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THE.

PHRENOLOGICAL JOURNAL.

No XV.

ARTICLE I.

ON THE FACULTY OF COMPARISON.

FEELING OF RESEMBLANCE.Dr Brown.

SENSE OF ANALOGY.-Gall.

DR Gall observed various persons who, in order to convince “ others, had, in every conversation, recourse to examples, simili“ tudes, and analogies, and seldom to (strict) reasoning and philo“sophical argument. In these he found, in the midst of the supe“rior part of the forehead, an elevation which presented the form of a reversed pyramid, and he named this organ, according to its “ functions, the organ of Analogy. This organ is developed in “all popular preachers beloved by the crowd, who speak by exam“ples and parables, and who choose their similitudes from facts “ which are generally known. Gall accordingly possesses the skulls “ of two Jesuits who had this organ and its faculty in a high degree. Indeed, in order to persuade and to affect, the speaker or orator must speak by analogy-he must bring spiritual things “ near to terrestrial,--he must imitate the manner of the preaching « of Christ.”

Such is the account given by Dr Spurzheim in the first edition of his Physiognomical System, of the observations made by Dr Gall on the functions of this part of the brain. These observations lead to the conclusion, that this is the faculty which perceives and delights in resemblances. Examples, similitudes, analogies, and parables, and all those me

VOL. IV.-No XV.

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« Danish Journal for Phrenology," edited by Dr Otto, will be published. He will be assisted by four physicians, who have been named to us, and several lawyers, the sale o

-We observe that an animated discussion on Phrenology has place in the Philosophical Society here, which has led to

ence of the doctrines in the Hull Advertiser, by Mr Tho

jor. We rejoice that Phrenology has so able advo

Dykes, and our correspondent Mr Thomas Buch

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Phrenology, by Mr Adam, read at the bilo

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ral. It would prove both instructive del

ers of an ordinary magazine, who rere

rst principles of the science.
very lately, a letter from Mr Lead-
ological Society of Glasgow, accom-
Peruvian skulls to the Phrenologi-

insert in this Number, along with but our limits are exhausted, and

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251 1920
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THE

PHRENOLOGICAL JOURNAL.

No XV.

ARTICLE I.

ON THE FACULTY OF COMPARISON.

FEELING OF RESEMBLANCE.-Dr Brown.

SENSE OF ANALOGY.-Gall.

DR Gall observed various persons who, in order to convince

others, had, in every conversation, recourse to examples, simili“tudes, and analogies, and seldom to (strict) reasoning and philo

sophical argument. In these he found, in the midst of the superior part of the forehead, an elevation which presented the form of a reversed pyramid, and he named this organ, according to its “ functions, the organ of Analogy. This organ is developed in “all popular preachers beloved by the crowd, who speak by exam

ples and parables, and who choose their similitudes from facts " which are generally known. Gall accordingly possesses the skulls of two Jesuits who had this organ and its faculty in a high de

gree. Indeed, in order to persuade and to affect, the speaker or “ orator must speak by analogy-he must bring spiritual things “ near to terrestrial, he must imitate the manner of the preaching « of Christ.”

Such is the account given by Dr Spurzheim in the first edition of his Physiognomical System, of the observations made by Dr Gall on the functions of this part of the brain. These observations lead to the conclusion, that this is the faculty which perceives and delights in resemblances. Examples, similitudes, analogies, and parables, and all those me

Vol. IV.No XV.

X

Danish Journal for Phrenology,” edited by Dr Otto, will be published. He will be assisted by four physicians, who have been named to us, and several lawyers.

HULL. We observe that an animated discussion on Phrenology has taken place in the Philosophical Society here, which has led to an able defence of the doctrines in the Hull Advertiser, by Mr Thomas Dykes, junior. We rejoice that Phrenology has so able advocates in Huli as Mr Dykes, and our correspondent Mr Thomas Buchanan.

INVERNESS.—We have received for publication, an able and eloquent Essay in favour of Phrenology, by Mr Adam, read at the Philosophical Society, Inverness; but regret that its statements are too elementary for our Journal. It would prove both instructive and entertaining to the readers of an ordinary magazine, who require to be informed of the first principles of the science.

GLASGOW.–We received, very lately, a letter from Mr Leadbetter, secretary to the Phrenological Society of Glasgow, accompanying a donation of six native Peruvian skulls to the Phrenological Society, which we intended to insert in this Number, along with some observations on the skulls; but our limits are exhausted, and it is postponed till next publication.

PAISLEY.-Mr Torbet has resumed his able and interesting lectures on Phrenology.

We have in types an article on some Mozambique skulls, presented by Dr Sibbald, but it is unavoidably postponed till next Number.

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS. The conductors of the Phrenological Journal have received numcrous complaints from country subscribers, of delay in receiving their copies, and beg to mention, that the general cause of it is the following :--A subscriber in the country desires his bookseller in the country to procure the Journal.' This bookseller writes to his correspondent in Edinburgh to forward each number with his first parcel after publication. But if the country bookseller's trade be not extensive, there may be no parcel to him from his correspondent in Edinburgh for weeks or months in succession ; and in this way the Journal may lie with the Edinburgh correspondent a long time before it is sent off. The remedy for this is, for country subscribers to send an order direct to the publishers in Edinburgh or London, whose names are on the title-page, desiring them to transmit each number immediately on publication, pointing out, at the same time, by what conveyance it is to be sent. If this is inconvenient or expensive, the next best method would be, to employ a bookseller in the country who is attentive to business, and has frequent parcels from Edinburgh or London. The conductors solicit every information on this subject from the subscribers, as they anxiously desire to attain punctuality in delivery of the copies.

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