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364 Which over, bacon flitch, in Statfordshire, who cobiid
• Whole Duty of Man,' that excellent book turundi

Whom she helped to some tansy, in the eye of all the
Sir Roger's opinion of her, that she cither desäras to
A letter from the president of it to the Spectator, becer

A custom to punish uncbaste onez in Berkshire and De

100 / William and Betty, & short account of their amour,

No.
Temper, serious, the advantage of it.
Temperance the best preservative of health,

598 Valetudinarians in society, not to be admitted into company

195
W bat kind of temperance the best,

but on conditions,
Templar, one of the Spectator's club, his character,

195 Vanity, the paradise of fools,
Temple (Sir William), his rule for drinking,

A vision of her and her attendants,
T'en called by the Platonic writers the complete number,

195 Vapours in women, to what to be ascribed,

1
Tender hearts, an entertainment for them,

221 Variety of men's actions proceeds from the passiers
Tenure, the most slippery in England,

627 Varilas, his cheerfulness and good-humour mate hin gere
Terence, the Spectator's observations on one of his plays,

rally acceptable,
Terror and pity, why those passions please,

502 Ubiquity of the Godhead considered,
418

Further considerations about it,
Thales, his saying of truth and falsehood,
Tharoes, its banks, and the boats on it described,

504k Venice Preserved,' a tragedy founded on a wrong with
That, his remonstrance,

454 Venus, the charming figure she makes in the first Em !!

80
Theatre (English), the practice of it in several instances cen-

An attendant on the spring,

Verses by a despairing lover,
sured,

42, 44,51

On Phoebe ang Colin,
of making love in the theatre,

602
Themistocles, his answer to a question relating to the mar-

Translation of verses pedantic out of Italien,

The Royal Progress,
rying his daughter,

311

To Mrs.
Theodosius and Constantia, their adventures,

on her grotto,

164 Vertumnus, an attendant on the spring,
Theognis, a beautiful saying of his,

464 Ugliness, some speculations upon it,
Thiinbleton (Ralph), his letter to the Spectator,

432 Vice as laborious as virtue,
Thinking aloud, what,
Thoughts, of the highest importance to sift them,

211 Villacerfe (Madame de), an account of her death, and the
399

manner of it,
Thrash (Will) and his wife, an insipid couple,
Thunder, of great use on ibe stage,

522 Vinci (Leonardo), his many accomplishments, and remat

able circumstance at his death,
Thunderer to the playhouse, the hardships put upon him,
and his desire to be made a cannon,

Viner (Sir Robert), his familiarity with King Charles II.
Tickell (Mr), his verses to the Spectator,

36 Virgil, his beautiful allegories foundeil on the Phloeie plata
532

sophy,
Tillotson (Archbishop), improved the notion of heaven Wherein short of Homer,
and hell,

447

His fable examined in relation to Halicarnassus' liar
Time, our ill use of it,

93 of Æneas,
The Spectator's direction how to spend it,

93

His genius,
How the time we live ought to be computed,

Compared with Homer,
Title-page (Anthony), his petition to the Spectator,

304 When he is best pleased,
"Titles, the significancy and abuse of them,

480 Virtue, the exercise of it recommended,
Tom Tie, to personate singing birds in the Opera,

Its influence,
Tom Touchy, a quarrelsome fellow,

122 Its near relation to decency,
Tom Trnsty, a tender husband and careful father,

The most reasonable and genuine source of, honel.
Tom Tulip, challenged by Dick Crastin,

91 Of a beautiful nature,
Flies into the country,

91 The great ornaments of it,
Tom the Tyrani, first minister at the coffee-house between To be esteemed in a foe,
the hours of eleven and twelve at night.

49 When the sincerity of it may reasonably be suspected
Tombs in Westminster Abbey visited by the Spectator, 26 The way to preserve it in its integrity,
His reflections upon them,

The ust of it in our afflictions,
Toper (Jack), his recommendatory letter in behalf of a ser. Virtues, supposed ones not to be relied on,
vant,

493 Vision of human misery,
Torre, in Devonshire, how unchaste widows are punished

Visit: a visit to a travelled lady, which she received is bet
there,

614 bed, described,
Torture, why the description of it pleases, and not the pros. Vocifer, the qualifications that make him pass for a fise gel
pect,

418

tleman,
Townly (Frank), bis letters to the Spectator,

560 Volumes: the advantage an author receives from pobliskia?
Trade, the benefit of il to Great Britain,

his works in volumes, rather than in single picts

,
Trading and landed interest ever jarring,

174 Understanding, the abuse of it is a great evil,
The most likely means to make a man's private for. Wherein more perfect than the imagination,
tune,

283 Reasons for it,
Tradition of the Jews concerning Moses,

237 Should master the passions,
Tragedy: a perfect tragely the noblest production of bu. Universe, how pleasing the contemplation of it,
man nature,

39 Uranius, his great composure of his soul,
Where in the modern tragedy exceeds that of Greece and Vulcan's dogs, the fable of them,
Rome,

39
Blank verse the most proper for English tragedy, 39 WAGERING disputants exposed,
The English tragedy considered,

39 Wall, the prodigious one of China,
Tragi-cometly, the product of the English thcatre, a mon. Wars, the lare, nade us so greedy of news,
strons invention,

40 Wasps and doves, in public, who,
Transmigration, what,

211 Wealth, the father of love,
The transmigration of souls asserted by Will Honey Wealthy men fix the character of persons to their listat
comb,

stances,
How believed by the ancients,

408 Wedlock, the state of it ridiculed by the town withers
Trap (Mr.). his letter to Mr. Stint,

1:48 Weed (Ephraim), bis letter to the Spectator about his Pin
Travel, highly necessary to a coquette,

riage and estates,
The behaviour of a travelled lady in the playhouse, 45 West Entorne, in Berkshire, a custom tbere for windows
At what time travelling is to be undertakin, and the true

What Lord Coke said of the widows' tenure there,
ends of it,
Travellers, the generality of then exploded,

474 to it,
Trees, more beautiful in all their luxurianey than when cut Whisperers, political,
and trimmed,

414 Whispering place, Dionysius the tyrant's,
Trimming, che Sprctator unjustly accuseil of it,

445 White (Moll), a notorious witch,
Trueby (Widow), her water recommended by Sir Roger as Who and which, their petition to the Spectator,
good against the stone and gravel,

329
Truepenny (Jack). strangely good natured,
Trunk.maker, a great man in the upper gallery in the play.

Widow (le), her manner of captivating Sir Roger de ce
house,

2.35 verley,
Truth, an enemy to false wit,

63 Her behaviour at the trial of her cause,
The everlasting good effect truth has even upon a man's Her artifices and beauty,
fortune and interest.

352

Too desperate a scholar for a country gentlemaa,
Always consistent with itself,

352

Her reception of Sir Roger,
The excellence of it,

507
Tryphidorus, the great lipogrammatist of antiquity,

country,
Tully praises himself,

562

Has been at the death of several fores,
What he said of the immortality of the soul,
Of uttering a jest,

616

marry or she does not,
of the force of novelty,

626 Widows, the great game of fortune-hunters

,
What he required in his orator,

633 Widows' club, an account of it,
Turner (Sir William), his excellent maxim,

509
Tyrants, why so called,

508

her suitors,

Duty of widows in old times,
VAINLOVES, the family of,

454
Valentinus (Basilins), and Alexandrinus, their story,

ronshire,
Valerio, his character,

Instances of their riding the black ram there,
Valetudinarians in chastity,

395 Wig, long one, the eloquence of the bar,
Valetudinarians in society, who.

69

343

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No.

516
108

108
119
126
131

154
156
182
247

38

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62

No.
William II). King of England, compared with the French Women, their usual conversation,

15
King

Their
strongest passion,

33
can Pimble (Will), his letter to Sir Roger de Coverley,

Not to be considered merely as objects of sight,

33
His character,

108 Women (the English), excel all other nations in beauty, 81
His conversation with the Spectator,

Signs of their improvement under the Spectator's hand, 92
A man of ceremony,

The real commendation of a woman, what, 95, 104
Thinks the Spectator a fanatic,

Their pains in all ages to adorn the ontside of their
And fears he has killed a man,

heads,

98
All Vine, not proper to be drank by every one that can swallow, 140 More gay in their nature than men,

128
Vinter gardens, recommended, and described,

477 Not pleased with modesty in men,
Wise men and fools, the difference between them,

225 Their ambition,
Nise (Mr.), the gardener, an heroic poel,

477 Deluding women, their practices exposed,
Vit, the mischief of it when accompanied with vice,

23

Women great orators,
Very pernicious when not tempered with virtue and hu Have always designs upon men,

433
manity,
23 Greater tyrants to their lovers than husbands,

486
Turned into deformity by affectation,

Reproved for their neglect of dress after they are mar.
Only to be valued as it is applied,

ried,

506
The history of false wit,

6 Their wonderful influence upon the other sex,
Nothing so much admired and so little understood, 58 Words, the abuse of them demonstrated in several instances, 373
Every man would be a wit if he could,

The pleasures proceeding to the imagination from the
The way to try a piece of wit,

ideas raised by them,

416
Mr. Locke's reflection on the difference between wit and Work necessary for women,

606
judgment,

62 World (the), considered both as useful and entertaining, 387
The god of wit described,

The present world a nursery for the next,

111
The many artifices
and modes of false wit,

220 World of matter, and life, considered by the Spectator, 519
May purchase riches, but is not to be purchased by Writer, how to perfect the imagination,
riches,

522 Who among the ancient poets had this faculty,
Vit (false), why it sometimes pleases,

416 Writing, the difficulty of it to avoid censure,
Nothing without judgment,

419 Writing unintelligibly, the art of it much improved, 379
Vits, minor, the several species of them,

Wits ought not to pretend to be rich,
Voman, the utmost of her character wherein contained, 342

XENOPHON, his school of equity,

337
The notion some women have of virtue and vice, 390

His account of Cyrus's trying the virtue of a young lord, 664
A definition of woman by one of the fathers,

265
The general depravity of the inferior part of the sex, 274 YARICO, the story of her adventure,
They wholly govern domestic life,

320 Yawning, a Christmas gambol,
Voman of quality, her dress the product of a hundred cli-

Youth, instructions to them to avoid harlots,

69
Voman's man described,

156
His necessary qualifications,

156 ZEAL, intemperate, criminal,
Yomen the more powerful part of our people,

Zemroude (Queen, her story out of the Persian Tales'
Their ordinary employments,

10 Zoilus, the pretended critic, had a very long beard,
Smitten with superficials,

63

417
417
668

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509

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399
578
331

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