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No.

No.
istotle, his definition of an entire act of epic poetry, 267 Beauties, whether male or female, very untractable,

87
His sense of the greatness of the action in a poem; his And fantastical,

141
method of examining an epic poem,

273 Impertinent and disagreeable,
An observation of that critic's,

273
The efficacy of beauty,

144
One of the best logicians in the world,

291 Beauty in a virtuous woman makes her more virtuous, 300
· His division of a poem,

297 Heightened by motion,
Another of his observations,
297 Of objects, what understood by it,

412
His observation on the fable of an epic poem,

315 Nothing makes its way nore directly to the soul, 412
istus and Aspasia, a happy couple,

128 Every species of sensible crealures has different notions
m (the) called by Tully the orator's weapon,

541
of it,

412
sinoe, the first musical opera on the English stage,

18 A second kind of it,
t of Criticism, the Spectator's account of that poem,
253 The force of it,

510
Works of art defective to entertain the imagination, 414 Beggars, Sir Andrew Freeport's opinion of them,

232
Receive great advantage from their likeness to those of The grievance of them,

430
nature,

414 Beigs, the scale of beings considered by the Spectator, 519
The design of it,
541 Bell (Mr.) hisingenious device,

28
** De tillery, the invention and first use of it, to whom ascribed Bell-savage, its etymology,

28
by Milton,
333 Belvidera, a critique on a song upon her,

470
de les tist, wherein he has the advantage of an author,
106 Belus (Jupiter), iemple of,

415
aph, St. (the Bishop of), his preface to his Sermons, 384 Beneficence, the pleasure ot it,

538
sociation of honest men proposed by the Spectator,
126 A discourse on it,

001
surance, what,
373 Benevolence treated of,

001
da dheis, an enemy to cheerfulness of mind,

381 Bicknell (Mrs. for what commended by the Spectator, 370
Two unanswerable arguments against it,

389 Bill proposed by a country gentleman to be bought into the
In what manner atheists ought to be treated,
389 House for the better preserving of the female game,

326
y broer heists, great zealots,
185 Bills of mortality, the use of them,

289
and bigots,

185 Birds, a cage full for the opera,
Their opinions downright nonsense,
185 How affected by colours,

412
o tiens, disinterested and prudent conduct in his friend. Bion, his saying of a greedy search after happiness,

574
ships,

385 Biters, their business,
varice, the original of it,

55 Biting, a kind of mongrel wit described and exploded by the
Operates with luxury,

Spectator,

504
At war with lustry,

55 Biton and Clitobus, their story related, and applied by the
Its officers and adherents,
55 Spectator,

483
Cones to an agreement with luxury,

55 Blackmore (Sir Richard), his olvservation,
sau audience, the gross of an audience of whom composed, 502 Blank, his letter to the Spectator about his family,

503
The vijous taste of our English andiences,
502 Bank verse proper for tragedy,

39
udiences. at present void of cominon sense,
13, 290 Blanks of society, who,

10
ugust and July (months of lescribed,
425 Blast (Lady), her character,

457
ugustus, his request to his fiiends at his death,
317 Bluemantle (Lady), an account of her,

427
His reproof to the Roman bachelors,
528 Board wages, the ill ettrets of it,

83
His saying of mourning for the dead,
575 Boxcalini, his animadversions upon critics,

291
urelia, her character,

15 His fable of a grasshopper applied to the Spectator, 355
uthor, the necessity of his readers being acquainted with his Bodily exercises of ancient encouragement,

161
size, complexion, and temper, in order to read his Body (human), the work of a transcendently wise and power-
works with pleasure.

1
ful Being:

543
His opinion of his own performances,
4 Bohours (Monsieur), a great critic among the French,

02
The expedient made use of by those who write for the Boileau censured, and for what

209
stage,

51 Bonosus, the shrunken Briton, a saying of him after he had
In what manner one anthor is a mole to another, 121 hanged himself,
Wherein an author has the advantage of an artist, 166 Books, reduced to their quintessence,

124
The c.re an author ought to take of what he writes,
166 The legacies of great geniuses,

165
A story of an atheistical author,
166 Boots Rimez, what,

00
uthors, for what most to be admired,
355 Breeding, tine breeding distinguished from gond.

66
Their precedency settled according to the bulk of their Bribery, the most prevailing way of making one's court, 394
works,

529 British ladies distinguished from the Picts,
Brunetta and Phillis, their adventures,

80
BABEL (Tower of).
415 Biuvere (Monsieur), his character of an absent man,

77
Bacon (Sir Francis), his comparison of a book well written, 19 Buck (Timothy), his answer to James Miller's challenge, 436
His observation upon envy,
19 Buffoonery censuredl,

443
Preseribes his reader a poem or prospect, as conducive to Bullock and Norris, differently habited, prove great helps to
heal h,

a silly play,
Whar he says of the pleasure of taste,

447 Burlesque authors the delight of ordinary readers, 616, 625
His extraordinary learning and parts,
554 Burlesque lumour,

616
Sacon.ftch at Whichenovre, in Scaffordshire, who are en Burnet (Ur.), some passages in his Theory of the Earth con-
titled to it,

607
sidered,

143, 116
Several demands for it,
603 Business (men of), their error in similitudes,

421
Bags of money, a sudden transformation of them into sticks Of learning fittest for it.
3 Bussy d'Amboise, a story of lim,

467
Baniboo (Benjamin), the philosophical use he resolves to Butt: the adventure of a butt on the water,

175
make of a shrew of a wife,

482 Butas described,
Bankruptcy, the misery of it,
428. 456 The qualification of a butt,

47
Bantum, ainbassador of, his letter to his master about the
English,

557 CACOETHES, or itch of writing, an epidemical distemper, 532
Baptist Lülly 'his prudent management,
29 Calia, her character.

401
Bareface, his success with the ladies, and the reason for it, 156 Cæsar (Julius) his behaviour to Catullus, who had put him
Bar oratory in Englanil. *eflections on it,

407

into a lampoon,
Basilius Valentinis, and his son, their story,

426
His reproof to an ill reader,

117
Bawdry, never writ but where there is dearth of'invention, 51 A frequent saying of his,

256
Bawdy horses frequent by wise men, not out of wanton-

His Conmentaries, the new edition of it an honour to the
ness but stratagem,

190
English press,

367
Easter (Mr.), his last words,
445 His activity and perseverance,

374
More last words,

Lost his life by neglecting a Roman angur's caution, 395
What a blessing he had,

598 Calamilies, the merit of suffering patiently under then, 312
ayle (Mr.), what he says of libels,
451 Not to be distinguished from blessings,

483
earls in former ages a type of wisdom,
331 Whimsical calamities,

558
Instances of the homage heretofore paid to beards, 331 Caligula, his wish,

16
At what time the beard flourished most in this na Calisthenes, his character,

422
• tion,
331 Calamny, the ill effects of it,

451
The ill consequence of introducing it amongst us at The great offence of calumny,

594
present,

331
Rules against it by the fathers of La Trappe,

592
A description of Hydibrag's beard,

331 Cambray (he Bishop of), his education of a daughter recom.
ar garden, the Spectator's method for the improvement

mended,

95
of it,
141 Camilla, a true woman in one particular,

15
A combat there,

436

Her letter to the Spectator from Venice,
The cheats of it,

449 How applauded there,
aver, the haberdasher, a great politician,
49 Camillus, his deportment to his son,

203
au's head, the dissection of one,

275 Campbell (Mr.), the dumb fortune-teller, an extraordinary
auties, when plagiaries,

person,

474
The true secret how to improve beauty,
33 Candour, the consequence and benefit of it,

390
Teen the most charming when heightened by virtue, 32 Camdia, an antiquated beauty describedi,

312

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445

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He gives the Spectator an account of his amours, and the
The manner of his reception at the assizes, where
Ilis return to town, and conversation with the Spero

His reflections upon visiting the tombs in Westminster

Cant, from whence to be derived,

147 Club-law, a convincing argument,
Capacities of children, not duly regarded in their educa. Clubs, nocturnal assemblies so called,
tion,

307 Several names of clabs, and their originals,
Caprice uften acts in the place of reason,

191 Rules prescribed to be observed in the Tropicas;
Carbuncle (Dr.), his dye, what,

club,
Care : what ought to be a man's chief care,

122 An account of the Ugly club,
Carrieades, the philosopher, his definition of beauty, 144 The Sighing club,
Cartesian, how he would account for the ideas formed The Fringeglove club,
by the fancy, from a single circumstance of the me-

The amorous club,
mory,

417 The Hebdomadal club: some account of the memband
Cases in love answered,

614 that elub,
Casimir Liszynski, an atheist in Poland, the manner of his Some accountof the Everlasting club,
punishment,

310
The club

Ugly faces,
Cassius, the proof he gave of his temper in bis childhood, 157 The difficulties met with in erecting that club,
Castilian, the story of a Castilian husband and his wilt, 198 The institution and use of clubs,
Castle builders, who, and their follies exposed,

167 Coach (stage), ils company,
Cat, a great contributor to harmony,

361 Coffee-house disputes,
Cat call, a dissertation upon that instrument,

361 Coffee-house debates seldom regular or methodical

,
Catiline, Tully's character of him,

386 Coffee house liars, two sorts of them,
Cato, the respect paid him at the Roman theatre,

446 Colours, the eye takes most delight in them,
The grounds for his belief of the inmortality of the

Why the poets borrow most epithets from theid,
soul,

537

Only ideas in the mind,
An instance f his probity,

557 Speak all languages,
Cave of Trophonius, several people put into it to be Comedies, English, vicious,
mended,

599 Comfort, what, and where found,
Celibacy, the great esil of the nation,

528 An attendant on patience,
Censor, of small wares, an ofticer to be appointed,

16 Commendation generally followed by detraction
of marriages,

308

Commerce, the extent and advantage of it,
Censure, a tax, by whom paid to the public, and for what,

101 Commercial friendship preferable to generosity,
Centre and applause should not mislead us,

610 Conimon-jirayer, some considerations on the reading of a
Chamunt's saying of Moniınia's misfortunts,

395 The excellency of it,
Chancity court, why erected,

564 Cominonwealth of Amazons,
Chaplzula the character of Sir Roger dle Coverley's,

106 Company, temper chietly to be considered in the chose
Chamv, ih great want of it among Christians,

utit,
Charity-shools, great instances of a public spirit,

294 Comparisons in Homer and Milton defended by Maka
Should be encouraged,

Boileau against Monsieur Perrault,
Charles I. a famous picture of that prince,

58 Compassion, the exercise of it would tend to lessen the cho
Charte. Il. hi, gaittius,

402

niities of life,
Charles the Great, bis behaviour to his secretary, who had Civilizes human nature,
debauched his daughter,

181 How to touch it,
Charios, none can supply she place of virtue,

395 Complaisance, what kind of it peculiar (o courts,
Chastity, the great point of honour in women,

99 Compliments in ordinary discourse censured,
How chastity was prized by the heathens,

579 Exchange of compliments,
Chastity of renown, whai,

480 Concave and convex figures in architecture have the gud
Chestiiness of temper, how to be obtained and pre-

est air, and why,
screed,

143 Condé (Prince of), bis face like that of an eagle,
Iherein preferable to mirth,

381 Confidence, the danger of it to the ladies,
When worse than tolly or madness,

381 Conquests, the vanity of them,
The many advantages of a cheerful temper,

381 Connecte (Thomas), a monk in the 14th century, a zake
Cherubiins, what the rabbinis say they are,

600

preacher against the women's commodes on the
Chery Chase, the Spectator's examen of it,

70, 74 days,
Children, wrong measures taken in the education of the

Consciousness, when called affectation,
British children,
The unnaturalness of mothers in making them suck a

157 Constancy in sufferings, ibe excellency of it,

Contemplation, the way to the mountain of the muses,
stranger's milk,

246 Content, how described by a Rosicrucian,
The duty of children to their parents,

436
Ift education of children fala).
A multiude of them one of the blessings of the married

431 Contentment, the utmost good we can hope for in this lite,
Conversation most straightened in numerous assembits

.
state,

500 Usually stuffed with too many compliments,
Children in the Wood, a ballad, wherein to le commended 85
Chimest, the pumbrent among them for parricide,

What properly to be understood by the word met
189

tion,
Why the Chinese laugh at our gardens,

414
Chischar club's letter to the Speciator,

An improvement of taste in letters,

560 Coquette's heart dissected,
Chlt, ihe niliot,
Chremylus, luis charseter out of Aristophanes,

466 Coquettes, the present numerous race to what owing,

464
Chris sau religion, the clear proof of its articles, and excel.

Great coveys of them about this town,
luncy of its doctrines,

Cordeliers, their story of St. Francis, their founder,

186, 213 Cornaro (Lewis), a remarkable instance of the benefit of
Christiamty, the only system that can proluce content 574

perance,
How much above philosophy,
Chocolate, a great heater of the blood in women,

634 Cot-queans described by a lady who has obe for ber hans

band,
Chronogran. a piece of false wit,
Church musicians reproved for not keeping to the text as well

60 Cotillus, his great equanimity,
as the preachers,

Coverley (Sir Roger de), a member of the Spectator's elit
338

his character,
Church work, slow works, according to Sir Roger de Co-
verly,

His opinion of men of fine parts,

Is something of a humorisi,
Church.yard, the country 'Change on Sunday,

His choice of a chaplain,
Cicero, a punster,
The entertainment found in bis philosophical writings, 61

His management of his family,
His gainius,

His actount of his ancestors,
The oracle's ad ice in him,

Is forced to have every room in his house exoretised
Whai be says of scandal,

his chaplain,
Ot the Ionian gladiators,

A greal benefactor to his church in Woreestershire,

436
Ilis extraordinary superstition,

In which he suffers no one to sleep hut himself

,
And desire of glory,

554 character of his widow,
Clarendon (Fars of his character of a person of a trouble.
sume curiosity,

The trophies ot his several exploits in the country,

439
A reflection of that historian,

A great Fos-hunter,

485
Clarinda, an idul, in what manner worshipped,

An instance of his good-nature,

73
Clavius, proving incapable of any other studies, became a ce-

His aversion to confidants,
k-brated mathemaucian,

307
Cleanliness, the praise of it,

whispers the judges in the ear,

His adventure when a schoolboy,
Cleanthe, her story',

A man for the landed interest.
Clanthus, his character,

404 His adventure with some gipsies,
Cleopatra. a description of her sailing down the Cydnas,
Cergy, a three-fold division of thein,

Rarely sports near his own seat,
Clergymen one of the Spectator's club,

A dispute between him and Sir Andrew Freeport,
Gersymer, the vanity of some in wearing scarves,

609

tor in Gray's Inn Walks,
Club: the She kop elub,

217
Melhor's observed by that club,

His intended generosity to his widow,
The Molotkrlub,

Abbey,
The design of weir institution,

A great friend to beards,

Corombs,
Cab, of

Ugly
Crazs, a
Creation,

The e

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Credit, ab

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418
416
416

False courage,

99

tion,

415

483

21
439

No.

No.
overley (Sir Roger de.) goes with the Spectator and Cap Death: the benefit of death,

349
tain Sentry to a play called . The Disuest Mother,' 335 Debauchee, his pleasure is that of a destroyer,

199
His behaviour, and remarks at it,
335 Debt, the ill state of such as run in debt,

82
His uneasiness on the widow's account,
359 Derency nearly related to virtue,

104, 292
His observations on his passage with the Spectator to Decency of behaviour generally transgressed,

292
Spring Gardens,
383 Dedications, the absurdity of them in general,

188
In what manner affronted on that occasion,
383 Defamation, the sign of an ill heart,

427
His adventure with Sukey,

410
Papers of that kind a scandal to the government,

451
His good humour,
424 To be punished by goud ministers,

451
An account of his death brought to the Spectator's Definitions, the use of them recommended by Mr. Locke,

373
club,
517 Deformity no cause of shame,

17
His legacies,

517 Delicacy; the difference between a true and a false deli.
Fountry, the charms of it,

118
cacy,

286
Sountry gentleman and his wife, neighbours to Sir Roger, The standard of it,

286
their different tempers described,
128 Delight and surprise, properties essential to wit,

62
'ountry Sunday, the use of it,
112 Deluge, Mr. W-n's notion of it reproved,

396
fountry wake described,
161 Demurrers, what sort of women so to be called.

80
tountry life, why the poets in love with it,
414 Denying, sometimes a virtue,

458
What Horace and Virgil say of a country life, 414 Dependants, objects of compassion,

282
Rules for it,

424 Deporumeni (religious) why so little appearances of it in
- మన A scheme of it,

England,
'ountry gentlemen, advice to them about spending their Descriptions come short of statuary and painting,
time,

583 Please sometimes more than the sight of things,
Memoirs of the life of one,

622

The same not alike relished by all,
al Country Wake,' a farce commended by the Spectator,

502
What pleases in them,

418
t ourage recommends a man to the female sex more than any What is great, surprising, and beautiful, more accept-
other quality,

99 able to the imagination than what is little, common, or
One of the chief topics in books of chivalry,

deformed,

418
29 Desire, when corrected,

400
Mechanic courage, what,
152 Detraction, the generality of it in conversation,

348
Other good qualities wanted to set off courage,
422 Devotee, the description of one,

354
Courage and magnanimity inseparable,
350 Devotion, the great advantage of it,

93
* Fourt interest, the several ways of making it,
394 The most natural relief in our afflictions,

163
Court and city, their peculiar ways of life and conversa. A man is distinguished from brutts more by devotion

403
than reason

201
in Courtier's habit, on what occasions bieroglyphical,
64 The errors into which it often leads us,

201
Courtship, the pleasantest part of a man's life,

261 The notions the most refined among the heathens had
Cowards naturally impudent,

231
of it,

207
Cowley (Mr.), abounds in mixed wit,
62 Socrates's model of devotions,

207
His magnanimity,

111 The noblest buildings owing to devotion,
His opinion of Perseus the Latin satirist,

339 Diagoras, the atheist, his behaviour to the Athenians in a
His description of heaven,

590

storm,
His story of Aglais,
610 Diana's cruel sacrifices condemned by an ancient poet,

453
His ambition,
613 Dick Crastin challenges Tum Tulip,

91
Coxcombs, generally the women's favourites,

128 Dignitaries of the law, who,
Crab, of King's college, Cambridge, chaplain to the club of Dionysius's ear, what it was,
Ugly Faces,
78 Dionysius, a club tyrant,

508
Crazy, a man thought so by reading Milton aloud, 577 Disappointments in love, the most difficult to be conquered
Creation,' a poein, commended by the Spectator,
339 of any other,

163
The contemplations on creation a perpetual feast of de Discontent, to what often owing,

214
light to the mind of a good man,
393 Discourse in conversation not to be engrossed by one man,

428
Credit, & beautiful virgin, her situation and equipage, 3 Discretion, an under agent of Providence,
A great valetudinarian,

Distinguished froni conning,

225
Credit undone with a whisper,
320 Absolutely necessary in a good husband,

607
Credulity in women infamous,
190 Dissenters, their canting way of reading,

147
Cries of London require some regulation,

251 Dissimulation, the perpetual inconvenience of it,
Criminal love, some account of the state of it,
274 Distempers, difficuli to change them for the better,

599
Critic, the qualities requisite to a good one,

291 Distinction, the desire of it implanted in our natures, and
Critics (French), friends to one another,

409
Moilern ones, some errors of theirs about plays, 592 Distracted persons, the sight of them the most mortifying
Cross (Miss, wanted near half a ton of being as handsome

thing in nature,

421
as Madam Van Brisker, a great beauty in the Low • Distrest Mother,' a new tragedy, recommended by the Spec.
Countries,

32
tator,

200
Cuckoldom abused on the stage,

446 Divine nature, our narrow conceptions of it,
Cunning, the accomplishment of whom,

Its omnipresence and omniscience,
Curiosity, one of the strongest and most lasting of our ap-

Divorce. what esteemed to be a just pretension to one,
petites,
237 Doctor in Moorfields, his contrirance,

193
An instance of absurd curiosity,

439 Dogget, the comedian, how cuckolded on the stage,
Custom, a second nature,
437 For what comnende: by the Spletator,

502
The effect of it,
437 Domestic lite, reflections concerning it,

455
How to make a good use of it,
437 Donne (Dr.) his description of his mistress,

41
Cannot make every thing pleasing,

453 Dorigny (Monsieur, bis piece of the Transfiguration excel-
Cynceas, Pyrrhus's chief minister, his handsome reproof to

cellent in its kind,

226
that prince,
180 Doris, Mr. Congreve's character of,

422
Cynthio and Flavia break off their amour very whimsi. Drama, its first original a religious worship,

405
sically,
308 Dream of the Seasons,

425
yrus, how he tried a young lord's virtue,
504 of golden scales,

463

Dreams, in what manner considered by the Spectator, 487
DACINTHUS, his character,

462

The folly of laying any stress upon, or drawing conse-
Dainty. (Mrs. Mary), her memorial from the country in.

quences from our dreams,

505
firmary,

429 The multitude of creanis sent to the Spectator,
Damon and Strephon, their amonr with Gloriana,

423
A discourse on dreams,

593, 597
Dancing a discourse on it defended,
67 Several extravagant ones,

597
A necessary accomplishment,
334 or Trophonius's cave,

599
The disadvantages it lieth under, to what owing, 334 Dress, the adi antage of being well dressed,

360
Useful on the stage,

The ladies extravagance in it,

435
On the stag faulty,
466 An ill intention in their singularity,

435
The advantages of it,

466 The Engli-h character to be modest in it,
angers past, why the reflection of them pleases,

418 Drink, the titects it has on modesty,
apierwit (Tom), bis opinion of matrimony,
482 Drinking, a rule prescribed for it,

195
Recommended by Will Honeycomb to succeed him in Drums, customary, but very improper instruments in a mar-
the Spectator's club,

530
riage concert,

364
ay, the several times of it in several parts of the town, 454 Drunkard, a character of one,

569
zath, the time and manner of our death not known to

Is a monster,

669
US,
7 Drunkenness, the ill effects of it,

509
The contemplation of it affords a delight mixed with What Seneca and Publius Synes said of it.

569
terror und sorrow,
133 Dry (Will), a man of a clear bead, bu* few words,

476
Intended for our relief
133 Dryden (Mr.), his definition of wit censurid,

62
Deaths of eminent persons the most improving passages His happy turn for prologue or epiloglie,

341
ih history,

153, 289 His translation of lapis's cure of Æneas out of Virgil, 572

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225

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15 Faustina, the Enpress, her notions of a pretty good

470 Fellow of a college, a wise saying of one about

No.
Dryden (Mr.), bis translation of Æneas's ships being turned Estcourt, the comedian, bis extraordinary talents,
to goddesses,

589 Eternity, a prospect of it,
His cock's speech of Dame Partlet,

621 An essay upon eternity,
Duelling, a discourse against it,

Part is to come,
Pharamond's edict against it,

97 Speech in Calo on eternity, translated into Latin,
Dull tellows, who,

43 Ether (fields of), the pleasure of surveying them,
Their inquiries are not for information but exercise, 43 Etherege (Sir George), author of a comedy called "Sde
Naturally ruro their beads to politics or poetry,

43 wonld if she could,' reproved,
Duration, the idea of it huw obtained, according to Mr. Ever-greens of the fair sex,
Locke,

.94 Evremond (St.), his endeavours to palliate the Roman sepe
Different beings may entertain different potions of the

stitions,
same parts of duration,

94 The singularity of his remarks,
Dutch more polite than the English in their buildings, and Egbulus, his character,
monuments of their dead,

26 Eucrate, the favourite of Pharamond,
Their saying of a man that buppens to break,

174 His conference with Pharamund,
Dyer, the news-writer, an Aristotle in politics,

43/ Eucratia, her character,

Eudosia, her behaviour,
EARTH, why covered with green rather than any other

Her character,
colorir,

387 Eudoxus and Leontine, their friendship and education of the
Eastcourt (Dick). his character,

468

children,
Eating, drinking, and sleeping, with the generality of peo-

Eugene (Prince), the Spectator's account of him,
ple, the thice important articles of life,

317 In what manner to be compared with Alexander x
Edgar (King), an amour of his,

Cæsar,
Editors of the ela sies, their faults.
Education: an ill method observed in the educating our

470 Eugenius, appropriates a tenth part of bis income to chario

ble uses,
youth,

157 Euphrates river contained in one basin,
The first thing to be taken care of in education,

224 Exchange (Royal) described,
Whether the education at a public school, or under a

Exercise, the great benefit and necessity of bodily eseroa,
private tutor, be to be preferred,

313 The most effectual pbysic,
The advantage of public education,

313 Expenses, oftener proportioned to our expectations than pa
A regulation of education proposed,

337 sessions,
Eriors in the education of chuldren,

431 Eyes, a dissertation on them,
A letter on that subject,

455

The prevailing influence of the eye instanced in kichi
Gardening applied to education,

particulars,
Eginhart, secretary to Charles the Great, his adventure and
quarriage with that emperor's daughter,

181 FABLE of the lion and the man,
Egotism, the vanity of it condemned,

of the children and frogs,
A young fellow, very guilty of it,

562 of Jupiter and the countryman,
Egyptians tormented with the plague of darkness,

615
1 Elizabeth (Green), her medal on the defeat of the Spanish

The antiquity of fables,

Fable of Pleasure and Pain,
Arada,

293 of a drop of water,
Eloqnence of' beggars,

613
Embellish --Ps, whal persons so called,

The great usefulness and antiquity of fables,

521 Face, a good one a letter of recommendation,
Emilia, an excellent woman, her character,

419 Faces, every man should be pleased with his own,
Eminent men, the tax paid by them to the public,

302 Fadlallah, his story out of the Persian tales.
Einperor of the Mohocks, his arms, and how borne,

101 Fairs for buying and selling women customary among
Employments, who ver excels in any worthy of praise,

Persians,
Emulation, the uic of it,

432 Fairy writing,
Enemies, the benefits that may be received from them,

432 The pleasures of imagination that arise from it,

399
English, genera:ly inclined to my lancholy,

More difficult than any other, and why,

387
Naturally modest,

The English are the best poets of this sort,
Thoughi proud by for igners,

407, 435 Faith, the benefit of it,

432
A character of the English by a great preacher,

The means of confirming it,

$
By the Bantam ambassador,

557 Falsehood, the goddess of,

557
A distemper they are very much afflicted with,

Falsehood in man a recommendation to the fair ses
Englishman, ike peculiar uhssing of being burn one,

582 Falsehood and dissimulation, the inconvenience of it porn

135 petual,
The Spectator's speculations upon the English tongue,
Englishmen not naturally talkative,

135 False wit, the region of it,
The English tongue much adulterated,

135, 148 Falstaff (Sir John), a famous butt,
Enmity, the good fruits of it,

165 Fam generally coveted,
Emhusiasm, ihe nisery of it. *

Divided into three different species,
Ensy. the ,l state of an envious man,

Difficulty of obtaining and preserving fames
ilis rel et

The inconveniences attending the desire of it,

19
The way to obtain his favour,

A follower of merit,

19
The abhorrelice of envy a certain note of a great mind, 253

The palace of Fame described,
Epaminondas, his honourable death,

Courts compared to it,
Ephesian mitrun, the story of her,

133 Familiarities indecent in society,
Epboum, the Quaker, the Spectator's fellow-traveller in a

11 Families: the ill measures taken by great families in the et

cation of their younger sons,
stagr-Coatia,
His reproof to a recruiting officer in the same coach,

132 Family m dness in pedigrees,
And advice to him at their parting,

132 Fan, the exercise of it,
Epictetus, his observation upon the female sex,

132 Fancy, all its images enter by the sight,
His allusion on human lite,

The daughter of Liberty,

219
His rule for a person's behaviour under detraction,

The character of Fancy,
His saying of sorrow,

355 Her calamities,
His advice to dreamers,

397 Fashion, the force of it,
F.pigram on Heatissa,

524 Men of' fashion, who,
Epistles recommendatory, the injustice and absurdity of most

52

A society proposed to be erected for the inspectivo de

fashions,
Epistolatory poetry, the two kinds of styles,

A description of fashion,
Episph of a charitable man,

618) Fashions, the vanity of them wherr in beneficial,
On the Countess Dowager of Pembroke,

177 A repository proposed to be built for them.
Epitaphis, the extravagance of some, and modesty of others,

The balance of fashions leads on the side of France,
An epitaph written by Ben Jonson,

26 The evil influence of fashion on the married state.
Equanimity, without it we can have no true taste of life,

33 Fashionable society, (a board of directors of the un
Equestrian order of ladics,

143 posed, with the requisite qualifications of the 20t
Its origin,

bers,
Equestrian ladies, who,

104 Father, the affection of one for a daughter,
Equiuges, the splendour of them in France,

435 Favours, of ladies, not to be boasted of,
A great templation to the female sex,

15 Faults (secret), how to find them out,
Erasmus insulted by a parcel of Trojans,
Erracum. a sad ont committed in printing the Bible,

239

man,
Error, his habitation described,

579 Fear, how necessary it is to subdue it,
How like to truth,

460

Passion of tear treated,
Errors and prepossessions diffieult to be avoided,

460 Fear of death often mortal,
Essay on the pleasures of the imagination, trom

117 Feasts, the gluttony of modern ones,
Essays, wherein ditlering from motheula al discourses,

411 to 421 Feeling not so perfect a sense as siglat,
Estaies generally purchased by the slower parts of man.
kind,

rity,
322 Female literature in want of regulatio,

324

French po

Fribblers,
Frnds ki
Inendship

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408

565

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344

100

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102
190
460

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62

2

No.

No.
Female oratory, the excellency of it,
241 Gladio's dream,

197
Rakes deseribed,

336 Gladness of heart to be moderated and restrained, but not
Virtues, which the most shining,

81 banished by virtne,
Fiction, the advantage the writers have in it to please Glaphyea, her story out of Josephus,

110
the imagination,

419 Glorjana, the design upon her,
What other writers please in it,
420 Glory, the love of it,

139
tridelia, her duty
to her father,

449 In what
the perfection of it consists,

139
Tidelio, his adventures, and transformation into a looking. How to be preservedl,

172, 218
glass,

392 Goat's-milk, the effect it had upon a man bred with it,
Thorinal causes of delight in objects,
413 God, the being of one the greatest of certainties,

381
Lie bare and open,

413 An instance of his exuberant goodness and mercy, 519
fine gentle men, a character frequently misapplied by the A being of infinite perfections,

513
fair sex,

75 A contemplation of his omnipresence and his omni.
flattery described,

460 science,
How grateful,
621 He cannot be absent from us,

565
Flavis, her mother's rival,

Considerations on his ubiquity,

571
Her character and amour with Cynthio,

398 Goud-breeding, the great revolution that has happened in
flavilla liberal of her snuff at church,

that article,

119
Spoiled by a marriage,

437 Good-humour, the necessity of it,
Flora, an attendant on the spring,

425 Good-nature more agreeable in conversation than wit, 169
The Flutter, Sir Fopling,' a comedy ; some remarks upon it,

The necessity of it,

109
es latter of the fan, the variety of motions in it,

Born with us,

169
Foible (Sir Jeoffry), a kind keeper,

A moral virtue,

177
den Follies and defects mistaken by us in ourselves for worth,

An
endless source of pleasure,

196
Fontenelle, his saying of the ambitious and covetous,

576 Good-nature and cheerfulness the two great ornaments of
i Fools, great plenty of them the first day of April,

virtue,

243
Naturally misehievous,
485 Gond sense and good-nature always go together,

437
de Fop, what sort of persons deserve that character,
280 Goosequill (William), clerk to the lawyers' club,

372
Forehead esteemed an organ of speech,
231 Gospel gossips described,

46
des Fortius, his character,

422 Goths, in poetry, who,
Fortunatus, the trader, his character,
443 Government, what form of it the most reasonable,

287
Fortune, often unjustly complained of,

282 Grace at meals
practised by the pagans,

458
To be controlled by nothing but infinite wisdom, 293 Gracefulness of action, the excellency of it,

292
Fortune.stealers, who they are ihat set up for such,

311 Grammar-schools, a common fault observed in them, 353
Distinguished from fortune hunters,

311 Grandeur and minuteness, the extremes pleasing to the
Frankair (Charles), a powerful and successful speaker, 484

fancy,

420
Freart (Monsieur), what he says of the manner of both an. Grandmother, Sir Roger de Coverley's great, great, great
cients and moderns in architecture,

415

grandmother's receipt for a hasty-pudding and a white-
Freeport (Sir Andrew), a member of the Spectator's club,

pot,

109
His moderation in point of politics,
3.
126 Gratitude, the most pleasing exercise of the mind,

453
His defence of merchants,
1:4 A divine poem upon it,

453
Divides his time between business and pleasure, 232 Great men, the tax paid by them to the public,

101
His opinion of beggars,

232

Not truly known till some years after their death, 101
His resolution to retire from business,

549 Greatness of objects, what understood by it, in the pleasures
Freethinkers put into Trophonius's cave,
599 of the imagination,

412, 413
French much addicted to grimace,
481 Greeks, a custom practised by them,

189
Their levity,

435 Greeks and Romans, the different methods observed by
French poets, wherein to be imitated by the English,
45 them in the education of their children,

313
Fribblers, who,
288 Greeks and Trojans, who so called,

239
Friends kind to our faults,
399 Green, why called in poetry the cheerful colour,

387
Friendship, the great benefit of it,
68 Green-sickness, Sabina Rentfree's letter about it,

431
The medicine of life,
68 Grinning: a grioning prize,

173
The qualifications of a good friend,
68 Grotto, verses on one,

632
An essay upon friendship,
385 Guardian of the fair sex, the Spectator so,

449
Defined,
385 Gyges and Aglais, their story,

610
What sort of friend the most useful,

385 Gymnosophists (Indian), the method used by them in the
A necessary ingredient in the married state,
490 education of their disciples,

337
Preferred by Spenser to love and natural affection, 490
Fritilla's dream,

597 HABITS, different, arising from different professions, 197
Frolic, what ought truly to be termed so,

358 Hamadryads, the fable of them to the honour of trees,
Frugality the support of generosity,
107 Hamlet's reflections on looking upon Yorick's skull,

404
The true basis of liberality,

346 Handkerehief, the great machine for moving pity in a
** Fonnel (Will', the toper, his character,

569 tragedy,
Futurity, the strong inclination a man bas to know it, 604 Handsome people generally fantastical,

144
A weakness,

604 The Spectator's list of some handsome ladies,
The misery of knowing it,
604 Happiness (true), an enemy to pomp and noise,

15
The happiness of souls in heaven treated of,

600
GALLANTRY: wherein true gallantry ought to consist,

An argument that God has assigned us for it,
Gaming, the folly of it,

93 Hard words ought not to be pronounced right by well-bred
Gaper, the sign of the gaper frequent in Amsterdam,

ladies,

45
Garden, the innocent defights of one,

477 Hardness of heart in parents towards their children most in-
What part of Kensingion Garden to be most admired, 477

exeusable,

181
In what manner gardening may be compared to poetry, 477 Harlot, a description of one out of the Proverbs,

410
Gardening, errors in it,
414 Harris (Mr.), the organ bulder, his proposal,

552
Why the English gardens are not so entertaining to the Harry Tersett, and his lady; their way of living,

100
fancy as those in France and Italy,

414 Hate : why a man ought not to hate even his enemies,
Observations concerning improvenient both for benefit Head-dress, the most variable thing in nature,

98
and beauty,
414 Extravagantly high in the fourteenth century,

98
Applied to education,

With what success attacked by a monk of that age, 98
Genealogy, a letter about,
612 Heads never the wiser for being bald,

497
Generosity not always to be commended,

340 Health, the pleasures of the faney more conducive to it than
Geniu, what properly a great one,

those of the understanding,
Gentry of England, generally speaking, in debt,
82 Hearts, a vision of them,

587
Geography of a jest setted,
138 Heathen philosopher,

150
Georgies (Virgil's), the beauty of their subjects,
417 Heaven, its glory,

580
Germanicus, his taste of true glory,
238 Described by Mr. Cowley,

590
Gesture. good in oratory,
407 The notions several nations have of it,

600
Ghosts, warned out of the playhouse,
36 What Dr. Tillotson says of it,

600
The appearance of a ghost of great efficacy in an Eng. Heaven and hell, the notions of, conformable to the light of
lish theatre,

nature,

447
What ghosts say should be a little discoloured, 419 Heavens, verses on the glory of them,

465
The description of them pleasing to the fancy, 419 Hebrew idioms run into English,

405
Why we incline to believe them,

419 Heirs and elder brothers frequently spoiled in their educa.
Not a village in England formerly without one,
419 tion,

123
Shakspeare's the best,
419 Henpeckt d husband described,

179
Gifts of fortune more valued than they ought to be, 294' Heraelitus, a remarkable saying of luis,

487
Gigglers in church reproved,
158 Hermit, his saying to a lewd young fellow,

575
Gipsies: an adventure between Sir Roger, the Spectator, Hered and Mariamne, their story from Josephus,

171
and some gipsies,
130 Herodotus, wherein eonde uned by the Spectator,

483
Giving and forgiving, two different things,

189 Heroes in an English tragedy generally lovers,
Bladiators of Rome, what Cicero says of them,
430 Heroism, an essay upon it,

601

580

144

7

609

47

125

455

100

411

40

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