bacchus
Baldur
Bards
Basilisk

01
241
247 Echo..
225 | Egeria

28
128
183
23

14
. 50, 171

69
. 117

33
35
183
215
215

105
77

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