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(ACT of July 6th, 1798.)

of the constitution of the United States, &c. 4th, In case he had held any title of nobility, &c. he must make an express renunciation thereof. Provided that as to aliens then residing in the United States, the term of residence required should be two years only. Children of naturalized persons, under age at the time of naturalization and residing in the United States, and also the children of citizens, born out of the limits of the United States, to be considered citizens. Provided the right of citizenship should not descend to persons whose fathers had never been resident in the United States.]

ACT of June 18th, 1798. 3 Bioren, 61. (Repealed.)

[This act, in force until 14th April 1802, provided that no alien should become a citizen, unless he had, Jive years before his admission, declared his intention in the manner prescribed by the act of 29th January, 1795, and had resided fourteen years in the United States, previous to his application. Provided that any alien residing in the United States before the 29th of January 1795, might, within one year from the date of this act, or having made his declaration, &c. according to the provisions of the act of 29th January, 1795, might, within four years after having made such declaration, be admitted on proving that he had resided five years within the United States. But no alien enemy should be admitted.]

ACT of July 6th, 1798. 3 Bioren, 75.
An Act respecting alien enemies.

2. Sec. I. Whenever there shall be a declared war between the United States and any foreign nation or government, or any invasion or predatory incursion shall be perpetrated, attempted, or threatened against the territory of the United States, by any foreign nation or government, and the president of the United States shall make public proclamation of the event, all natives, citizens, denizens, or subjects of the hostile nation or government, being males of the age of fourteen years and upwards, who shall be within the United States, and not actually naturalized, shall be liable to be apprehended, restrained, secured and removed, as alien enemies. And the president of the United States is hereby authorized, in any event, as aforesaid, by his proclamation thereof, or other public act, to direct the conduct to be observed, on the part of the United States, towards the aliens who shall become liable, as aforesaid; the manner and degree of the restraint to which they shall be subject, and in what cases, and upon what security their residence shall be permitted, and to provide for the removal of those, who, not being permitted to reside within the United States, shall refuse or neglect to depart therefrom; and to establish any other regulations which shall be found necessary in (ACT of July 8th, 1798.)

the premises and for the public safety: Provided, that aliens resident within the United States, who shall become liable as enemies, in the manner aforesaid, and who shall not be chargeable with actual hostility, or other crime against the public safety, shall be allowed, for the recovery, disposal, and removal of their goods and effects, and for their departure, the full time which is, or shall be stipulated by any treaty, where any shall have been between the United States, and the hostile nation or government, of which they shall be natives, citizens, denizens or subjects: and where no such treaty shall have existed, the president of the United States may ascertain and declare such reasonable time as may be consistent with the public safety, and according to the dictates of humanity and national hospitality.

3. Sec. Ii. After any proclamation shall be made as aforesaid, it shall be the duty of the several courts of the United States, and of each state, having criminal jurisdiction, and of the several judges and justices of the courts of the United States, and they are respectively, authorized upon complaint, against any alien or alien enemies, as aforesaid, who shall be resident and at large within such jurisdiction or district, to the danger of the public peace or safety, and contrary to the tenor or intent of such proclamation, or other regulations which the president of the United States shall and may establish in the premises, to cause such alien or aliens to be duly apprehended and convened before such court, judge or justice; and after a full examination and hearing on such complaint, and sufficient cause therefor appearing, shall and may order such alien or aliens to be removed out of the territory of the United States, or to give sureties of their good behaviour, or to be otherwise restrained, conformably to the proclamation or regulations which shall and may be established as aforesaid, and may imprison, or otherwise secure such alien 6r aliens, until the order which shall and may be made, as aforesaid, shall be performed.

4. Sec. Iii. It shall be the duty of the marshal of the district trict in which any alien enemy shall be apprehended, who by the president of the United States, or by order of any court, judge, or justice, as aforesaid, shall be required to depart, and to be removed, as aforesaid, to provide therefor, and to execute such order, by himself or his deputy, or other discreet person or persons to be employed by him, by causing a removal of such alien out of the territory of the United States; and for such removal, the marshal shall have the warrant of the president of the United States, or of the court, judge, or justice ordering the same, as the case may be. [Infra, 12.]

ACT of April 14th, 1802. 3 Bioren, 475.

An Act to establish an uniform rule of naturalization, and to repeal the acts heretofore passed on that subject.

5. Sec. I. Any alien, being a free white person, may be admitted to become a citizen of the United States, or any of them, on the following conditions, and not otherwise:

First, That he shall have declared, on oath or affirmation, before the supreme, superior, district, or circuit court, of some one of the states, or of the territorial districts of the United States, or a circuit or district court of the United States, three years., at least, before his admission, that it was, bona fide, his intention to become a citizen of the United States, and to renounce forever all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, whatever, and particularly, by name, the prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, whereof such alien may, at the time, be a citizen or subject. [Infra, 10.]

Secondly, That he shall, at the time of his application to be admitted, declare, on oath or affirmation, before some one of the courts aforesaid, that he will support the constitution of the United States, and that he doth absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to every foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, whatever, and particularly, by name, the prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, whereof he was before a citizen or subject; which proceedings shall be recorded by the clerit of the court.

Thirdly, That the court admitting such alien shall be satisfied that he has resided within the United States five years, at least, and within the state or territory where such court is at the time held, one year at least; and it shall further appear to their satisfaction, that, during that time, he has behaved as a man of a good moral character, attached to the principles of the constitution of the United States, and well disposed to the good order and happiness of the same: Provided, That the oath of the applicant shall, in no case, be allowed to prove his residence.

Fourthly, That in case the alien, applying to be admitted to citizenship, shall have borne any hereditary title, or been of any of the orders of nobility, in the kingdom or state from which he came, he shall, in addition to the above requisites, make an express renunciation of his tide or order of nobility, in the court to which his application shall be made, which renunciation shall be recorded in the said court: Provided, That no alien, who shall be a native, citizen, denizen, or subject, of any country, state, or sovereign, with whom the United States shall be at war, at the time of his application, shall be then admitted to be a citizen of the United States: Provided, also, That any alien who was residing within the limits, and under the jurisdiction, of the United States, before the twenty-ninth day of January, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, may be admitted to become a citizen, on due proof made to some one of the courts aforesaid, that he has re(ACT of April 14th, 1802.)

sided two years, at least, within and under the jurisdiction of the United States, and one year, at least, immediately preceding his application, within the state or territory where such court is at the time held; and on ,his declaring on oath, or affirmation, that he will support the constitution of the United States, and that he doth absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, whatever, and particularly, by name, the prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, whereof he was before a citizen or subject; and, moreover, on its appearing to the satisfaction of the court, that, during the said term of two years, he has behaved as a man of good moral character, attached to the constitution of the United States, and well disposed to the good order and happiness of the same; and where the alien, applying for admission to citizenship, shall have borne any hereditary title, or been of any of the orders of nobility in the kingdom or state from which he came, on his moreover making in the court an express renunciation of his title or order of nobility, before he shall be entitled to such admission: all of which proceedings, required in this proviso to be performed in the court, shall be recorded by the clerk thereof: And provided, also. That any alien who was residing within the limits, and under the jurisdiction, of the United States, at any time between the said twenty-ninth day of January, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, and the eighteenth day of June, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-eight, may, within two years after the passing of this act, be admitted to become a citizen, without a compliance with the first condition above specified.

6. Sec. Ii. All free white persons, being aliens, who may arrive in the United States after the passing of this act, shall, in order to become citizens of the United States, make registry, and obtain certificates, in the following manner, to wit: every person desirous of being naturalized shall, if of the age of twenty-one years, make report of himself; or if under the age of twenty-one years, or held in service, shall be reported by his parent, guardian, master, or mistress, to the clerk of the district court of the district where such alien or aliens shall arrive, or to some other court of record of the United States, or of either of the territorial districts of the same, or of a particular state; and such report shall ascertain the name, birth place, age, nation, and allegiance, of each alien, together with the country whence he or she migrated, and the place of his or her intended settlement: and it shall be the duty of such clerk, on receiving such report, to record the same in his office, and to grant to the person making such report, and to each individual concerned therein, whenever he shall be required, a certificate, under his hand and seal of office, of such report and registry; and for receiving and registering each report of an individual or family, he shall receive fifty cents; and for each certificate, granted pursuant to this act, to an individual or family, fifty cents; and such certificate shall be exhibited to the (ACT of March 26th, 1804.)

court by every alien who may arrive in the United States, after the passing of this act, on his application to be naturalized, as evidence of the time of his arrival within the United States.

7. Sec. Hi. Every court of record, in any individual state, having common law jurisdiction, and a seal, and clerk or prothonotary, shall be considered as a district court within the meaning of this act; and every alien, who may have been naturalized in any such court, shall enjoy, from and after the passing of the act, the same rights and privileges, as if he had been naturalized in a district or circuit court of the United States.

8. Sec . Iv. The children of persons duly naturalized under any of the laws of the United States, or who, previous to the passing of any law on that subject by the government of the United States, may have become citizens of any one of the said states, under the laws thereof, being under the age of twenty-one years, at the time of their parent's being so naturalized or admitted to the rights of citizenship, shall, if dwelling in the United States, be considered as citizens of the United States; and the children of persons who now are, or have been, citizens of the United States, shall, though born out of the limits and jurisdiction of the United States, be considered as citizens of the United States: Provided, That the right of citizenship shall not descend to persons whose fathers have never resided within the United States: Provided alto, That no person heretofore proscribed by any state, or who has been legally convicted of having joined the army of Great Britain during the late war, shall be admitted a citizen, as aforesaid, without the consent of the legislature of the state in which such person was proscribed.

9. Sec. V. All acts heretofore passed respecting naturalization, are hereby, repealed.

ACT of March 26th, 1804. 3 Bioren, 614.

An act in addition to an act entitled, "An act to establish an uniform rule of naturalization, and to repeal the acts heretofore passed on that subject."

10. Sec. I. Any alien being a free white person, who was residing within the limits and under the jurisdiction of the United States, at any time between the eighteenth day of June, 1798, and the fourteenth day of April, 1802, and who has continued to reside within the same, may be admitted to become a citizen of the United States, without a compliance with the first condition specified in the first section of the act, entitled, " An act to establish an uniform rule of naturalization, and to repeal the acts heretofore passed on the subject."

11. Sec . Ii. When any alien, who shall have complied with the first condition specified in the first section of the said original act, and who shall have pursued the directions prescribed in the second section of the said act, may die before he is actually naturalized, the widow and the children of such alien, shall be considered as

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