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the field adjoining to the late Castle. There are three very good bedchambers, an excellent eating-room, and breakfastparlour. It is separate from every thing; and I find the great people sometimes have it for four or five days. . If the scheme is agreeable to my dear daughter, I would propose to have it from Saturday sevennight to the Monday following. I would meet you there on my return from Bath to dine at three on Saturday the 28th, the next morning go to chapel with our Sovereign at Windsor, dine at the famous Cliefden spring, should the weather prove favourable, andin the evening see the company on the terrace of Windsor Castle. The cottage is engaged on the Monday evening on account of the Tuesday races. I wish you to let me know by the next

you

relish my plan, that I may write accordingly to Mrs. March. If you choose to bring Mrs. Gordon, or

post, if

Miss Gordon, in Miss's coach, there can be no objection, and you would dine in town easily on the Monday, May the 30th.

I was at the rooms last night with the French Ambassador, who is surprisingly recovered. Lady Fleming, Lord Conyngham, &c. &c. lords and ladies, all make many inquiries after you. To-day I dine in the Circus with my old friend Mr. Plunkett. Lady Fleming is wonderfully agreeable, but rather too saucy for her matron age, &c.

My compliments to all the Prince's Court gentry. I have not yet seen the Molineux’s, who are at the public breakfast, and yesterday at private parties all day.

Bon jour, ma très chère fille.

LETTER XXV.

South Parade, Bath,

Tuesday, May 17, 1785. I am just starting, my dearest Polly, for a great fair, which is to be held at Holloway, but I thought it proper to put up first' in an envelope Miss Molineux's letter to you, and a note to me from her mother.

Since I wrote the above at ten this morning, the post is arrived, and brings me your charming letter of Saturday night, with the Bulletin, for which I am much obliged to you. I return it.

I am glad we have so many volumes of Voltaire. Why should you leave them in my cabinet ? Why not undo the packet, and look them over? Good morrow, très chère et très

aimée fille,

LETTER XXVI.

South Parade, Bath,

Wednesday, May 18, 1785.

I beg the favour of you, dear Polly, to tell Mrs. Gordon, that I went myself to Colonel Gould's, in River Street, with her little packet for Miss Gwynn. She does not live at the Colonel's, but was to dine there that day, and Mrs. Gould took charge of it. The Colonel is, confined to his bed. The quarter of a guineu is at a relation's, still very ill from a great swelling in her neck, a complaint under which she has laboured for many months.

I saw Mrs. M and her daughter yesterday, and they are both in perfect health. She complains much about a letter from her son since Mr. M's

visit to Lisle, which I am to wade through after dinner to-day. I sincerely pity her, but I do not comprehend how two females can contrive to rusticate more and more every month at Bath.

My attentions to her are redoubled from her unfortunate situation.

Mr. Hartford has new furnished and papered the upper apartments, and with the aid of my prints they look very gay, but not cheerful without you.

I have at eleven this morning received together your two letters of Monday evening and Tuesday afternoon, for both which I thank you, and for the extract from the Dutchess de la Valliere's letter. It is well written ; yet were I a subject of France, I could not sing the praises of the minister who conducted the war before the last. I believe however in all the amiable qualities and lively wit of the Duke of Choiseul, but not

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