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A monthly publication of about 300 pages a year, and the organ of the American Peace Society, is devoted to discussions, notices, and intelligence relative to the cause of peace, and the application of Christianity to the intercourse of nations.

Terms. One dollar in advance, with an increase of 50 cts, if not paid before the close of the year. Six copies for $5; twenty for $15; thirty for $21; fifty for $30; one hundred for $50. Subscribers may commence with any number. No subscriptions received for less than a year, or discontinued till arrearages are paid, except at our discretion. W Any person sending us two new subscribers with pay for one year, shall receive a copy gratis for one year.

RECOMMENDATIONS. The ablest writers are expected to contribute to the work, and no pains will he spared to render it useful and interesting to all classes, and worthy of such recommendations as the following: “An interesting periodical :--containing much important matter which is well adapted to interest, &c." Chr. Register.

“It deserves, and, sustaining its presont elevated character, will find an extended circulation.” Boston Recorder.

“ It is a work conducted, in our judgment, with more ability than any thing of the kind we have ever seen. Our acquaintance with its present editor, and some of the expected contributors to its pages, confirms our confidence that it will be a sound, useful and inter. esting work.” Signed by WILLIAM Jenks, D. D, Boston, Hon. SIDNEY WILLARD, Cambridge, Mass., and thirteen others.

CONSTITUTION OF THE Socraty. Object-lo illustrate the inconsistency of war with Christianity, to show its baleful influence on all the great interests of mankind, and to deviso means for insuring universal and permanent peace.-Condition of membership. Persons of every denomination, whatever their views concerning wars called defensive, may become members by paying $2 a year, Life-members by $20, and Life-directors by $50. Ministers preaching and taking up a collection for the Society, entitled to the Advocate. One hall of all contributions returned, if requested during the year, in peace publications.

SUGOESTIONS IN FOAMING APIILIARIES. 1. That their object be to promote the cause by coöperating with the parent Society. No other pledge rocommended. 2. That every member pay something, receiving, if sufficient, the Advocate, but, if not, one half in other peacepublications. 3. That the officers be few, and the main reliance placed on a small Èxecuiive Committee, with power to fill all vacancies. Time and place of annual meeting left with them.

Communications, post paid, 10 Geo. C. BeoxWITH, Cor.' Secretary, and JAMES R. WHIPPLE, Treasurer, in either case, to the care of Whipple & Damrell, No. 9 Cornhill, Boston.

AGENTS. Boston, WHIFLE & DAMRELL.

Philadelphia, N. Kite, 50 North Fourth Si. Portland, Me., WILLIAM HYDE.

Montpelier, V., E. P. WALTON. New Bedford, Mass., W.C. TABER.

Stockbridge, Mass., Rev. T. S. CLARKE. Fair Hader, Mass. CHARLES Drew.

Ner Ipswich, N. H., Rev. SAMUEL LEE. New York, Ezra COLLIER, 114 Nassau St. Newport, N. H., Rev. John Woods.

PEACE PUBLICATIONS,
FOR SALE AT THE SOCIETY'S GENERAL DEPOSITORY,

No. 9 CORNHILL.
DYMOND ON WAR, 8vo. pamphlet form.
do.

12mo., bound, with Grimke's Notes.
DISSERTATION ON A CONGRESS OF NATIONS, 12mo.
UPHAM'S MANUAL OF PEACE, 8vo.
STONE'S SERMONS ON WAR, 18mo.
OBSTACLES AND OBJECTIONS TO THE CAUSE OF PEACE. By a Layman.
GRIMKE'S ADDRESS EEFORE THE CONN. PEACE SOCIETY.
HICKOK'S do,

do. Pres. WHEATON'S

do.
DIALOGUES ON PEACE.
PUBLICATIONS OF THE LONDON PEACE SOCIETY.
HANCOCK ON PEACE.
SOLEMN REVIEW. By Dr. WORCESTER, 8vo.

pp.

24.
SOLEMN APPEAL. By WM. LADD. 8vo. pp. 40.
CAUSE OF PEACE, 12mo. pp. 18.
SKETCH OF WAR, 12mo. pp. 12.
WAR AND THE BIBLE, 12mo. pp. 4.
TESTIMONIES AGAINST WAR, 12mo. pp. 12.

do.

ADVOCATE OF PEACE.

No. VIII.

SEPTEMBER, 1838.

ENCOURAGEMENTS FOR WRITERS AND SPEAKERS TO ENGAGE

IN THE CAUSE OF PEACE.

Why are there. so few writers and speakers in favor of permanent and universal peace? It is not because there are no eloquent inen who feel that such a consummation is devoutly to be wished, but because the world is deluded with a notion of its impracticability. Are there not, however, great encouragements for those who have a pen to wield, or a voice to speak, to employ them in this cause?

A mere possibility of securing an end so noble in conception, and so full of certain and immeasurable benefit, should itself be a powerful incitement. But there is reason to believe, that the attempt, resolutely and patiently made, would succeed. The Christian world has been a great slaughter-field; but the analogy of its progress in other respects, for a century, proves that it needs only men of perseverance, broad views, and expanded benevolence, to make it, in half that time, a beautiful garden, bearing abundantly the fruits of peace.

W bat erroneous sentiment relative to peace cannot be corrected? What selfish passions,—the spring of war,—cannot be turned into peaceful channels? Because the labor of removing deep-rooted prejudices and inveterate passions in favor of war is so great, writers may indolently say. “We can do nothing more than lament its greatness ;' but is it not unmanly to be disheartened by its greatness, since the blessed consequences of its achievement are greater still ?

The work is arduous. It requires wisdom, and labor, and self-denial. But to a noble mind, the arduousness of such an VOL. II.-NO. VIII.

7

enterprise is a reason, not for reluctance, but for eagerness, to engage in it. Here, as elsewhere, success will be in proportion to effort.

Another encouragement is the success of past efforts. Few have been the organized efforts so to correct the public mind as to lead it to aim at permanent peace; yet these bave had their share in producing the Pacific state of the world. The noiseless reports and essays on peace have awakened some of the learned and powerful to inquiry. The endeavor to lead nations to refer their disputes to an umpire, instead of the sword, secures attention. What, but the progress of pacific views, has for years held back the principal nations of Europe, with millions of men in arms, from ravage and blood ? From the past we may infer, that, could a few master spirits infuse into the literature of Europe and America, “in thoughts that breathe, and words that burn,” a love of peace, and a detestation of war, the mass of mind would be controlled, jealousy allayed, and armies disbanded. When the truth, that war, the

“Mad game the world so loves to play,” in which kings are gainers, and their subjects losers, can by the voice and pen be wrought into the daily sentiments of the reading part of the world, the remainder will not be duped to play it longer.

Already have the few writers on peace convinced some, that there is higher bonor than that of arms, and that the real heroes and benefactors of the world are those whose benevolent hearts and powejful intellects have achieved moral, bloodless revolutions, to elevate and bless the race. They have succeeded in gaining the public mind, in proportion to their zeal and clearness in presenting truth; and no reason exists why zeal, and argument, and facts, should not continue to prevail. Our cause, once almost universally deemed chimerical, now commands respect from wise men. What may we not expect, when greater efforts are made, in more propitious circumstances, and by greater numbers? Will not the public conscience yield to written and living eloquence, and be moulded by those who will vigorously attempt to do it?

The success of other moral enterprises is an encouragement. The trade in slaves was once as honorable as is now that of war. For centuries, had African villages been burnt, the endearing ties of kindred rent asunder, and millions chained in the slave-ship to perish, to be cast into the deep, or forced to

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