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the point of lying-in, yet he is writing to Lord Howe for leave of absence for a year, the consequences of which I stated to him, and told him the handle which would be made against him by wrangling, foul-mouthed counsel. Mrs. M

loses her temper in the whole of this business, and complains highly of Sir William's neglect. She says, that she has been asked, “Who is the father of Lady B 's child ?" an instance of insolent cruelty scarcely to be paralleled, which would be ventured against

few men.

I have brought more forward the circumstances of Mr. and Mrs. B-k-r, and the B -s, because I suppose you would wish to avoid the possibility of seeing either family. You may make me always the pretext of not staying where they are, if the unlucky star of the hour should bring you together.

Mrs. Gordon, I believe, agrees fully in sentiment with me.

I find this agreeable neighbour increase every day in my esteem, and she could not make her court more effectually to me than by talking in the style she always does of my dear daughter.

I shall send you by the Paris diligence of next Tuesday a present for the Dutchess's fête from me. The box will be directed to you, and on the direction will be at the top +++. You will know by this it is for the Dutchess. I wish you to give it her in my name, the veille of her fête, and only mention the anxiety I had for its arriving safe, and that you

do not know the contents of the box. The present is de toute beauté et de toute magnificence, and will convince her of the sense I entertain of her goodness to you. It should be carefully unpacked, and in case of an accident, let the blame fall on her servants, and let it happen in her presence, for I am satisfied there can be no misfortune to it previous to its arrival in Paris. I hope likewise to write in time to her on her fête, that you may receive it, and present the letter too in the most a-propos moment.

I mean to leave London Thursday, the 5th of August, in the evening, to lie that night at Dartford, and on Friday, the 6th, to reach Dover, and lie at the City of London there. I shall write to Mrs. Belcher in time to secure the best apartments. Considering the uncertainty of the passage from Dover to Calais, the last parcel I shall send you will be by the diligence of Saturday, July 24, but I shall probably write you a few lines by the Tuesday's post following, which will be on the 27th of July.

While I thus mention to you my ar.

rangements, I desire to interfere with yours, and I wish you not only to see Ermenonville and Chantilly at your leisure, but to give a day or two to repose and writing letters, as I mentioned in my former. My noble companions of antiquity will comfort me at Dover till I have the higher pleasure of your society, and I shall daily inhale gales of health from old ocean.

My nephew Charles Wilkes has accepted the office to the new bank of the States of New York of cashier, with a salary of 2001. a year ; there the beginning of August.

I received this morning the patterns, and I so well like them all, that I wish you to order six of each, and three fruitbaskets of the pattern No. 1, the sides to be open, and to settle about the safe conveyance here, and the paying for them by drafts on me. I should be glad

and he goes

you would give three or four hours to pick me up a few odd pieces in the shops, of no great expense. I know your taste so well that I leave the management of the whole to you.

Are the patterns of the china to be sent back? I hope not. I wish

I wish you to bring a catalogue of new books, new maps, &c. with you from the most celebrated booksellers and mapsellers. I will go to Madame de Cageneck's again the first opportunity, and mention what you desire about the vin de paille, &c.

Friday Evening, Seven. The French post is just come in, and has brought me your letter of July 11th, and the 12th, at half past seven this morning. I feel for all you have suffered from the character of Mademoiselle Sophie. I entirely approve your conduct, and I will take care that Susan shall at

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