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ALDRICH, T. B., 304, 360.

“ CHRISTIAN GLOBE," 320.

“ AMERICAN MESSENGER,” 157. CLEMENS, S. L., 347.
ANONYMOUS, 50, 60, 81, 89, 163, COLERIDGE, S. T., 341.

171, 202, 210, 212, 236, 272, 273, CORNWALL, B., 191.
283, 287, 290, 300, 302, 330, 332, COWPER, W., 363.
354, 365, 374, 405.

CRAM, MRS. M., 328.
ARNOLD, M., 68.

DENTON, P., 56.
AYTOUN, W. E., 175.

DEWEY, O., 180.

BAILEY, J. M. (The Danbury | DICKENS, C., 97, 159, 400.

News"

Man), 355.

DOBELL, S., 44.

BEECHER, H. W., 61.

EDDY, T. M., 218.

BOKER, G. H., 308.

EvArts, W. M., 337.
“ BOSTON TRANSCRIPT," 127. EVERETT, E., 193.
BOUCICAULT, D., 389.

FARNINGHAM, MARIANNE, 345.

BOWLES, S., 120.

FRENCH, MRS. V. L., 317.

BROOKS, Rev. E. G., 321.

FROST, S. A., 293.

BROWNING, R., 72.

GOUGH, J. B., 95.

BROWNING, MRS. E. B., 268. GREENWOOD, GRACE, 148.

BRUCE, W., 385.

HALE, S. J., 195.

BRYANT, W. C., 241.

HAMILTON, G., 406.

BURKE, E., 222.

HART, J. S., 267.

BURRITT, E., 108.

HARTE, BRET, 244, 305, 350.

BYRON, 189.

HEINE, 57, 88.
CARY, ALICE, 102, 343.

HOLLAND, J. G., 398.
Cary, PHEBE, 165, 253.

HOLMES, O. W., 376.

“ CHAMBERS' MISCELLANY," 275. HOOD, T., 246.

CHANNING, W. E., 308.

HOWE, J. W., 162.

Hows, G. W., 380.
Hugo, V., 33, 46, 150.
INGELOW, JEAN, 384.
IRVING, W., 40, 311.
JAMESON, MRS., 85.
KEELER, F. L., 59.
KNOWLES, J. S., 92.
LEIGHTON, A., 316.
LONGFELLOW, H. W., 36, 63, 233.
LOWELL, J. R., 125, 247, 249.
LYNN, ETHEL, 128, 339.
MACAULAY, T. B., 393.
MONTGOMERY, J., 78, 93.
MORRIS, G. P., 112.
MOSELY, L., 255.
“ NEW YORK OBSERVER," 144.
“ New YORK TRIBUNE," 185.
O’HALLIGAN, JUDY, 387.
PERCIVAL, J. G., 39.
PHELPS, ELIZABETH S., 223.
Pope, A., 188.
QUINCEY, T. DE, 377.

REED, H., 307.
ROBERTS, SARAH, 77.
Scott, SIR W., 94, 206.
SHAKESPEARE, 140, 182, 190, 193,

358.
SHEPPARD, C., 131.
SIGOURNEY, Mrs. L. H., 232, 251.
Smith, H., 239.
SOUTHEY, CAROLINE, 369.
SOUTHEY, R., 229.
STREET, A. B., 279.
TALMAGE, T. DE WITT, 326, 367.
TENNYSON, A., 323.
TROWBRIDGE, J. T., 106, 197.
WARNER, C. D., 334.
WEBSTER, D., 75.
WHITTIER, J. G., 53, 134, 215, 235,

288, 407.
WILSON, SUSAN, 114.
Wirt, W., 29E.
WOLCOT, 243.
WORDSWORTH, W., 262.

INTRODUCTION.

THE

THE

following selections illustrate the principal varieties of STYLE found throughout the Reader. The language of prose being less imaginative than poetry, demands less variety of tone. The thought-analysis with the application of principles, which serve to convey the meaning to the understanding, is the chief end to be kept in view.

As, however, no thought can arise in the mind without a certain degree of emotion, it is important that the tone of voice be so adapted to the sentiment as to dispel the mechanical and monotonous utterance which sometimes pervades the reading of prose.

Familiar talk, dramatic selection, simple narrative, and descriptive extracts, serve to arouse interest and give ease and naturalness to the tone.

Let the pupil acquire a correct tone through a comprehension of the thought and feeling, and a knowledge of principles which apply to the expression, rather than by mere imitation.

The examples marked for the Rhetorical Pause, Inflections, and Emphasis, together with selection illustrating Expressive Tone in Emotional Reading, are suggestive of the method of study and practice of other selections. For single examples of application of principles, see " MANUAL."

COLLOQUIAL STYLE.

LIGHT CONVERSATION WITH A HEAVY MAN. “CHARLOTTE, my dear, there is a ring at the hall-bell,” said Mrs. Shawford, the morning after a ball. “Who can it be?Perhaps the Sydenhams — no! it is Henry Waring.-- What shall we do? He is so very heavy, and is always calling." (The servant announced Mr. Henry Waring.)

“How do you do?" inquired Mrs. Shawford. “I hope Mrs. Waring and Eliza are quite well.”

Quite well, I thank you." “I hope they are not fatigued. It was so very kind of Mrs. Waring to stay so late. Eliza looked exceedingly well : I think she has quite recovered.”

“ Yes." “Been shooting to-day?”. "No." “Pray, is it true, Mr. Henry Waring,” inquired Charlotte, that Dewhurst Hall is taken ?" I don't know." “Very great thing for the neighborhood, if it be."

“Yes."- (A pause.) “ Beautiful weather," remarked Mr. Henry Waring.

"Very fine, indeed," agreed Mrs. Shawford. “When do your family go to town?”

“ Next week."

"I hope we shall induce papa to take us soon,” said Charlotte ; “I want to hear Paganini.”

“ Yes.”
“ Have you heard him?"
“No."
“He must be very wonderful."
“ Yes."
You are fond of music, I believe ?"

Pretty well."- (Pause the second.) "The Dean ages, I think,” observed Mrs. Shawford, with a sigh.

“I think he does."

I suppose William Rushton will soon return," observed Miss Charlotte Shawford.

“I suppose he will,” replied Mr. Henry Waring.- (Pause the third.)

“ Pray, is there any talk of Donnington balls this year ?" “I don't know.”

They were very pleasant.". “Yes, very." -- (Pause the fourth.)

"Have you heard anything of your cousin ?" inquired Mrs. Shawford.

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"Believe they had a letter the other day.”
"I hope he is quite well ?"
Yes, quite well."
"I suppose the important day will soon arrive now ?”
“I suppose it will." -- (Pause the fifth.)

“Will you take some luncheon, Mr. Waring ? - It is in the dining-room." “Thank you, I have lunched."

How does John like Oxford ?" “Oh! I don't know:

pretty well." “Great change!" · Yes."-- (Pause the sixth.) “Sure you will not take any luncheon ?”

“No, thank you. Good-morning, Mrs. Shawford: Goodmorning, Miss Shawford.”

Good-morning. Pray remember us most kindly at home.” Yes,- Good-morning;” and he retired.

“Very heavy man is Mr. Henry Waring,” observed Mrs. Shawford.

"Shocking!" said Charlotte.

Earnest Conversation with Vivid Narrative.

66

THE MISSING SHIP. It was long before the cable stretched across the ocean, when the steamers did not make such rapid runs from continent to continent, that the ship Atlantic was missing.

She had been due in New York for some days, and the people began to despair.

The Atlantic has not been heard from yet!” “What news from the Atlantic on Exchange ?” “None.” Telegraph despatches came in from all quarters. Any news from the Atlantic ?And the word thrilled along the wires to the hearts of those who had no friends on board, "No."

Day after day passed, and people began to be excited, when the booming of the guns told that a ship was coming up the Narrows. People went out upon the Battery and Castle Garden with their spy-glasses; but it was a British ship, the Union Jack

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