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Libels, those that write or read them excommunicated,
Liberality, wherein the decency of it consists,
The true basis of it,

Liberty of the people, when best preserved,
Library: a lady's library described,

Liddy (Miss), the difference between her temper and that of
her sister Martha, and the reasons of it,

Lie given, a great violation of the point of honour,
Several sorts of lies,

Life: the duration of it uncertain,

In what manner our lives are spent, according to Se
neca,

Not real but when cheerful,

In what manner to be regulated,

How to have a right enjoyment of it,

A survey of it in a vision,

To what compared in the Scriptures, and by the heathen
philosophers,

The present life a state of probation,

We are in this life nothing more than passengers,
Illustrated by the story of a travelling dervise,
The three important articles of life,

Eternal life what we ought to be most solicitous about,
Man's not worth his care,

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Valuable only as it prepares for another,
2ght and colours only ifleas of the mind,

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Condon (Mr.), the gardener, an heroic poet,
ongings in women, the extravagancies of them,
Longinus, an observation of that critic,

ottery, some discourse on it,

Love, the general concern of it,

illie (Charles), his present to the Spectator,
indamira, the only woman allowed to paint,
ion in the Haymarket occasioned many conjectures in the
town

Very gentle to the Spectator,

ivy, in what he excels all other historians,
Logic of kings, what,

Coller (Lady Lydia), her memorial from the country infirm-

ary,

London, an emporium for the whole earth,

The differences of the manners and politics of one part
from the other,

A crossed one retires,

Lover's leap, where situated,

An effectual cure for love,
A short history of love,

Loungers, a new sect of philosophers in Cambridge,
Luxury, what,

Attended often with avarice,
A fable of those two vices,

The luxury of our modern meals,

Lying, the malignity of it,

Party-lying, the prevalency of it,
Lysander, his character,

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Our hearts misled by a love of the world,
A passion never well cured,

Natural love in brutes more intense than in reasonable
creatures,

The gallantry of it on a very ill foot,
Love has nothing to do with state,
The transport of a virtuous lover,

In what manner discovered to his mistress by one of Will
Honeycomb's acquaintance,

Love, the mother of poetry,

The capriciousness of love,

The romantic style in which it is made,

A nice and fickle passion,

506

A method proposed to preserve it alive after marriage, 506
Love casuist, some instructions of his,
Lover, an account of the life of one,

falvolio, his character,

lan, a sociable animal,

The loss of public and private virtues owing to men of

parts,

Man variable in his temper,

The merriest species of the creation,

The mercenary practice of men in the choice of wives,
Men differ from one another as much in sentiment as
features,

Wonderful in his nature,

The two views he is to be considered in,

An active being,

His ultimate end,

ailius, his character,

ple (Will), an impudent libertine,
ch(month of), described,

The homage he owes his Creator,

By what chiefly distinguished from all other creatures,
Suffers more from imaginary than real evils,

His subjection to the female sex,

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409, 420
239

506

The foundation of community,

522

For what reason liable to so much ridicule,

522

219

Some further thoughts of the Spectator on that subject, 525
237 Mars, an attendant on the spring,

425

289 Martial, an epigram of his on a grave man's being at a lewd
play,

289

317 Masquerade, a complaint against it,
The design of it,

575

575 Master, a good one, a prince in his family,

575

A complaint against some ill masters,

413 Matter, the least part of it contains an unexhausted fund,
The basis of animals,

358

41 May, a month extremely subject to calentures in women,
The Spectator's caution to the female sex on that
account,

Dangerous to the ladies,

Described,

13
13

Mazarine (Cardinal), his behaviour to Quillet, who had re-
flected upon him in a poem,

Meanwell (Thomas), his letter about the freedoms of married
men and women,

Memoirs of a private country gentleman's life,

403 Memory, how improved by the ideas of the imagination,
477 Men of the town rarely make good husbands,

326 Merab, her character.

339 Merchant, the worth and importance of his character,
191 Merchants of great benefit to the public,

30 Mercy, whoever wants it has no taste of enjoyment,
27 Merit, no judgment to be formed of it from success,
118 Valuable, according to the application of it,
Merry part of the world amiable,
Messiah,' a sacred eclogue,

429

63

479

The advantages of it preferable to a single state, 479, 500
Termed purgatory by Tom Dapperwit,

482

The excellence of its institution,

490

The pleasure and uneasiness of married persons, to what
imputed,

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His description of the archangel and the evil spirits ad-

141

dressing themselves for the combat,
Mimicry (art of), why we delight in it,

408

85 Mind (human), the wonderful nature of it,

631 Minister, a watchful one described,

288 Minutius, his character,

128 Mirth in a man ought always to be accidental,

238

9

The awkward pretenders to it,
Distinguished from cheerfulness,
Mirza, the visions of,

6 Mischief rather to be suffered than an inconvenience,
162 Misfortunes, our judgments upon them reproved,
249 Mixt wit described,

196 Mixt communion of men and spirits in Paradise, as described

by Milton,

264 Mode, on what it ought to be built,

264

467

203

425

No.
593

466

139

261

268

149

377

475 Method, the want of it, in whom only supportable,

479

The use and necessity of it in writings,
Seldom found in coffee-house debates,
Military education, a letter about it,
591, 607 Mill to make verses,

596 Miller (James), his challenge to Timothy Buck,

225

627 Milton's Paradise Lost: the Spectator's criticisms and ob
servations on that poem, 267, 275, 279, 285, 291, 297, 303,
309,315, 321
His subject conformable to the talents of which he was
master,

His fable a master piece,

"A continuation of the Spectator's criticism on 'Paradise
Lost,'
327, 333, 339, 345, 351, 357, 363, 369
The moral of that poem, and length of time contained
in the action,

The vast genius of Milton,

. His poem of Il Penseroso,'

A standing mode of dress recommended,
Moderation a great virtue,

408

441 Modesty, the chief ornament of the fair sex,

441

In men no ways acceptable to the ladies,

494
505

Self-denial and modesty frequently attended with unex-
pected blessings,

510
519

588

624

624

446

8
8
107
137

420

519

365

417

522
144
428

69, 174

456

293

340

Modesty the contrary of ambition,

A due proportion of modesty requisite to an orator,
The excellency of it,

Vicious modesty, what,

The misfortunes to which the modest and innocent are
often exposed,
Distinguished from sheepishness,
The definition of modesty,

365

395

425

23

430

622

598

378

610

417

421

595

595

476

476

476

566

220
436

315
315

369
417
425

463
416
554

439

422

196

358

381

159
564

483
62

12
6
129
312
6
154

206
206

231
231

231

242

373
373

Modesty, wherein it consists,
Modest assurance, what,
The danger of false modesty,
Distinguished from the true,

An unnecessary virtue in the professors of the law,
The sentiments entertained of it by the ancients,
Rules recommended to the modest man by the Spec-
tator,

Mohock, the meaning of that name,

Several conjectures concerning the Mohocks,
Moliere made an old woman a judge of his plays,
Money: the Spectator proposes it as a thesis,
The power of it,

The love of it very commendable,
Monsters, novelty bestows charms on them,
Incapable of propagation,

What gives satisfaction in the sight of them,
Montague, fond of speaking of himself,

Scaliger's saying of him,

Monuments in Westminster Abbey examined by the Spec-

tator,

Those raised by envy the most glorious,
Moorfields, by whom resorted to,
Morality, the benefits of it,

Strengthens faith,

More (Sir Thomas), his gaiety at his death, to what owing,
Mortality, the lover's bill of,
Mothers justly reproved for not nursing their own chil
dren,
Motion of the gods, wherein it differs from that of mortals,
according to Heliodorus,
Motteux (Peter), dedicates his poem on tea to the Spec
tator,

Motto, the effects of a handsome one,
Mourning the signs of true mourning generally misunder
stood,

The method of mourning considered,
Who the greatest mourners,

Mouse Alley doctor,

Much cry but little wool, to whom applied,

Muli Moluch. Emperor of Morocco, liis great intrepidity in
his dying moments,

Music banished by Plato out of his commonwealth,

Of a relative nature.

Music (church), of the improvement of it,

It may raise confused notions of things in the fancy,
Recommended,

Musician (burlesque), an account of one,

NAKED shouldered,

Names of authors to be put to their works, the hardships and
inconveniences of it,

Nature, a man's best guide,

The most useful object of human reason,

Her works more perfect than those of art to delight the
fancy,

Yet the more pleasant the more they resemble them,
More grand and august than those of art,

Necessary cause of our being pleased with what is great,
new, and beautiful,

Needlework recommended to the ladies,

A letter from Cleora against it,
Neighbourhoods, of whom consisting,

Nemesis, an old maid, a great discoverer of judgments,
New or uncommon, why every thing that is so raises a plea-

sure in the imagination,

What understood by the term with respect to objects,
Improves what is great and beautiful,

Why a secret pleasure annexed to its idea,
Every thing so that pleases in architecture,
Newbery (Mr.), his rebus,

New-river, a project for bringing it into the play house,
News, how the English thirst after it,

Project for a supply of it,

Of whispers,

The pleasure of news,

Newton (Sir Isaac), his noble way of considering infinite

space.

Nicholas Hart, the annual sleeper,
Nicodemuncio's letter to Olivia,
Nicolini, his perfection in music,

Nicolini (Signior), his voyage on pasteboard,

His combat with a lion,

Why thought to be a sham one,

An excellent actor,

Night, a clear one described,

Whimsically described by William Ramsay,
Night-walk in the country,

Nightingale, its music highly delightful to a man in love,
Nigranilla, a party-lady, forced to patch on the wrong

side,

No, a word of great use to women in love matters,
Novels, great inflamers of women's blood,
Novelty, the force of it,

November, (month of), described,

Nurses: the frequent inconveniences of hired nurses,
Nutmeg of delight, one of the Persian emperor's titles,

No.

390 Obscurity, the only defence against reproach,
Often more illustrious than grandeur,

373

418 Orbicilla, her character,

562 Order, necessary to be kept up in the world,

562 Ostentation, one of the inhabitants of the paradise of fools,
Otway commended and censured,

d

His admirable description of the miseries of law-suits,
Overdo, a justice at Epping, offended at the company
strollers for playing the part of Clodpate, and making
a mockery of one of the quorum,

458 Obsequiousness in behaviour considered,
458 Ode (Laplander's), to his mistress,

484 Economy, wherein compared to good-breeding,
484 Ogler: the complete ogler,

Old maids generally superstitious,
484 Old testament in a periwig,
324 Omniamante, her character,

347 Opera, as it is the present entertainment of the English

70

stage, considered,

442

The progress it has made on our theatre,
Some account of the French opera,
450 Opinion (popular) described,

450

412 Opportunities to be carefully avoided by the fair sex,
413 Orator, what requisite to form one,

452

452

457

625

OATES (Dr.), a favourite with some party-ladies,
Obedience of children to their parents, the basis of all go-

189

vernment,

26

355

505

459

465 Ovid. in what he excels,

349

377

His description of the palace of Fame,

His verses on making love at the theatre, translated by
Mr. Dryden,

246

How to succeed in his manner,
Outrageously virtuous, what women so called,
369 Oxford scholar, his great discovery in a coffee-house,

411

412

412

413

415

59

5

349

18

operas,

Parties crept much into the conversation of the ladies,
An instance of the malice of parties,
The dismal effects of a furious party-spirit,
It corrupts both our morals and judgment,
And reigns more in the country than town,
Party zeal very bad for the face,
Party patches,

Party scribblers reproved,

413 Party not to be followed with innocence,
606 Party prejudices in England,
609 Passion relieved by itself,
49 Passionate people, their faults,
Nat. Lee's description of it,

483

Passions, the conquest of them a difficult task,
The various operations of them,
The strange disorders bred by our passions when not re
gulated by virtue,

h

24

extinguish
It is not so much the business of religion to
as to regulate our passions,

The use of the passions,

414
414

414

29

405

416

630

570

487

451

404

408


221

552 PAINTER and tailor often contribute more than the pod
to the success of a tragedy,
Pamphilio, a good master,

J

d

95 Pamphlets, defamatory, detestable,

64 Pantheon at Rome, how it strikes the imagination at the first

entrance,

64
444

(3
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Paradise of fools,

251

Paradise Lost' (Milton's), its fine images,

Parents, their taking a liking to a particular profession often
occasions their sons to miscarry,

Naturally fond of their own children,

u

Too mercenary in the disposal of their children in mas
⚫riage,
Too sparing in their encouragement to mastery for the
well educating their children,

Their care due to their children,

Parnassus, the vision of it,

Particles (English), the honour done to them in the late


f

The passions treated of,

What moves them in descriptions most pleasing,
In all men, but appear not in all,

Of hope and fear,

The work of a philosopher to subdue the passions,
Instances of their power,

564 Passions of the fan, a treatise for the use of the author's

184

scholars,

433 Patience, an allegorical discourse upon it,

405

Her power,

13

5 Patrons and clients, a discourse on them,
Worthy patrons compared to guardian angels,

13 Paul Lorrain, a design of his,

13 Peace, some ill consequences of it,

565 Pedantic humour,

582 Pedants, who so to be reputed,

425 The book-pedant the most supportable,

383 Pedants in breeding as well as learning,

Peepers described,

81 Peevish fellow described,

625 Penelope's web, the story of it,

365 Penkethman, the comedian, his many qualifications,

626 Penseroso' (poem of), by Milton,

246 People, the only riches of a country,
425 Pericles, his advice to the women,
160 Persecution in religious matters immoral,
Persian children, what learnt by them in their schools,
57 Persian soldier, reproved for railing against an enemy,
Persians, their instruction of their youth,

Their notions of parricide,

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Person, the word defined by Mr. Locke,

Persons, imaginary, not proper for an heroic poem,
Petition of John a Nokes and John a Stiles,

577

Petition from a cavalier for a place, with his pretensions to it, 629
Petronius and Socrates, their cheerful behaviour during their
last moments grounded on different motives,
Petticoat, a complaint against the hoop petticoat,

Several conjectures upon it,

nature,
Phocion, his behaviour at his death,

Compared to an Egyptian temple,

Petticoat politicians, a seminary to be established in France, 305 Poor, the scandalous appearance of them,
Pharamond, memoirs of his private life,

His great wisdom,

Some account of him and his favourite,
His edict against duels,

Phebe and Colin, an original poem by Dr. Byrom,

Phidias, his proposal for a prodigious statue of Alexander,
Philautia, a great votary,

Philips (Mr.), pastoral verses of his,

His pastorals recommended by the Spectator,
Philopater's letter about his daughter's dancing,
Philosopher's, why longer lived than other men,
Philosophy, the use of it,

Said to be brought by Socrates down from heaven,
The use of natural philosophy,
The authors of the new philosophy gratify and enlarge
the imagination.

The boast of pagan philosophers that they exalt human

His notion of popular applause,

His saying of a vain promiser,

Physic, the substitute of exercise or temperance,
Physician and surgeon, their different employment,
The physicians a formidable body of men,

Compared to the British army in Cæsar's time,

Their way of converting one distemper into another,
Physiognomy, every man in some degree master of that art,
Picts, what women so called,

No faith to be kept with them,

Picture not so natural a representation as a statue,

What pleases most in one,

Pictures, witty, what pieces so called,
Piety an ornament to human nature,
Pindar's saying of Theron,
Pin money condemned,

Pinkethman to personate King Porus on an elephant,
Pisistratus, the Athenian.tyrant, his generous behaviour on
a particular occasion,

Pitch-pipe, the invention and use of it,
Pittacus, a wise saying of his about riches,
-Pity, is love softened by sorrow,

That and terror leading passions in poetry,
The reasonableness of pity,

Place and precedency more contested among women of an
inferior rank than ladies of quality,
Places of trust, who most fit for them,

Why courted by men of generous principles,
The unreasonableness of party-pretences to places,
Planets, to survey them fills us with astonishment,
Planting recomniended to country gentlemen,
Plato, his notion of the soul,

Wherein, according to him and his followers, the punish
ment of a voluptuous man consists,

His account of Socrates's behaviour the morning he was
to die,

His description of the Supreme Being,
His saying of labour,

Players in Drury Lane. their intended regulations,

Wherein to be condemned,

The precedency settled among them,
Playhouse, how improved in storms,
Pleaders, few of thera tolerable company,
Pleasant fellows to be avoided,

Pleasantry in conversation, the faults it covers,
Pleasure, when our chief pursuit, disappoints itself,

The decittiness of pleasure,

Pleasure and Pain, a marriage proposed between them, and

concluded,

Pliny, the necessary qualifications of a fine speaker accord-
ing to that author,

His leater to his wife's annt, Hispulla,
Plutarch, for what reproved by the Spectator,
Poems in picture,

The chief things to be considered in an epic poem,
Several poems preserved for their similes,
Poetesses (Eugish), wherein remarkable,
Pony has the whole circle of nature for its province,
Poets (English), reproved,

Their artifices,

Ba poets given to envy and detraction,

The chief qualification of a good poet,

The pams they should take to form the imagination,
Should mend nature, and add to her beauties,
How much they are at liberty in it.

Polite imagination let into a great many pleasures the vulgar

are not capable of,
Politicians, the mischief they do,

Some at the Royal Exchange,
Politics of St. James's coffee-house, on the report of the

French king's death,
Of Giles's.

No.

578 Politics of Jenny Man's,
357
Of Will's,

Of the Temple,
Of Fish street,
Of Cheapside,
Of Garraway's,

349

127 Poll, a way of arguing,

127 Polycarpus, a man beloved by every body,

127 Pontignan (Monsieur), his adventure with two women,

86

41

41

583, 589
90

90

634

133

188

448
195

16 Precipice, distant, why its prospect pleases,

21 Prediction, the many arts of it in use among the vulgar,
21 Prejudice, the prevalency of it,

25

Prerogative, when and how to be asserted with honour,
A letter about it, as it respects parties in England,
Pride, a great nemy to a fine face,

76 Pope (Mr.), his miscellany commended by the Spectator,
76 Popular applause, the vanity of it,

84 Posterity, its privilege,

603

97 Poverty, the inconveniences and mortifications usually at-
tending it,

415

The loss of merit,

79 Powell (senior), to act Alexander the Great on a drome-
dary,

400

528

His artifice to raise a clap,

466 Powell (junior), his great skill in motions,

195

7

His performance referred to the opera of Rinaldo and
Armida,

10 Power, despotic, an unanswerable argument against it,
393 Practice and example, their prevalency on youth,
Praise, the love of it implanted in us,

420

411

556

568

A generous mind the most sensible of it,
Why not freely conferred on men till dead,
When changed into fame,

119
469

469

629

420

A man crazed with pride a mortifying sight,

416

A chief spring of action in most men,

418 Printing encouraged by the politest natious in Europe,
244 Procrastination, from whence proceeding,

201 Procuress, her trade,

467 Prodicus, the first inventor of fables,

295 Professions, the three great ones overburdened with practi-
tioners,

31

Projector, a short description of one,

527 Promisers condemned,

Prayers, Phoenix's allegorical description of them to Achilles
in Homer,

The folly and extravagance of our prayers in general,
make set forms necessary,

228 Promises (neglect of) through frivolous falsehood,

574 Pronunciation necessary to an orator,

397 Proper (Will), an honest tale bearer,

418

Prospect, a beautiful one, delights the soul as much as a de-
monstration,

588

Wide ones pleasing to the faney,

Enlivened by nothing so much as rivers and falls of

water,

That of hills and valleys soon tires,

Prospect of peace, a poem on that subject commended by the
Spectator,

Prosperity, to what compared by Seneca,
Proverbs (the 7th chapter of) turned into verse,
Providence, demonstrative arguments for it,
Not to be fathomed by reason,

Prudence, the influence it has on our good or ill fortune in
the world,

183

Psalm 114th, translated,

507
624 Psimist, against bypocrisy,
Of Providence,

36

502 Punch, out in the moral part,

529 Punchinello frequented more than the church,

592 Punishments in schools disapproved,

197 Punning much recommended by the practice of all ages,
In what age the pin chiefly flourished,

462

A famous university much infested with it,

462
151

151

Why banished at present out of the learned world,
The definition of a pun,
Whose privilege,

A pun of thought,

By whom panning is affected,

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QUACK bill,

Doctors, the cheats of them,

Au essay against quacks by Dr. Z. Pearce,

Quakers, project of an act to mary them to the olive beau-
ties,

418

Qualities, what are truly valuable,
418 Quality no exemption from reproof,

Is either of fortune body, or mind,

61
61
61

61
61

396

183

454

504

484 Punsters, their talents,

504

525 Puss, speculations on an old and a young one,

626

483 Puzzle (Tom), a fost eminent immethodical disputant,
58 Pyramids of Egypt,

470

415

421
51
419

267 Pythagoras, his precepts about the choice of a course of life, 447
His advice to his scholars about examining at night what
they had done in the day,

586

39, 40

44
253

314

417

14

287
337

38, 467

238
349

551

391

391
418
505

101

432

480
33
201

394

367

151
205

183

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Queries in love answered,

575

Question, a curious one started by a schoolman about the
choice of present and future happiness and misery,
Quidnunc (Thomas), his letter to the Spectator about news, 625
403 Quir (Peter de), his letter to the Spectator about puns,
403 Quixote (Don), patron of the Sighers' club,

396

765

No.
403

403

403

403

411
411

523

237

410

120

237

448

448

541

19

412
412

293

461

399

441

14
14

157

444
444

572

396

340
34
219
625

21

31

403

403

239

280
90
430

523

188

101

150

464

31

40
14

1

766

RABELAIS, his device,
Rack, a knotty syllogism,

Raillery in conversation, the absurdity of it,

Rainbow, the figure of one contributes to its magnificence,
as much as the colours to its beauty,
Rake. a character of one,

Raleigh (Sir Walter), his opinion of woman-kind,
Ramble, from Richmond by water to London, and about it,
by the Spectator,

it,

Not to be found in brutes,

The pilot of the passions,

A pretty nice proportion between that and passion,
Rebus, a kind of false wit in vogue among the ancients,

And our own countrymen,

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Ramsey (William), the astrologer, his whimsical description

of night,

40

290

IF

Rants considered as blemishes in our English tragedies,
Rape of Proserpine,' a French opera, some particulars in it, 29
Raphael's cartoons, their effect upon the Spectator,
The excellence of his pictures,
Rattling club got into the church,

226, 244

Scipio, his judgment of Marius when a boy,
Scornful Lady,' the Spectator's observations at that play, 29
467 Scot (Dr.), his Christian life, its merits,
630 Scotch, a saying of theirs,

472

Read (Sir William), his operations on the eyes,
Readers divided by the Spectator into the mercurial and sa-
turnine,

179

Reason, instead of governing passion, is often subservient to

6 Self-denial, the great foundation of civil virtue,
120 Self love transplanted, what,

408

The narrowness and danger of self-love,
408 Semanthe, her character,
59 Semiramis, her prodigious works and

powers,

59 Sempronia, a professed admirer of the French nation,
The match-maker,

A rebus at Blenheim house condemned,

Recitative (Italian), not agreeable to an English audience,
to be adapted

Recitative music in every language oug
to the accent of the language,
Recreation, the necessity of it,
Religion, the greatest incentive to good and worthy actions,
Considered,

A morose melancholy behaviour, which is observed in se
veral precise professors of religion, reproved by the
Spectator,

494

The true spirit of religion not only composes, but cheers
the soul,

494

426

431

487

487

Riding, a healthy exercise,

Riding dress of ladies, the extravagance of it,
Rival mother, the first part of her history,
Robin, the porter at Will's coffee-house, his qualification,
Roman and Sabine ladies, their example recommended to the

British.

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Romans; an instance of the general good understanding of
the ancient Romans,

Rosalinda, a famous Whig partisan, her misfortune,
Rosicrucius, the story of his sepulchre,

A pretended discovery made by a Rosicrucian,
Rowley (Mr.), his proposals for a new pair of globes,
Royal Exchange, the great resort to it,

Royal Progress,' & poem,

Rusticity shocking,

SAINT Paul's eloquence,

Salamanders, an order of ladies described,
Sallust, his excellence,

Salmon (Mrs.), her ingenuity,
Salutation, subject to great enormities,
Salutations in churches censured,
Sanctorius, his invention,

Santer (Mrs.), a great snuff-taker,
Sappho, an excellent poetess,

Dies for love of Phaon,

Her hymn to Venus,

A fragment of Sappho's translated into three different

languages,

Satire, Whole duty of Man' turned into one,
Satires, the English, ribaldry and Billingsgate,
Panegyrical on ourselves,

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The stability of it, if well founded,

Retirement, the pleasure of it where truly enjoyed,

A dream of it,

611

Revelation, what light it gives to the joys of heaven,
Revenge of a Spanish lady on a man who boasted of her
favours,
Rhubarb (John, Esq.), his memorial from the country in-
firmary,
Rich (Mr.), would not suffer the opera of Whittington's Cat'
to be performed in his house, and the reason for it,
Rich: to be rich, the way to please,

429

5

The advantages of riches,

280 Shakspeare, wherein inimitable,
Excels all writers in his ghosts,
His excellence,

283

The art of growing rich,

283

The proper use of riches,

294 Shalum the Chinese, his letter to the Princess Hilpa before

B.

The defects of rich men overlooked,

464

Richelieu (Cardinal), his politics made France the terror of
Europe,

305

Riches corrupt men's morals,

464

Ridicule, the talent of ungenerous tempers,

249

The two great branches of ridicule in writing,
Put to a good use,

- 249
445

115

435

91

59

29

29
258

356
459

382

218

218
4

425
600

81

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September (month of), described,

Servants, the general corruption of their manners,
Assume their master's title,

Some good among the bad ones,

Influenced by the example of their superiors,
The great merit of some servants in all ages,
The hard condition of many servants,

Sexes: amity between agreeable persons of different sexes

dangerous,

The different degrees of sense in the several different
species of animals,
Sentry (Captain), a member of the Spectator's club, his che

S

1

racter,

His account of a soldier's life,

His discourse with a young wrangler in the law,
He receives a letter from Ipswich, giving an account of

18

an engagement between a French privateer and a
httle vessel belonging to that place,
His reflections on that action,

Takes possession of his uncle Sir Roger de Coverley's

estate,

The advantages of it to each,
Sextus Quintus (the Pope), an instance of his unforgiving
temper,

Shadows and realities not mixed in the same piece,

in Westminster Abbey,

Shows and diversions lie properly within the province of the

Spectator,
Sickness, a thought on it,

398 Sidney (Sar Philip), his opinion of the song of Chery Chase,

the Flood,

Sherlock (Dr.), the reason his discourse of death hath bre
so much perused,

SH

Improved the notion of heaven and hell,
Shoeing horns, who, and by whom employed,

Shovel (Sir Cloudesley), the ill contrivance of his monument

Verses on his modesty,

Sighers, a club of them at Oxford,

Their regulations,

Sight, the most perfect sense,

The pleasures of the imagination arise originally

502

from it,

81
379
574

Furnishes it with ideas,

552 Sight, second, in Scotland,

620
400
449

69 Sign posts, the absurdity of many of them,
Silk-worm, a character of one,
Similitudes, eminent writers faulty in them,
The preservation of several poems,
An ill one in a pulpit,
Simonides, his satire on women,
Sincerity, the great want of it in conversation,
The ad antages of it over dissimulation and deceit,

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The most compendious wisdom,

An instance of it in a north-country gentleman,

Rusty (Scabbard), his letter to the Spectator,
Rynsault, the unjust governor, in what manner punished by
Charles, Duke of Burgundy, his sovereign,

491

633

198

409 Singularity, when a virtue,

28

259 Sippet (Jack), his character,

460 Slavery, what kind of government the most removed from it,"

25 Sloven, a character affected by some, and for what reason,

344

The folly and antiquity of it,

223 Sly, the haberdasher, his advertisement to young gentlemen
in the last year of their apprenticeship,

223

223 Sly (John), the tobacconist, his representation to the Spee

tator,
His minute,

229

568 Smithfield bargain, in marriage, the inhumanity of it,
451 Snape (Dr.), a quotation from his charity sermon,
473 Snailers,

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235

53

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The excellency of it considered in relation to dreams,
fait Sounds, how improper for description,

Spaceia della Bestia triomphanie,' a book sold at an auction
for thirty pounds,

-the Spe

Some account of that book,

Space, infinite, Sir Isaac Newton's noble way of considering

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3

Few persons capable of a religious, learned, or philoso-
phie solitude,

Solomon's Song,' a paraphrase on the second chapter,
Song with notes,

Sophocles, his conduct in his tragedy of' Electra,'
Sorites, what sort of figure,

Sorrow, the outward signs of it very fallacious,
Soul, the immortality of it evidenced from several proofs,
Its happiness the contemplation of God,

State of it after separation,

No.

Snuff box, the exercise of it, where taught,
Socrates, his temper and prudence,

138 Spectator (The), his invitation to all sorts of people to assist
him,

28
133

His behaviour at his execution,
His speech to his judges,

About the stamps,
Guardian of the fair sex,

146
183

His advertisements,

His notion of pleasure and pain,
The effect of his temperance,

195

His instruction to his pupil Alcibiades in relation to
prayer,

207

A catechetical method of arguing introduced first by
him,

Instructed in eloquence by a woman,

Why the oracle pronounced him the wisest of men,
Head of the sect of the hen pecked,
His domestics, what,

The effect a discourse of his on marriage had with his
audience,

His saying of misfortunes,

Soldiers, when men of sense, of an agreeable conversation,
Solitude: an exemption from passions the only pleasing so-
litude,

it,

Sparkish (Will), a modish husband,

Sparrows bought for the use of the opera,

Spartan virtue acknowledged by the Athenians,
Spartan justice, an instance of it,

Spartans, the method used by them in the education of their

children,

Spectator (The), his prefatory discourse,

His great taciturnity,

His vision of public credit,

His entertainment at the table of an acquaintance,
His recommendation of his speculations,

Advertised in the Daily Courant,

His encounter with a lion behind the scenes,

The design of his writings,

No party man,

A little unhappy in the mould of his face,
His artifice,

His desire to correct impudence,

And resolution to march on in the cause of virtue,
His visit to a travelled lady,

His speculations in the first principles,

An odd accident that befell him at Lloyd's coffee-
house,

His advice to our English Pindaric writers,

His examen of Sir Fopling Flutter,

His inquisitive temper,

His account of himself and his works to be written 300
years bence,

His great modesty,

He accompanies Sir Roger de Coverley into the

country,

His exercise when young,

He goes with Sir Roger a hunting,

And to the assizes,

His description of a French puppet newly arrived,
His opinion of our form of government and religion,
Sometimes taken for a parish sexton, and why,
His reflections upon Clarinda's journal,
Accompanies Sir Roger to Westminster Abbey,
His sacrifices to humanity,

His behaviour under reproach, and reasons for not re-
turning an answer to those who have animadverted on
his paper,

His contemplations on Good-Friday,

The benefits accruing to the public from his specula

tions,

His papers much sought for about Christmas by all his
neighbours,

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His comparison of the world to a stage,

He accompanies Sir Roger to Spring-garden,

His zeal for the Hanover succession,

239

247

408

479

486

500

558

152

264

388

389
389

470

44
239
95

111

413

413

487

416

564

479

5

4

6

564

101
101

65

85

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Speech, the several organs of it,

Spenser, his advice to young ladies under the distress of de-
famation,

His whole creation of shadowy persons,

Despised by great men,

307

Spirit, an high one, a great enemy to candour,
1 Spirits, the appearance of them not fabulous,
Several species in the world besides ourselves,
3 Spleen, a common excuse for dulness,

1

Its effects,

Spies, not to be trusted,

7

10 Spring, the pleasantest season of the year,

12

13

16 Spring garden, a kind of Mahometan paradise,

16 Spy, the mischief of one in a family,

17 Squeezing the hand, by whom first used in making love,

19 Squires (rural), their want of learning,

20 Stamps, how fatal to weekly historiaus,

34 Starch, political, its use,

A description of it,

His attendants,

45 Starers reproved,

46 Stars (fixed), how their immensity and magnificence con-
found us,

46 A contemplation of the stars,

58 State (future), the refreshments a virtuous person enjoys in
prospect and contemplation of it,

Statira, in what proposed as a pattern to the fair sex,
Statuary the most natural representation,
Stint (Jack) and Will Trap, their adventure,
Stoies discarded all passions,

Stores of Providence, what,

218

261

262
265

266 Surprise, the life of stories,

277

106 Story-tellers, their ridiculous punctuality,
115 Strife, the spirit of it,

116 Stripes, the use of them on perverse wives.

122 Stroke, to strike a bold one, what meant by it,

His adventure with a crew of gipsies,

130 Sublime in writing, what it is,

The several opinions of him in the country,

His return to London, and fellow-travellers in the stage-
coach,

131 Sudden (Thomas, Esq.) his memorial from the country
infirmary,
132 Sukey's adventure with Will Honeycomb and Sir Roger de
Coverley,

429

His soliloquy upon the sudden and unexpected death of a
friend,

410

133

Sun, the first eye of consequence,

250

His artifice to engage his different readers,

179

412

The character given of him in his own presence, at
coffee-house near Aldgate,

a

Sun rising and setting, the most glorious show in nature,
Superiority reduced to the notion of quality,
To be founded only on merit and virtue,

219

202

His aversion to pretty fellows, and the reason of it,

His acknowledgments to the public,

His advice to the British ladies.

His adventure with a woman of the town,

Superstition, the folly of it described,

An error arising from a mistaken devotion,
Has something in it destructive of religion,

Susanna, or Innocence Betrayed to be exhibited by Mr.
Powell, with a new pair of Elders,

287

289 Sweaters, a species of the Mohock club,

323 Swingers, a set of familiar romps at Tunbridge,
329 Symmetry of objects, how it strikes,
355 Syncopists, modern ones,

Syneopius, the passionate, his character,

Syracusan prince jealous of his wife, how he served her,

355
356 TALE-BEARERS censured,

Talents ought to be valued according as they are applied,
367 Taste (corrupt) of the age, to what attributed,
Taste of writing, what it is, and how it may he acquired,
The perfection of a man's taste as a sense,
Defined,

367
370
383

That of the English,

384 Tears, not always the sign of true sorrow,

767

7
201
213
538

14
332

492

411

567

438

579

439
172

140, 208

409
409

409

409
95

420

565

186
41
416

448

397

243

138

197

479

319

592

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