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Dec. 6. The celebrated Joseph John Gurney is in this city, and yesterday I sent him a note desiring to know when it would be convenient for me to call upon bimn. In answer, he invited himself to breakfast this morning at Dr. Cock's whose hospitality I have enjoyed ever since I arrived in the city. You may depend on it, I improved every moment of the time. My object was to interest him in the peace cause generally, and to get him to induce the Friends in this country to aid the cause of peace, and in England to help on with the Congress of Nations. Without my asking him for any thing, he gave me one hundred dollars, expressly for publishing the essays on a Congress of Nations. This is the third hundred dollar subscriber which we have to this work; but after all it drags heavily.

Mr. Ladd's visit to Princeton.

PHILADELPHIA, Dec. 24, 1838. MY DEAR FRIEND, I left New York on the 14th inst. on my way to the South. As I was to pass within nine miles of Princeton, I felt “ my mind exercised,” as the Friends would say, to visit that important station. Accordingly, I left the cars at Whitestown, and took the siage wagon for Princeton, and arrived about 7 o'clock.

As soon as I had supped, I set out to call on the Rev. Samuel Miller, D. D., Prof. of Eccl. Hist. and Ch. Gov. When I reflected on the difficulty which I had, when I was here before, about three or four years ago, to gain admittance for the cause of Peace in this theological seminary, I must acknowledge that I had great misgivings; but“ never despair,” is the motto which I inscribe on my banners. Dr. Miller is a very accomplished gentleman, and he received me with great cordiality. He said he could not go with us in opposing war in every supposable case; but he frankly admitted that there never had been a war since the promulgation of the gospel, in which its precepts had not been violated on boih sides, and he gave his free consent that I should lecture to the students, but wished me to call on Dr. Alexander.

The next morning I called on Dr. Alexander, the Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology, who at once consented to my request, and I appointed that afternoon at 3 o'clock. He said he would give notice to his class, and see that notice was given to others. On my return, on looking for Dr. Miller, to advise of the time appointed, I found him in his lecture room, and I attended an excellent lecture on sacred chronology. After the lecture he walked with me to the college to introduce me to the Rev. James Carnahan, the president, and the Rev. John Maclean, the vice president. They were not at home; but I afterwards found them, and Mr. Maclean kindly invited me to dinner, and to spend the time I remained at Princeton at his house. Indeed, I have found the most abundant hospitality ever since I left my residence at Portsmouth, and have not had occasion to spend a single day at any public house, though I have sometimes done so, in hopes of greater usefulness.

I held my lecture in the Oratory of the theological seminary, and found it well filled. Drs. Miller and Alexander were present, and Mr. Maclean. Dr. Miller requested the scholars to stop after the lecture, and, as I supposed he wished to criticise it, I retired. I afterwards understood, that he entirely approved of all that I had said. I took my tea with Dr. Charles Hodge, Professor of Ori. and Bib. Lit., who is ill, and he invited me to repeat my visit to Princeton. These three Professors agree with us in practice, but differ a little in principle, and are willing to have the subject discussed. If every one who is favorable to the cause of Peace would do something in his own way, and according to his own principles, the rk would soon be done.

I bad no opportunity to preach on the Sabbath, which is almost the only Sabbath on which I have not preached since our anniversary in May last; but I heard an excellent sermon, in the chapel of the theological seminary, by Dr.

Alexander, from the words of our Saviour, recorded in John 1: 47, “ Behold an Israelite indeed, in whom is no guile.". If I had wanted a sermon to encourage me in carrying on an unpopular work of God, I could scarcely have asked for a better one. The sermon was entirely extempore, and was very superior both in matter and delivery. There is here no afternoon sermon. In the evening, I heard an excellent discourse, in the Presbyterian church, by the Rev. John Breckenridge, D. D., Professor of Pastoral Theology and Missionary Instruction, from Phil. 2: 4, “ Look not every man on his own things, but every man also on the things of others,” in which I thought he went the whole length of our peace principles. I afterwards called at his house, but did not find him at home. I left bim Dymond, and some other tracts. I likewise called on the Rev. Addison Alexander, associate instructor in the department of Ori. and Bib. Lit., who, I understood, had preached a peace sermon last thanksgiving day.

On Tuesday evening, according to appointment, I delivered a lecture on a Congress of Nations in the college. The attendance was good, and so was the attention, and I hope good was done. I did not circulate the petition for a Congress of Nations, as I intended, either in the seminary or in the college, because I understood, that the instructors were unfavorable to such a measure, and I think we ought always to consult the wishes of the faculty in our seminaries. On Thursday I took the stage for Philadelphia, having “finished my ministry” in Princeton, as the Friends would say, and in mercantile language, “having done a pretty good business." I distributed many of our peace tracts, and left about foriy Dymonds with Mr. Rufus Taylor, a theological student, who had heard me lecture at Amherst, Mass., and is a thorough-going peace man, who promised to distribute them to advantage. I also held discus. sions with some of the students, but not so many as I desired. I also left with Mr. Taylor a set of the Herald of Peace, and a full set of the English

I said I did a good business in Princeton. I meant in a moral, not a peconiary, sense; for I did not get a cent of money there, and I did not ask it. It is very distressing to have to go with the olive-branch in one hand, and the contribution-box in the other. If our friends who have been long indoctrinated in the principles of Peace, do not help us, what are we to expect froin dew converts ? As you observe in your last, “Our friends must come more promptly to our aid, or I do not see how we are to get along.' We have done more, according to the help afforded us, than any other society that ever attempted to change poublic opinion on any subject; but what can we do without means? Give us the means, and we will soon change the opinions of the world, for “the truth is great and it will prevail;"> but if it be never presented it can never prevail. If the tempest of war should again come over our land, and sweep away our literary and theological seminaries, and our Bible, tract, and missionary societies, what can they say, who have never prayed the Lord to “ do as he hath said,” and cause the swords to be beaten into ploughshares? Your fellow-laborer in the cause of peace,

WM. LADD.

tracts.

Receipts from December 15 to January 15. Neuton, Mass., Rev. Mr. Gilbert's

E. Alden, from the estate of the par. in part,.....

$7,00 late Thomas W. Tolman,.......... 100,00 Andover W. Par., additional......... 2,00 Peru, N. Y., Seth Terry, for Adv., 1,00 West Medway, Mass.,..

20,63 Cornwall, V., Dea. Jeremiah BingGardner, Mass., additional,......... 3,00

ham,..

10,00 Cambridge, Mass., Dr. Oliver,....... 5,00 Others, to con. Rev. L. Miner, L. Woburn, Mass., Abijah Thompson,.. 2,00

M., .

12,00 Warren Fox,...

2,00 Nero Haven, Vt., W. Nash,. Others,.... 31,50 Others,..

7,75 Randolph, Mass., by the hand of Dr. Pittsfield, V., seven individuals,..... 7,00

$212,88

2,00

A monthly publication of about 300 pages a year, and the organ of the American Peace Society, is devoted to discussions, notices, and intelligence relative to the cause of peace, and the application of Christianity to the intercourse ot nations.

Terms. One dollar in advance, with an increase of 30 ets., if not paid before the close or the year. Six copies for $5; twenty for $15; thirty for $21; fifty for $30 : one hundredt for $50. Subscribers nay commence with any number. No subscription received for less than a year, or discontinued till arrenrages are paid, except at our discretion. Any perem sending uls two new subscribers with pay for one year, shall receive a copy gretis for one year.

RECOMMEYDATIONS. The ablest writers are expected to contribute to the work, and no pains will be spared 1 render it useful and interesting to all classes, and worthy of such recommeodations as the following: “An interesting periodical ;-containing much important nsatter which is well adaplou to interesi, &c." Chr Register.

“ It deserves, and, sustaining its present elevated character, will find an extended circulation.” Boslón Recorder.

“It is a work conducted, in our judgment, with more ability than any thing of the kind we liave ever seen. Our acquaintance with its prosent editor, and some of the expected contributors lo ils pages, confirms our confidence that it will be a sound, useful and interesting work.” Signed by WILLIAM JENXS, D. D., Buston, Hon. SIDNET WILLAXD, Cambridge, Mass., and thirteen others.

CONSTITUTION OF THE SOCIETY. Object--10 illustrate the inconsistenry of war with Christianity, to show its baleful influence on all the great interests of mankind, and to de. vise means for insuring universal and permanent peace.-Condition of memberskip. Per sons of every denomination, whatever their views concerning wars called defeusive, may become members by paying $2 a year, Life-members by $20, and Lite-directors by $50. Ministers preaching and taking up a collection for the Society, entitled to the Advocate. One balf of all contributions returned, if requested during the year, in peace publications.

SUGGESTIONS IN FORMING AUXILIARIES. 1. That their object be to promote ibe tause by coöperating with the Parent Society. No other pledge recommended. 2. That every mem. her pay something, receiving, if sufficient, the Advocate, but, if not, one ball in other peacepublications. 3." "That the officers le fer, and the main reliance placed on a small Executive Committee, with power to fill all vacancies. Time and place of annual meeting left with them.

Communications, post paid, to Geo. C. Beckwith, Cor. Secretary, and JAMES K WhirPLE, Treasurer, in either case, to the care of Whipple & Damrell, No. 9 Cornhill, Boston.

AGENTS. Boston, WHIPILE & DAMRELL.

Philadelphia, N, KITE, 50 North Fourth St. Portland, Me., WILLIAM HYDE.

Montpelier, V., E. P. Walton. New Bedford, Mass., W. C. TABER.

Stockbridge, Mass., Rev. T. S. CLARKE. Fair Haven, Mass , ChanLES DREW.

New Ipswich, N. H. Rev. SAMUEL LEE. New York, Ezra COLLIER, 144 Nassau St. Newport, N. H. Rev. Jorn Woodr. Farmington, Ct., EDWARD HOOKER.

Noriich, Cl., ALPHEUS KINGSBURY, Hartford, Ct., SPALDING & STORRS.

New London, Ct., THOMAS DOUGLASS. Midilletown, Ct., Edwin HÚNT.

PEACE PUBLICATIONS,
FOR SALE AT THE SOCIETY'S GENERAL DEPOSITORY,

NO. 9 CORNHILL.
DYMOND ON WAR, 8vo. pamphlet form.

do. 12mo., bound, with Grimke's Notes,
DISSERTATION ON A CONGRESS OF NATIONS, 12mo.
UPILAM'S MANUAL OF PEACE, 8vo.
STONE'S SERMONS ON WAR, 18mo.
OBSTACLES AND OBJECTIONS TO TAE CAUSE OF PEACE, By a Layman.
JUVENILE STORIES ON PEACE.
GRIMKE'S ADDRESS BEFORE THE CONN. PEACE SOCIETY.
HICKOK's do.

do, Pres. WHEATON'S do.

do.
PUBLICATIONS OF THE LONDON PEACE SOCIETY.
CAPT, THRUSH, ON THE UNLAWFULNESS OF WAR. &vo, An excellent wort.
DUTY OF MINISTERS TO THE CAUSE OF PEACE, 8vo. 12 pp.
A CONGRESS OF NATIONS, 8vo, 12 pp.
SOLEMN REVIEW, By Dr. WORCESTER. 8vo. pp. 24.
SOLEMN APPEAL. By Wu. Ladn. 8vo. pp. 40.
DIALOGUES ON PEACE TESTIMONIES AGAINST WAR, 12mo. pp. 12,
HANCOCK ON PEACE WAR AND THE BIBLE. 12mo. pp 4.
CAUSE OF PEACE, 12mo. pp. 18. SKETCH OF WAR, 12mo. pp. 12.

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Postage.—Less than 100 miles, I cis.-over 100 miles, 24 cts.

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CONTENTS.
Page.

Page. Safety of pacific principles........

217 Effect of war disturbances in Canada on International arbitramont,..........

222
missionary efforts there,...

230 Case of France and Mexico,.......... 222 The war method of keeping peace,. 231 The United States as a general medi

War scenes,

232 ator,......

223 Capture of Vera Cruz,.............. 232 Arbitration as the permanent policy of Britle of Trafalgar....................

233 our government,... 223 Siege of Genoa,..

234 A congress of nations to settle the in

Invasion of France in the last war ternational code,....

225
with Napoleon,...

236 A court of nations as a standing board Agencies,...... of arbitratory,.......

226

Prize Essays on a congross of nations,... 239 Objections to a court of nations,.. 226 Receipte,..

240 Reference better than litigation, 229

... 237

BOSTON:
WHIPPLE AND DAMRELL,

GERERAL DEPOSITORY NO. 9 CORXHILI

1839.

Postmasters are requested, where this work is not taken from the office, to return it to the Postmaster at Boston, immediately, KF ACCORDING TO LAW, writing upon it the pame of the subscriber and place of residence.

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