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5301

How affectes relitudes,

tion of a scholar, who was in election to be admitted

The several degrees of it in several diffcrent animal
416 Invitation, the Spectator's, to all artiGoers as well as philos
624 Jolly (Frank, Esq.), his memorial from the country

211 Journal: a week of a deceased citizen's jounal pretested

NO.
Hesiod's saying of a virtuous life,

447 Jealousy, how to be allayed,
Heteroptie, who so to be called,

250 An Exquisite turment,
Hilpa, the Chinese antediluvian princess, her story, 584 Jest, how it should be uttered,
Her letter to Shalu,

585 Jesuits, their great sagacity in discovering the talent of a
Historian, in conversation, who,

136

young student,
The most agret able talent of an historian,

420 Jews, considered by the Spectator in relation to their dur
How history pleases the imagination,

420

ber, dispersion, and adherence to their religieu,
Descriptions of batiles in it scarcely ever understood, 428 The reasons assigned for it,
History, secret, an odd way of writing one,

619 The veneration paid by them to the name of God,
Hobbes (Mr.), bis observations on laughter,

47 Jezebels, who so called,
His notions debase human nature,

588 Jill, a penitent one,
Hobson (Tobias), the Cambridge carrier, the first man in Jilts described,
England who let out hackney-horses,

509 Iliad, the reading of it like travelling through a country un
His justice in his employment, and the success of it, 509 inhabited,
Hockley in the hole gladiators.

436 Tul-nature, an imitator of zeal,
Homer: his excellence in the multitude and variety of his Imaginary beings in poetry,
characters,

273

Instances in Ovid, Virgil, and Milton,
He degenerates sometimes into burlesque,

279 Imagination, its pleasures in some respects equal to those of
His descriptions charm more than Aristotle's reason. the understanding, in some preferable,
ing,

411 Their extent,
Compared with Virgil.

417 The advantages of the pleasures of imagination,
When he is in his province,

417

What is meant by them,
Honestus, the trader, his character,

443 Two kinds of them,
Honeycomb (Will). his character,

Awaken the faculties of the mind, without fatigung
His course with the Spectator in the playhouse,

perplexing it,
His adventure with a Pict,

More conducive to health than those of the understand
Throws his watch into the Thames,

77 ing,
His knowledge of mankind,

105

Raised by other senses as well as the sight,
His letter to the Spectator,

131 The cause of them not to be assigned,
His votion of a man of wit,

151

Works of art not so perfect as those of nature to enter
His boasts,

151 tain the imagination,
His artifice,

156 The secondary pleasures of the faney,
His great insight into gallantry,

265

The power of it,
His application to rich widows,

311

Whence its secondary pleasures proceed,
His dissertation on the usefulness of looking-glasses,

325
His observation upon the corruption of the age,

of a wider and more universal nature than those it has

when joined with sight,
He gives the club'a brief account of his amours and dis-

How poetry contributes to its pleasures,
appointments,

359
His adventure with Sukey,

How historians, philosophers, and other writer,
410
The delight it takes in enlarging itself by degrees

, es in
Resolved not to marry without the advice of his
friends,

the survey of the earth, and the universe,

475 When it works from great things to little,
His translation from the French of an epigram written

Where it falls the understanding,
by Martial, is: honour of the beauty of his wife Cleo-
patra,

490
His letters to the Spectator,

As liable to pain as pleasure ; how much of either it o

499, 511 capable of,
Marries a corner girl,
Honour to be described only by negatives,

The power of the Almighty orer it,
The genealogy of true honour,

35 Imagining, the art of it in general,

35 Imnia, the daughter of Charles the Great, her story,
And of false honour,
Wherein commendable,

35 Immortality of the soul, arguments in proof of it,
99 The benefits

arising from a contemplation of it,
And when to be exploded,
Honours in this world under no regulation,

99 Impertinent and trifling persons, their triumphis
Hoods, coloured, a new invention,

219 Impertinents, several sorts of them described,

265 Impudence gets the better of modesty,
Hope, passion of, treated,
The tolly of it when misemployed on temporal objects, 535

An impudence committed by the eyes,
Instanced in the fable of Alnaschar, the Persian glass-

The definition of English, Scotch, and Irish impudente,

Recommended by some as good breeding,
man,

535
Hopes and fears necessary passions,

Distinguished from assurance,

224
Horace, takes fire at every hint of the Iliad and Ollyssey,

The most proper means to avoid the imputation of its

417 Mistaken for wit,
His recommendatory letter to Claudius Nero in behalf of
his friend Septimus,

Independent minister, the behaviour of one at his examin

493
Hotspår (Jeffrey, Esq.), bis petition from the country infir-

into a college of which he was governor
mary.
Hudibres, a description of his beard,

429 Indian kings, some of their observations during their say
334

here,
Hun in nature, the same in all reasonable creatures,
The best study,

Indifference in marriage not to be tasted by sensibile spa,
408

rits,
Iluma! is not regarded by the fine gentleinen of the age,
Hunguripod) be best companion in the country,

520 Indigo, the merchant, a man of prodigious intelligence,
The wo axtremes of humour,

424 Indiscretion, more hurtful than ill nature,
Burisque,

617 Indisposition ; a man under any, whether real or imaginary,
Pedeti,

616 ought not to be admitted into company,
Hunting, 1!" use of it,"

617 Indolence, what,

116
Repored

An enemy to virtue,
Husband, -1) Il custom among them,

583 Infidelity, another term for ignorance,
Rilles ur marrying then by the Widow's club,

178 Infirmary one for good humour,
Quilte necessary to make good ones,

A farther account of it from the country,
Hush Peter), his character,

607 Ingolstan (Charles), of Barbicarı, his cures,
Hymen, a trengerul deity,

457 Ingratitude, a vice inseparable from a lustful mind,
Hynın, Davidi's pastoral one on Providence,

530 Initial letters, the use party.writers make of them.
On gratitude,

An instance of it,
On the of the heaven and earth,

Criticisms tipon it,
Hypocrisy, the honour and justice done by it to religion,

465 Injuries, how to be measured,
The various kinds of hypocrisy,

243/ Inkle and Yar co, their story,
To be preferred to open impiety,

299 Innocence, and not quality, an exemption from reproví,

458 Inquisitive tenipers exposed,
IAMBIC vers, the most proper for Greek tragedies,

Instine, the power of it in brutes.
James, how polished by love.
Jane (Mrs.), a great pickthank

71 Integrity, great care to be taken of it,
lapis's cure of Æneas, a translation of Virgil, by Mr. Dry.

272 Interest, otion a promoter of persecution,
den.

The ready way to promolecour

interest in the world in
Ichneumon, a great destroyer of crocodiles' eggs,

572 Intrepidity of a just good man taken from Horace,
Ideas, how a whole set of them hang together,

126 Invention, the most painful action of the mind,
Idiot, the story of one by Dr. Plot,

447
Idiots, in great request in most of the German courts,

phers, to assist him,
Idle and innocent, few know how to be so,

A general one,
Idle world,

411 John a Nokes and John a Stiles, their petition,
Idleness, a great distemper,
Idol: coffee house idols,

ary.
Idolatry, the oftspring of mistaken devotion,

87 Jonson (Ben), an epitaph written by him on a lady:
Idols, who of the fair sex so called,
Jealousy described,

by Sir Andrew Freeport to the Spectator's clel,
170 The use of such a journal,

Landscape
Language

Langu
Laplando

Lah (Squ

471

for
Latimer,

Pat
latin of
Laughter

A 1011
Wbit

A pot

The ti

Liike
Lawsuits,
Lawyers

Bob
Leat (grei
Learning

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151

24
24
24
25
27
28
28
30

425
425
558
559
559
207

30
36

.

479

43
46
46

48
48

94

48
52
52
52

94

287

53
53
53

115
188
207

53

66

16

71

87

No.

No.
Iras, her character,

404 Letter from Tho. Kimbow,
Irish gentlemen, widow-hunters,

561 Fron. Will Fashion to his would-be acquaintance,
Irony, who deal in it,

438 From Mary Tuesday on the same subject,
ee. Irresolution, froro whence arising,

From a valetudinarian to the Spectator,
Irus's fear of poverty, and effects of it,

114 From some persons to the Spectator's clergyman,
The great artifice of Irus,

264 From one who would be inspector of the sign-posts,
Isadas, the Spartan, his valour,

564 From the master of the show at Charing-cross,
Italian writers, florid and wordy,

5 From a member of the Amorous club at Oxford,
29.1. Julian, the emperor, an excellent passage out of his Cæsars, From a member of the Ugly club,

32
relating to the imitation of ihe gods,

634 From a gentleman to such ladies as are professed beau.
July and August (months of), described,

ties,

33
June (month of), described,

From the Spectator to T. D. containing an intended re-
* Jupiter, his first proclamation about griefs and calamities,

gulation of the playhouse,
His second,

From the playhouse thunderer,
His just distribution of them,

From the Spectator to an affected very witty man, 38
Jupiter Ammon, an answer of his oracle to the Athenians,

From a married man, with a complaint that his wife
Justice, to be esteemed as the first quality in one who is in a

painted,
post of power and direction,

From Abraham Froth, a member of the Hebdomadal
The Spartans famous for it,

564 meeting in Oxford,

From a husband plagued with a gospel-gossip,
BEKENNET (Dr.), his account of the country wakes, 161

From an ogling-master,
Kimbow (Thomas), states his case iu a letter to the Spec.

From the Spectator to the president and fellows of the
tator,
24 Ugly club,

48
Em King Lari'a tragedy, suffers in the alteration,

40

From Hecatissa to the Spectator,
Kissing.dances censured,

67

From an old beau,
os Kirty, a famous town.girl,

187

From Epping, with some account of a company of
Knowledge, the pursuit of it long, but not tedious,

strollers,
The only means to extend life beyond its natural dimen From a lady, complaining of a passage in the Funeral,
siuns,

From Hugh Goblin, president of the Ugly club,
The main sources of knowledge,

From Q. R. concerning laughter,
Ought to be communicative,

379
The Spectator's answer,

52
Rules for knowledge of one's self,

399

From R. B. to the Spectator, with a proposal relating to

the education of lovers,

From Anna Bella,
A LABOUR, bodily, of two kinds,

From a splenetic

gentleman,
e Lacedæmonians, their delicacies in their sense of glory,

From a reformed Starer, complaining of a Peeper, 53
A form of prayer used by them,

From King Latinus,
Ladies, not to cind party,

607

From a gentleman at Cambridge, containing an account
B Lady's library described,

37 of a new sect of philosophers called Loungers,
** Ladylove (Kartholomew), his petition to the Spectator, 334 From Celimene,
Laertes, his character in distinction to that of Irus,

114 From a fatber, complaining of the liberties taken in
Lætitia and Daphne, their story,

33
country dances,

66
d. Lampoons written by people that cannot spell,

From James to Betty,
Witry lampoons inflict wounds that are incurable, 23

To the Spectator, from the Ugly club at Cambridge, 78
The inhuman barbarity of the ordinary scribblers of lam. From a whimsical young lady,

79
poons,

23
* Lancashire Witches,' a comedy, censured,

From B. D. desiring a catalogue of books for the female
141
library,

79
Landscape, a pretty one,

From Rosalinda, with a desire to be admitted into the
Language, the English, much adulterated during the war,

Ugly club,
Language (licentious), the brutality of it,

Froni T. T. complaining of the Idols in coffee houses, 87
Languages (European), cold to the Oriental,

From Philo Britannicus, on the corruption of servants,
Lapinius, his great generosity,

2:8
From Sam. Hopewell,

89
Lapland ode translated,

From Leonora, reminding the Spectator of the cata-
Larvali, who so called among the ancients,

32
logue,

92
Lath (Squire), has a good estate, which he would part withal From B. D. concerning real sorrow,

95
for a pair of legs to his mind,

32 From Annabella, recommending the Bishop of Cambray's
Latimer, the martyr, his behaviour at a conference with the

Education of a Daughter,
Papists,

465 From Tom Trusty, a servant, containing an account of
Latin of great use in a country auditory,

his life and services,

96
Laughter (immoderate), a sign of pride,

From the master of the fan exercise,

102
A counterpoise to the Spleen,

From

against the equestrian order of ladies, 104
What sort of persons the most accomplished to raise it,

From Will Wimble to Sir Roger de Coverley, with a
A poesical figure of laughter out of Milton,

jack,
The distinguishing faculty in man,

To the Spectator from complaining of the new
Indecent many religious assembly,

petticoat,

127
Law-suits, i ha misery of them,

From a lawyer on the circuit, with an account of the pro-
Lawyers divided into the peaceable and the litigious,

gress of the fashions in the country,

129
Both sorts described,

21
From Will Honeycomb,

131
Leaf (green) swarmis with millions of animals,

From George Trusty, thanking the Spectator for the
Learning ought not to claim any merit to itself, but upon

great benefit he has received from his works,

134
the application of it,

From William Wiseacre, who desires his daughter may
The design of learning,

350
learn the exercise of the fan,

134
To he made advantageous eren to the meanest capaci. From a professcu liar,

136
ties,

353

From Ralph Valet, the faithtul servant of a perverse
Men of learning who take to business, best for it,

137
Highly nt cessary to a man of fortune,

From Patience Giddy, the next thing to a lady's wo-
Lee, tir poet, well turned for tragedy.

man,

137
Leo X a great lover of buffoons and coxeombs,

497

From Lydia Novell, complaining of her lover's con-
In what manner rpproved for it by a priest,

497
duct,

140
Leonora, her character,

37

From R. D. concerning the corrupt taste of the age, and
The descripcion of her country-seat,

37
the reasons of it,

140
Leontine and Eudoxus, their great friendship and advan From Betty Santer, about a wager,

140
tages,

From Parthenope, who is angry with the Spectator for
Leopold, the last emperor of that name, an expert joiner, 353

medd'ing with the ladies' petticoats,

140
Lesbia's letter to the Spectator, giving an account how she

From - upon drinking,

140
was deluded by her lover,

611 From Rachel Basto, concerning female gamesters, 140
Letter to the Sprctator, coinplaining of the masquerade,

From Parthenia,

140
From the opera lirn,

From - - containing a reflection on a comedy call.
From the under sexion of Covent.garden parish,

ed. The Lancashir- Witches,'

141
From the undertak r of the masquerade,

14

From Andromache, complaining of the false notion of
From one who had been to see the opera of Rinaldo, and

gallantry in love, with some letters from her husband
the puppet show,

to her,

149
From Charles Lille,

From
concerning wagerers,

145
From the president of the Ugly club,

From -, complaining of' impertinents in coffee-
From S. C. with a complaint against the Starers.

houses,

145
From Tho. Prone, who acted the wild boar that was

From -, complaining of an old bachelor,
killed by Mrs. Tofts,

From
From William Serene and Ralph Simple,

concerning the skirts of men's coats,

From on the reading the Common Prayer, 147
From an actor,

From the Spectator to a dancing out law,

148
From King Latinus,

From the same to a dumb visitant,

143

165
400
405

88

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190

Erora

dead to all other pleasures but that of being pront
From Anthony Gape, who had the misfortune or

his nose against a post, while he was staring 1
From Tom Trippet, on a Greek quotation in a forme
From S. T. who has a show in a box, of a man, 2 MORE
From Cleanthes, complaining of Mrs. Jane, an old wald,
From Cehia, incensed at a gentleman who had named the
From Hezekish Broadbrim, accusing the Specister for
From Teraminta, on the arrival of a Mademoiselle cat
From Betty Cross stitch, the owner of Mademoiselle,
From a shopkeeper, whose wife is too kamned er
From Florinda, who writes for the Spectator's advice in

the choice of a husband, after she is married,
From Clayton, &c. on the same subject as the forme
From Jenny Simper, complaining of the clerk of the

From Philobrune, of Cambridge, inquiring whichi

No.
Letter to the Spectator from Sylvia, a widow, desiring bis Letter from Athenais and Davyth ap Shenkyn on the man
advice in the choice of a husband,

149 subject,
The Spectator's answer,

3

From W. B. the projector of the pitch-pipe,
To the Spectator from Simon Honeycomb, giving an From

on education,
account of his modesty, impudence, and marriage, 154

From

on the awe which attends some speakers
From an Idol that keeps a coffee house,

155 in public assemblies,
From a beautiful milliner, complaining of her cus. From Philonous, on free thinkers,
tomers,

155 From

on marriage, and the husband's caudze
From
with a reproof to the Spectator,

158 to his wife,
From
concerning the ladies visitants,

158 From Tristissa, who is married to a fool,
From

complaining of the behaviour of persons From T. S. complaining of some people's behaviour in
in church,

158 divine service,
From a wor n's man,

158
From

with a letter translated from Ariste
From
with a description of a country wake, 161

netus,
From Leonora, who had just lost her lover,

163 From a citizen in praise of his benefactor,
From a young officer to his father,

165 From Rastic Sprighdy, a country gentleman, complain
To the Spectator from a castle-builder,

167

ing of a fashion introduced in the country by a court
From , concerning the tyranny of school-

newly arrived,
masters,

168

From Charles Easy, reflecting on the behaviour of a vert
From T. S. a school-boy at Richmond,

168 of beau at Philaster,
From
concerning impertinents,

168

From Asteria, on the absence of lovers,
From Isaac Hedgeditch, a poacher,

168 From Rebecca Ridinghood, complaining of an it be
To the Spectator: from

with a complaint

fellow.traveller,
against a Jezebel,

175
From

a poor weaver in Spitalfields,
From who had been nonplussed by a Butt

From Abraham Thrifty, guardian to two kar

4
From Jack Modish of Exeter about fashions,

175 nieces,
From Nathaniel Henroost, a henpeck'd husband,

176 From

on Raphael's cartoons,
From Celinda, about Jealousy,

178
From Constantia Field, on the ninth species of such

#
From Martha Housewife to her husband,

178

called Apes,
To the Spectator, from

with an account of a

From Timothy Doodie, a great lover of biol-cao'y
whistling match at the Bath,

179 buff,
From Philarithmus, displaying the vanity of Lewis XIV's From J. B. on the several ways of consolation made
conquests,

180 of by absent lovers,
From

who had married herself without her fa. From Trvilus, a declared enemy to the Greeks,
ther's consent,

181 From

-, on the nursing of children,
From Alice Threadneedle, against wenching,

182 From T. B. being a dissertation on the eye,
From
, in the round-house,

182 From Abraham

Spy, on a new invention of perspecting
From
concerning Nicholas Hart, the annual

glasses for the use of Starers,
sleeper,

184

From Mary Meartfree, describing the powerful effects of
Fro. Charles Yellow, against jilts,

187
From a gentleman to a lady, to whom he had formerly From Barbara Crabtree, to know if she may not beke
been a lover, and by whom he had been highly com-

use of a cudgel on her sot of a husband,
mended,

188 From a lawyer, whose wife is a great orator,
From a father to his son,

189 From Lydia to Harriet, a lady newly married,
To the Spectator from Rebecca Nettletop, a town-

Harriet's apswer,

To the Spectator, from a gentleman in love with a berets
Fron Eve Afterday, who desires to be kept by the

without fortune,
Spectator,

190
From a bawdy. house inhabitant, complaining of some

From Ralph Crochet, for a theatre of ease re be

ereeted,
of their visitors,

190 From Mr. Clayton, &c
From George Gosling, about a ticket in the lottery, 191 From Jack Atterday,
A letter of consolation to a young gentleman who has
lately lost his father,

191 50,000/.
To the Spectator, from a husband, complaining of a

From a lover, with an inclosed letter to his hamogreen
heedless wife,

mistress,
From ,complaining of a fantastical friend, 194

From a father, discoursing on the relative duties betwist
From J. B. with advice to the Spectator,

196 parents and their children,
From Biddy Loveless, who is enamoured with two From a mother to her undutiful son,
young gentlemen at once,

196

The son's answer,
From Statira to the Spectator, with one to Oroon.

To the Spectator from Richard Estcourt, with ea*
dates,

199
From Susan Civil, a servant to another lady, desiring

From James Easy, who had his nose abas-il in the
the Spectator's remarks upon voluntary counsel.

pit,
lors,

202 From A. B. on the mercenary riews of
From Thomas Smoky, servant to a passionate master,

202

they marry,
From a bastard, complaining of his condition as such, 203
From Belinda to the Sothades,

204
From J. D. to his coquette mistress,

204 beauty,
From a lady to a gentleman confessing her love, 204

From

about the new fashioned hoods,
From angry Phillis to her lover,

204 From one at Oxford in love with Patetia,
From a lady to her husband, an officer in Spain, 204
To the Spectator from Belinda, complaining of a female

Spectator,
seducer,

205 From C. D. on Sir Roger's return to town,
From a country clergyman, against an affected singing
of the Psalms in Church,

205 and a horse,
From Robin Goodiellow.containing the correction of an

erratum in Sir William Temple's rule for drinking 205 and a pickthank,
From Mary Meanwell about visiting,

208 From
From a shopkeeper, with thanks to the Spectator, 208 noble lord,
From a lover, with a hue-and-cry after his mistress's

From Frank Courtly, reproving the spectator for sex
heart,

208
From J. D. concerning the immortality of the soul,

freedoms he had taken,

210
From Melissa, who has a drone to her husband,
From Barnaby Brittle, whose wife is a filly,

words "Justy fellow' in her presence,

211
From Josiah Henpeck, who is married to a Grimalkin, 211

From Pucella. kept by an old bachelor,
From Martha Tempest, complaining of her witty hus.
band,

not keeping his word,

211
From Anthony Freeman, the henpecked,
From Tom Meggot, giving the Spectator an account of

212

pletely dressed from Paris,
the success of Mr. Freeman's lecture,
• From Kitty Termagant, giving an account of the Romp's

216

him,
Club,
From

217
complaining of his indelicate mistress,
From Susannah Frost, an old maid,

217
From A. B. a parson's wife,

217
From Henrietta to her ungracious lorer,

217

letter,

220
To the Spectator from

on false wit,
From T. D. concerning salutation,

rish, who

has overdecked the church with greens

220
From -
inquiring the reason why men of parts

From the clerk in his own justification,
are not the best managers,

From

222
From Asculapius, about the lover's leap,

most beautiful, a fair or brown complexinn,

tando
From

From

an old bachelor, who is gron

194

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From R

, with an inclosed letter from a band met

211

ton
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From T. B.

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No.
Letter from Melivina on male jilts,

288 Letter from three country virtuous virgins, who are ambie
From Peter Motteux, who from an author is turned

tjous of the characters of very good wives,

332
dealer,

288
From the author of the history of dancing,

334
From George Powell, who is to play the part of From a young man, complaining of an ill custom he has
Orestes, in a new tragedy, called 'The Distrest

observed among old men,

336
Mother,

290
From Rebecca the Distressed, complaining of a club of

1
From Sophia, to know if the gentleman she saw in the

female rakes,

330 -
Park with a short Cace was the Spectator,

290

From -, with some further thoughts on educa-
The Spectator's answer,

290
tion,

337, 353
To the Spectator from Jezebel, a woman poor and From Physibulus, occasioned by the Epilogue to “The
proud,

292
Distrest mother,

338
From Josiah Fribble, on pin-money,

295
From Philomeides, in answer to the foregoing letter,

342
From J. M. advising the Spectator to prefix no more From an officer, concerning Sylvana's conduct in the
Greek mottoes to his papers,

296
absence of her husband,

342
From Aurelia Careless, concerning the use of the win-

From Jack Freelove to his mistress, written in the person
dow in a beautiful lady:

296
of a monkey,

343
From Euphues, desiring the Spectator's advice, 296

To the Spectator, from Epicure Mammon, a great
From Susannah Lovebane, against lampooners,
296 trencherman,

344
From Charity Frost,

From - -, complaining of an extravagant custom
From John 'f'rot,

296
among some women of taking snuff,

344
From Chastity Loveworth, on the general notion men From Taw Waw Eben Zan Kaladar, Emperor of the
have of the other sex,

298
Mohocks, with a manifesto,

347
From Sir John Enville, married to a woman of qua. From Mary, against detraction,

348
lity,

299

From Hotspur, with the description of a devotee, 354
From Susannah Loveworth, on the behaviour of married From Sophrosunius, complaining of the impudent beha-
people before company,

300
viour of people in the streets,

354
From Philanthropos, on the terms of conversation with

From - in behalf of a genteel dress,

300
the fair sex,

300

From John Shallow, who had lately been at a concert of
From Miranda, on valetudinary friendship,

300
cat calls,

361
From D. G. thanking the Spectator for his criticism on From Tom Pottle, in commendation of Brooke and
Milton,

300
Hellier,

362
To Chloe, from her lover, giving her an account of his From Will Cymon, with an aceount of the improvements

301 wrought in him by love, and the charaeter of his mis-
From Clitander, a silent lover,

304
tress,

12
From Parthenissa, whose face is damaged by the small. From Philip Honeywood, upon travel,

304
pox,

306 From Robin Bridegroom, in Birchin-lane, complaining
From Corinna to Amilcar, on the same occasion, 306

of a set of drums that awakened him with their thun-
Amilcar's answer,
306 der the morning after he was married,

364
From -, on the education of children,
307 From Altamira, a prude,

361
From Mules Palfrey, with a project for the better regu.

From -, with the translation of a Lapland
lating of matches,

309
song,

366
From a tradesman married to a woman of quality, 208 From Constantia Comb-brush, complaining that her
From Reader Gentle, on a new paper called. The His.

mistress gives her cast off clothes to others,

366
torian,'

303 • From Paul Regnaud to his friend, on the death of
From Elizabeth Sweepstakes, complaining of John Trot,

Madame de Vellacerfe,

368
the dancer,

308 To the Spectator, from -, on whims and humour
From Biddy Dough-bake, who having been bid to love,

ists,

371
cannot unlove,

310 From Ralph Belfry, in commendation of Mr. Powel, mas.
From Dick Lovesick, in love with a lady, whose fortune

ter of the motion,

372
will not pay off his debts by 5001.

310 From Humphrey Transfer, on a moring club of parish
From a discarded lover, with a letter to him from his

clerks,

372
mistress, and his answer,

310
From H. R.complaining of the lawyer's club,

372
From Philanthropos, on a tale-bearer,

310 From Michael Gander, on the day watchmani and his
From Tim Watchwell, on fortune-stealers,
311 goose,

376
From J.O, on the expressions used by several of the

From Rachel Watchful, on dancing,

376
clergy in their prayers before sermon,

312 From Myrtilia, desiring the Spectator's advice in relation
From , containing further thoughts on educa.

to her lover,

380
tion,

313 Fron J. S. animadverting on some persons' behaviour at
From Bob Harmless, complaining of his mistress, 314

church,

380
From John Trot, desiring the Spectator's advice,

314 From T. S. on vanity, and the abundance of it in the fe-
From Toby Rentfree, with a complaint against Signior

380
Nicolini,

314 From Betty Lemon, who had been presented with a
From M.'w, on the education of young gentlewo.

guinea by a Jew,

380
men,

314 From the Sexton of St. Bride's, on a new charity school
From Samuel Slack, on idleness,

310
of fifty girls, erected in that parish,

380
From Clitander to Cleone,

316
From a gentleman in Denmark,

393
To the Spectator, with an account of the amours of From Queen Ann Boleyne to Henry the VIII.

397
Escalos, an old beau,

313 From Cynthio to Flavia, and their answers, on their
From Dorinda, complaining of the Spectator's par.

breaking off their amour,

398
tiality,

From a bankrupt to his friend,

456
From Will Sprightly, a man of mode, concerning fa-

'I he answer,

450
shions.
319 From Lazarus Hopeful to Busil Plenty,

472
From

complaining of a female court, called "To the Spectator; from Peter de Quir, of St. John's
The Inquisition on Maids and Bachelors.

320
college in Cambridge,

396
"The power and management of this inquisition,

320 From a penitent jilt,
From N. B. a member of the Lazy club,

320 Froin a lady inportuned by her mother to be unfaithful
To the Spectator, from Octavia, married to an ungrate-

to her husband,

402
ful husbanil,

322 From a married man, who out of jealousy obstructed the
From Clarinda, with her journal,
323 marriage of a lady to whom he was guardian,

402
From Philanthropos, with an account of the Mohock From a lady, whose lover would have abused her passion
club,
321 for bim,

402
From a countryman, to her he very much respects, Mrs. From a young uncle, on the disobedience of his elder
Margaret Clark,
324 nephew's and nieces,

402
From R. T. to the Spectator, upon a passage in Mil. About a city and a country life,
ton,

325 With a translation of a Lapland ode,
From a country gentleman, lying under the misfor-

On the passions,
tune of having a very fine park, and an only Concerning Gloriana,
daughter,

326 Of good-humour,
From Mrs. Mary Comfit, at Mile-end Green,

320 Of the country infirmary,
From T. B. complaining of his wife's expensive long-

of common beggars,
ings during her pregnancy,

326 Of charity schools,
From a married gentleman, who is in a fair way of being

The freedoms of married men and women,
undone by his virtuous lovely wife,
328 From Richard and Sabina Renttree,

431
From S. P. recommending the patronage of young mo About prejudice and emulation,

432
dest men to such as are able to countenance and intro.

Naked shoulders,

437
duce them into the world,

437
From James Discipulus, complaining of the nearness of

A country sociely and infirmary,
From Camilla,

443
his father as a great discouragement to him in the

From an exchange man,

413
course of his studies,

330 About buttoonery,
From Jack Lightfoot, containing at account of his From Ephraim Weed,

332 From a projector for news,

male sex,

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From Shalum the Chinese to the Princess Hilpe,
From Jeremy Lovemore, with an account of his
From a pedant, in his pedantic way, on the same
From the love-casuist, about the widow's tenure, and

From one who recommended himself for 209

Lewis of France pared with the Czar of Mageurs

No.
Letter about education,

455 Letter from Mr. Pope, on the verses spoken by the Lapura
From one who had married a scold,

455 Adrian upon his death-bed,
From Pill Garlick,

From Dustererastus, whose parents will not bet
About the use and abuse of similes,

455

choose a wife for bimself,
Salutations at churches,

460 From Penance Cruel, complaining of the behaviour di
With a translation of the 114th Psalm,

461

persons who travelled with her in a stage coach outd
About the advance on the paper for the stamps, 461

Esses to London,
About King Charles che Second's gaieties,

462

From Sharlot Wealthy, setting forth the hud er
About dancing

466 such women as are beauties and fortunes,
About sight,

472 From Abraham Dapperuit, with the Spectator's assue.
About panegyrical satires on ourselves,

473 From Jeremy Confit, a grocer, who is in hopes of your
From Timothy Stanza,

473

ing rich by losing his customers,
From Bob Short,

From Lucinda Parley, a coffee house idol,
To the Spectator: from J. R. complaining of his From C. B. recommending knotting as a properame>
neighbours, and the turn of their conversation in the

ment to the beaux,
country,

474 From a shoeing horn,
From Dulcibella Thankley, who wants a direction to Mr. From Relicta Lovely, a widow,
Campbell, the dumb fortune teller,

474

From Eustace, in love with a lady of eighteen, ele
From D. B. desiring the Spectator's advice in a weighty

parents think her too young to mariy by three year
affair,

476
From , containing a description of his garden, 477

complaining of a young divine,
From Á. B. with a dissertation on fashions, and a pro-

murdered Archbishop Tillotson's strmon eposed

speaking,
posal for a building for the use of them,

478

From -
From Monsieur Chezluy to Pharamond,

with a short critique on Spenser,

From Philo-Spec, who apprehends a dissolution /
To the Spectator, from a clerk 10 a lawyer,

Spectator's club, and the ill consequences of it,
From -, being a lady married to a cot-quean, 482

From Captain Sentry, lately come to the possied
From
with a dissertation on modesty,

484 Sir Roger de Coverley's estate,
From containing reflections on the powerful
effects of trifles and trifling persons,

From the Emperor of China to the Pope,

485
From a handsome black man, two pair of stairs in the

From W. C. to the Spectator, in commendatisa di
Paper-buildings in the Temple, who rivals a hand-

generous benefactor,
some fair man up one pair of stairs in the same

From Charles Easy, setting forth the sovereigu see
buildings,

the Spectators in several remarkable instaneth

,

485 From
From Robin Shorter, with a postscript,

, on poetical justice,
485

From Sir Andrew Freeport, who is retiring fronte
From

with an account of the unmarried hen-
pecked, and a vindication of the married,

ness,
486

From Philonicus, a litigious gentleman, complaining er
From

with an epigram on the Spectator by
Mr. Tate,

some unpolite law terms,

488 From T. F. G. S. J. T. E. T. in commendation of
From

with some reflections on the ocean, con.
sid: red both in a calm and a storm, and a divine ode

Spectator,
on that occasion,

From the Bantam ambassador, to his master, absis de
From Matilda Mobair, at Tunbridge, complaining of the

English,

From he Dumb conjurer to the Spectator,
disregard she meets with, on account of her strict vir-
tue, from the men, who take more notice of the romps

From the Chit-chat club,
and coquettes than the rigid,

From Oxford, about his recovering his speech,

492
From T. B. complaining of the behaviour of some fathers

From Frank Townly,
towards their eldest sons,

About the Widow's club,

496
From Rachel Shoestring, Sarah Trice, an humble ser

From Blank, about his family,
vant unknown, and Alice Bluegarter, in answer to

About an angry husband,
that of Matilda Mohair, who is with child, and has

From Will Warley, about military education,
crooked legs,

From an half pay officer, about a widow,

496
From Moses Greenbag, the lawyer, giving an account

From Peter Push, on the same subject,
of some new brothers of the whip, who have chambers

Against quacks,
in the Temple,

From the president of the Widow's club,
From Will Honeycomb, with his dream, intended for a

From a man taken to be mad for reading of poetry
Spectator,

aloud,

499
From Philogamus, in commendation of the married

A second letter about the ubiquity of the Godiesel

,

Several answered at once,
state,

500

From Constantio Spec,
From Ralph Wonder, complaining of the behaviour of
an unknown lady at the parish church near the

From Amanda Lovelength,
Bridge,

50g
From l'itus Trophonius, an interpreter of dreams,

the Flood,

505
From

From Hilpa to Shalum,
complaining of the oppression and in-
justice observed in the rules of all clubs and meet-

From John Shadow at Oxford, about reflecting store

on past day's actions,
ings,

508
From Hezekiah Tbrift, containing a discourse on

About a vision of hearts,

About planting,
trade,

509
From Will Honeycomb, occasioned by two stories he

From John Shadow, about dreams,
had met with relating to a sale of women in Persia

of inconsistent metaphors,
and China,

511
From the Spectator's clergyman, being a Thought on

About making love,

From Fanny Fickle,
sickness,

513

From an aunt, about her niece's idleness,
From
-, with a vision of Parnassus,

514

About the vanity of some clergymen wearing scaria
From -, with two inclosed, one from a celebrated

From Tom Nimble, about antipathies,
town-coquette to her friend newly married in the

From Cleora, against the ladies' work,
country,
and her friend's answer,

515

From Lesbia, a deluded lady,
From Ed. Biscuit, Sir Roger de Coierley's butler, with About genealogy,
an account of his master's death,

517

From Will Hopeless, about ambition,
From - condoling with him on Sir Roger's death,
with some remarkable epitaphs,

From the Temple, about beggar's eloquences
From Tom Tweer on Physiognomy, &c.

From Monimia, to recover a lost love,

518
From F. G. a widower, with some thoughts on a man's

From a country wit, in the burlesque way,
behariour in that condition,

520

ject,
-, a great enemy to public report,

521 About the styles of letters,
From T. W. a man of prudence, to his mistress,

Answers to several,
To the Spectator, from B. T. a sincere lorer, to the About flattery,
same,

592
From -, dated from Glasgow in Scotland, with

black ram,
a vision,

524

From the same, about love queries,
From Pliny to his wife's aunt Hispulla,

525
From Moses Greenbag to the Spectator, with a further

monger,
account of some gentlemen-brothers of the whip, 526 About the force of novelty,
From Philagnotes, giving an account of the ill etfects of

About a crossed lover,
a visit he paid to a female married relation,

527 About eternity to come,
From
who had made his mistress a present of a

About church music,
fan, with a copy of verses on that occasion,

527
From Rachel Welladay, a virgin of twenty-three, with

Letter

dropper of antiquity, who,
a heavy complaint against the men,

528 Levees of great men animadverted upon,
From Will Honeycomb, lately married to a coun.
try girl, who has no portion, but a great deal of
virtue,

530 Libels, a severe law against them,

The

498

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A fable

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MACBETH
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Their
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Vanilios, his
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518

Froin

522

About the Rattling club's getting into charch,

Levity of women, the effects of it,

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