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62

THE BEAUTY OF VIRTUE

LL earthly charms, however dear,

eye ear,

will quickly fade and fly; of earthly glory faint the blaze, and soon the transitory rays

in endless darkness die.
The nobler beauties of the just
shall never moulder in the dust

or know a sad decay;
their honours time and death defy,
and round the throne of heaven on high

beam everlasting day.

H. MORE

63

THE EARTH'S BOUNTY

'HE Earth that in her genial breast

a

where wafted by the warm south-west

it floats at pleasure,
yields, thankful, of her very best,

to nurse her treasure:

true to her trust, tree, herb or reed,
she renders for each scattered seed,
and to her Lord with duteous heed

gives large increase:
thus year by year she works unfeed,

and will not cease.

J. KEBLE

64

SHE

HE had left all on earth for him,

her home of wealth, her name of pride,
and now his lamp of love was dim,
and, sad to tell, she had not died.
She watched the crimson sun's decline,
from some lone rock that fronts the sea,-
'I would, O burning heart of mine,
there were an ocean-rest for thee.

'The thoughtful moon awaits her turn,
the stars compose their choral crown,
but those soft lights can never burn,
till once the fiery sun is down.'

R. M. MILNES

65

THE PRAYER OF ORPHEUS

BY

Y the streams that ever flow,

by the fragrant winds that blow
o'er the Elysian flowers;
by those happy souls who dwell
in yellow meads of asphodel

or amaranthine bowers;
by the heroes' armed shades,
glittering through the gloomy glades;
by the youths that died for love,

wandering in the myrtle grove,
restore, restore Eurydice to life:
oh take the husband, or return the wife!

A. POPE

66

THE STUDY OF NATURE BRINGS NOT HAPPINESS

OR can it bliss you bring why matter changeth, whence each form doth spring; nor that your fame should range, and after-worlds it blow

from Tanais to Nile, from Nile to Gange:
and these have not the power

to free the mind from fears,
nor hideous horror can allay one hour,
when Death in steel doth glance,
in sickness lurk or years,
and wakes the soul from out her mortal trance.

W. DRUMMOND

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TURN, Fortune, turn thy wheel and lower the proud ;

turn thy wild wheel thro' sunshine, storm and cloud; thy wheel and thee we neither love nor hate.

Turn, Fortune, turn thy wheel with smile or frown;
with that wild wheel we go not up or down;
our hoard is little, but our hearts are great.
Smile and we smile, the lords of many lands;
frown and we smile, the lords of our own hands:
for man is man and master of his fate.
Turn, turn thy wheel above the staring crowd;
thy wheel and thou are shadows in the cloud;
thy wheel and thee we neither love nor hate.

A. TENNYSON

68

TO THE CICADA

, " ,

! thou who
of weeping skies, on the tall poplar-tree,
perch'd swayingly, thyself dost still amuse,

and the hush'd grove, with thy sweet minstrelsyafter long tedious winters, when the sun

through the brief summer speeds his whirling ray, with thy shrill chiding, as he hastens on,

check his too rapid wheels and urge delay. The brightest day that dawns on mortal eyes,

hurries—ah! fleetly hurries to its closene'er long enough to rapture are his joys, ever too long to anguish are her woes.

F. WRANGHAM

69

DRINKING SONG

CAR

‘ARE, thou canker of all joys!

see the tyrant's reign is o'er; fill the merry bowl, my boys,

join the bacchanalian roar; o'er the merry midnight bowl,

O! how merry will we be, day was made for vulgar souls,

night, my boys, for you and me. Seize the villain, plunge him in,

see! the hated miscreant dies; mirth, with all thy train come in,

banish sorrow, tears and sighs.

70

ELIZABETH'S SONG
OH

H! that we two were maying
over the

fragrant leas;
like children with young flowers playing
down the stream of the rich spring breeze.
Oh! that we two sat dreaming
on the sward of some sheep-trimmed down;
watching the white mist streaming,
from river and mead and town.
Oh! that we two lay sleeping
under the church-yard sod;
with our limbs at rest in the quiet earth's breast,
and our souls at home with God!

C. KINGSLEY

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R

ETIRE, and timely, from the world, if ever

,

its gaudy jewels from thy bosom sever,

despise its pomp and praise.
The purest star that looks into the stream

its slightest ripple shakes,
and Peace, where'er its fierce splendours gleam,

her brooding nest forsakes.
The quiet planets roll with even motion

in the still skies alone;
o'er Ocean they dance joyously, but Ocean
they find no rest upon.

W. S. LANDOR

72

WE'LL GO NO MORE A ROVING

So

O, we'll go no more a roving

though the heart be still as loving,

and the moon be still as bright. For the sword outwears its sheath,

and the heart wears out the breast, and lips must pause to breathe,

and love itself have rest.

Though the night was made for loving

and the day returns too soon, yet we'll go no more a roving

by the light of the moon.

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pleasure in every clime I've found,

but sought in vain for rest.
While glory sighs for other spheres,

I feel that one's too wide,
·and think the home, which love endears,

worth all the world beside.
The needle thus, too rudely moved,

wanders unconscious where;
till having found the place it loved,

it trembling settles there.

T. MOORE

75

GRIEF AND BEAUTY
DRY
RY those fair, those crystal eyes,

which like growing fountains rise
to drown their banks. Grief's sullen brooks
would better flow in furrowed looks:

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