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wife, instead of entering by another door, squeeze to her seat, between the Queen and her Majesty's prayer-book. He afterwards, for similar spiteful reasons, hazarded his wife's existence by bringing her from Hampton Court to St. James's, almost in the very instant of child-birth.

Looking out, one day, from a window in Kensington Palace, and seeing title-hunting Bubb Doddington go by, he said, “That man is reckoned one of the most sensible men in England ; and yet, with all his cleverness, I have just nicked him out of £5000.”

Traits like these made his parents call to mind what an honest governor said of him when he was a boy. The governor complained of some tricks which he had been playing; the mother, not seeing what such

conduct foreshadowed, said, good-naturedly, “Ah, those are pages' tricks, I conceive.” “Pages' tricks !” cried the governor; “I wish to God, madam, they were. They are tricks of lacqueys and rascals.”

The nicker of Bubb Doddington nicked himself, at the age of forty-nine, out of life and a throne, by putting on a thin dress during cold weather, because he felt himself hot with a pleurisy !

If Pope, who had been introduced to this Prince, and who took his part against his mother, had but seen these and other notices of him, the truth of which is now admitted by every body, he never would have said a word against the poor Queen, even though himself had been more injured in her estimation by Hervey's venom, than we have no doubt he

was.

CHAPTER VIII.

PALACE CONTINUED - A COURT DRAMA — SUPPOSED

DEATH OF LORD HERVEY-TALK AT THE QUEEN's

BREAKFAST-TABLE - DIVINE

SERVICE — COURT SELF-CONDEMNED —

DRAWING-ROOM - HERVEY

DEATH OF GEORGE THE SECOND.

LORD HERVEY, for the amusement of the Queen, and for the recommendation of himself at the expense of others, wrote a little Kensington drama, called “The Death of Lord Hervey, or a Morning at Court.” We extract from it two or three lively passages, relating to a breakfast, a divine service, and a levee; because in the one, the reader will find himself in company with Queen Caroline, under circumstances characteristic of her manners towards those about her ; in the second, a very candid exhibition is made of her indifference for court-chaplains; and in the third, he will see what the royal talk on court-days must, to a certain extent, of necessity, be. Hervey takes insidious advantage of the favour he was in with her Majesty; whose willingness to think the best of her gossiping lord of the Bedchamber would not have been so amused with the thing as she was, could she have seen the Memoir in which she has been preserved for posterity. The simultaneous emphasis with which she divides her emotions between the news of a friend's death and the delights of a cup of chocolate, and the sarcasms which plentifully acidulate the sweets of her obliging enquiries round the court circle, would have come out with stronger and more suspicious effect.

The tragical exclamation of Princess Caroline, when she first hears of the supposed death, and the striking circumstance of her twisting off the thumbs of her glove, are meant to imply the love which this poor girl, the most amiable of the family, is said to have entertained for the unworthy biographer. How he could have alluded to it at all, as a gentleman, especially through such a medium as a court effusion like this, written for the purpose of entertaining her mother, and which every body would read “ confidentially” whom his vanity could get to do so, must

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