Графични страници
PDF файл
ePub

Auspicious movements.-In Middlebury College, where a peace society was organized last year with encouraging prospects, the Philadelphian Society, including most, if not all the pious students, “has recently resolved itself into three committees to inquire into the condition of sailors, soldiers, and the Jews.A letter from the chairman of the committee of soldiers (M. W. Safford), to our Secretary, asks for information concerning “ their numbers, expenses, moral condition, means of instruction, &c.,” to assist the inquiries of the committee. We shall be happy to render them all the assistance in our power; and we hope they will find a partial answer to their inquiries in this and every succeeding number of our work.

Our Secretary has, also, been invited to attend discussions appointed by some ecclesiastical bodies on questions of great importance to the cause of peace, and in one case, before a rising school of the prophets.” We hail such discussions before such bodies, as omens of much promise to our cause, and trust the day is not far distant when the main points of this long-neglected, yet momentous subject, will be thoroughly investigated by every minister, every candidate for the ministry, and every Christian in the land.

Aspect of the times. We know of no general war now in progress; but portions of Christendom are in a more disturbed and ominous state than any other part of the world. The civil war in Spain is still raging with doubtful prospects as to its ultimate results, having already sacrificed probably more than half a million of lives. The Republics of South America appear to be on the eve of a war that is likely to involve them all, Buenos Ayres having recently declared war against Peru, now under the protection of the President of Bolivia, and Chili having some time ago proclaimed hostilities against Peru; so that there are now two against two; Chili and Buenos Ayres against Bolivia and Peru. Mexico seems more pacifically inclined; and if our own government treats that nation, and the Texian outlaws as they respectively deserve, peace between the two countries will doubtless be preserved. The death of William IV., the pacific king of England, and mediutor of Christendom, is a serious loss to the cause of peace; but the cause, we believe, has much to hope from the reported character and disposition of his youthsul successor, Victoria I.

Interesting intelligence deferred.—We have just received an account of the proceedings at the late anniversary of the London Peace Society, two letters from their Corresponding Secretary, and a communication from Count de Sellon, the well-known founder of the Geneva Peace Society. But the lateness of their arrival necessarily excludes them all from the present number of our work, and leaves us room only to say, that the London anniversary is represented as more interesting than usual; that the resolves of our own Society, at its annual meeting in 1836, with reference to king William's profler of his services as mediator between the United States and France, and the address to his majesty, had been formally presented through Lord Palmerston, and received by the monarch in a very kind and courteous manner; and that the state of the public mind in England is becoming more and more favorable to the cause of peace.

The Advocate. We hope our friends will make special efforts soon to extend the circulation of our periodical. 1. Because we deem its circulation the best means of promoting the cause through the press, and altogether essential to its increasing prosperity. 2. Because it is so very cheap that no friend of peace, possessed of ordinary means, can well refuse to take it. 3. Because it would be easy for members of the Society, for subscribers to the work, and ministers who receive it on condition of pleading the cause before their people, to procure, if they would, a large increase of subscribers with very little effort. Will they not do so, and send the names with the money to the Society's Depository?

Printers, Booksellers and Stationers,

No. 9 CORNHILL, BOSTON,

- Publish the following WorksTIIREE EXPERIMENTS OF LIVING.-Living withio the Moons. Living up to the Means. Living beyond the Means.

This is a useful, pructical work, of which about 25,000 copies have been sold within a few months.

(Extracts from Notices of the Work.] “The characters presented are natural, well drawn, and well sustained, and some of them exhibit to the life the ridiculous vanity of those who, by fine houses, and corresponding displays of wealth in dress, equipage and fashionable parties, eodeavor to outshine their neighbors, and be the first in society." Southern Religious Telegraph.

"The advantage and comfort of living within the means; the imprudence of living up to the means; and the miserable folly and inevitable wretchedocss that ensue from living beyond the means, are brought home to overy capacity by the progress of a story illustrating ihe conduct and condition of a family in each of these experiments. Writers who devote themselves to benefit their follow-creatures by standard works of this nature, are deserving of all commendation." --Knickerbocker.

ELINOR FULTON. A Sequel to Three Experiments of Living.

“ The Sequel is full of interesting incidents, is true to nature, brings ont some valuable instruction in regard to Domestics-and portrays in vivid colors the excellences of the heroine of the story, with the rewards that commonly aitend them, in whomsoever they may appear."Boston Recorder.

“ The book is a troysury of valuable thoughts, principally relating to domestic economy, but comprising many correct and beautiful delineations of character, both of classes and indi. viduals." -New England Speclator.

RICH ENOUGH ; a Tale of the Times. By the author of Throe Experiments of Living.'

“ It has less gratitication for the spirit of novel reading than either of lior former works, but not less of practical wisdom. It should be studied by all Wall street; hy all the merchantprinces' in all our citics.”_New York Observer.

“ This little story is peculiarly a tale of the times, and well adapted to minister a salutary check to some of those faults which have tended to bring the country to its present condition." Neoburyport Herald.

“The name of the author alone would give it a run, oven if it did not contain the good sense it does. We like the author's view of wealth! Prosperity is given us for the benefit of others. It is but tou true a picture of many a scenu that has occurred within the last six months."'Evening Gazette.

THE YOUNG CHRISTIAN; or a familiar Illastration of Christian Duty. By Rev. JaCOB ABBOTT.

THE CORNER STONE; or a familiar Illustration of the Principles of Christian 'Truth. " Jesus Christ himself being the chief Corner Stone." By Rev. Jacor ADBOTT.

THE WAY TO DO GOOD; or the Christian Character mature. The Sequel 10 the Young Christian and Corner Stone. By Rev. Jacob ABBOTT.

THE BIBLICAL ANALYSIS; or a Topical Arrangement of the Instructions of the Holy Scriptures. Adapted to the use of Ministers, Sabbath School and Bible Class Teachers, &c. Compiled by J. U. Parsons. TEMPERANCE TALES. By the author of " My Mother's Gold Ring."

There are now 15 nunibers belonging to this very uselul and interesting series, and upwards of 200,000 copies have been sold since their first publication.

The numbers from I to 15 are also neutly bound in cloth, making fuur volumes of about 200 pages each.

No. 1.-MY MOTHER'S GOLD RISG.
No. 2-WILD DICK AND GOOD LITTLE ROBIN.
No, 3.--I AM AFRAID THERE IS A GOD.
No. 4.--A SECTARIAN THING.
No. 5. --GROGGY HARBOR.
No. 6.-RIGHT OPPOSITE.
No. 7.-FRITZ HAZELL.
No. 8.-JOHNNY HODGES.
No. 9.- A WORD IN SEASON.
No. 10.--SEED TIME AND HARVEST.
No. ll.-AN IRISH HEART.
No. 12.-WELL ENOUGH FOR THE VULGAR.
No. 13.-NANCY LE BARON.
No. 14.-XUTY GRAFTON,

15.-TOO FAST AND TOO FAR. “We say, let these Tales be widely circulated through the land. Let them be given to every young man and maiden, and to every child in our Sabbath schools. Above all, let them be i brust into the bouse of every distiller and rum-seller; and if they do not break up by their influence their horrid business, it is because that business has destroyed every feeling of humanity and tenderness in their breasts."- Journal of the Am. Temperance Union.

The Advocate of Peace, a quarterly of 200° pages a year, devoted, 1. To discussions of subjects connected with the cause of peace; 2. To notices of current publications involving its principles or interests; 3. To intelligence concerning its progress, and the general state of the world as affecting this cause.

Terms. One dollar payable on delivery of the first number. Seven copies for $5, and fifteen for $10, sent to one address. A liberal discount to auxiliary societies. Friends of the cause are earnestly desired to take it themselves, and procure other subscribers.

To Ministers of the Gospel.--As their residence is frequently changed, as some are occasionally removed by death, and others may possibly grow weary in this department of well-doing, it becomes necessary to request, that all ministers, desirous of having the Advocate continued after the current year, on condition of their preaching annually to their people on the subject of peace, should inform us within a year from this date; such information being indispensable to prevent any waste or misapplication of the funds devoted to this cause.

June 1, 1837. Communications relative to the concerns of the Advocate or the Society, may be addressed to Rev. Geo. C. BeckwITH, Corresponding Secretary, or to James K. WHIPPLE, Treasurer; in either case, directed to the care of Whipple & Damrell, No. 9 Cornhill, Boston, Mass.

AGENTS. WHIPPLE & DAMRELL, Boston. I. Wilcox, Providence, R. I. WILLIAM HYDE, Portland, Me. SIDNEY UNDERWOOD, ) New BedE. J. LANE, Dover, N. H.

WILLIAM C. TABOR, Š ford, Mass. A. BERRY, Hanover, Dart. Col. EZRA COLLIER, New York, 144 NasE. P. Walton, Montpelier, Vt.

sau Street. WILLIAM STEBBINS, N. Haven, Ct. NATHAN KITE, Philadelphia, 50 N. ALPHEUS KINGSLEY, Norwich,

4th Street. Rev. T. S. CLARKE, Stockbridge, Ms. Rev. Sam’L LEE, New Ipswich, N.H. Rev. John Wood, Newport, N. H.

PEACE PUBLICATIONS,
FOR SALE AT THE SOCIETY'S GENERAL DEPOSITORY,

NO. 9 CORNHILL. DYMOND'S ESSAYS ON WAR, with or without Grimké's Notes, and other writings on Peace,--the ablest work in the English language on the question, whether the gospel condemns all war.

DISSERTATION ON A CONGRESS OF NATIONS. By a Friend of Peace.

AMERICAN ADVOCATE OF PEACE, back nos. bound or otherwise.
HARBINGER OF PEACE, 3 vols. bound,
UPHAM'S MANUAL OF PEACE; a very able and interesting work.
SERMONS ON WAR. By THOMAS T. STONE.
Mr. LADD'S four vols. for Sabbath Schools.

ADDRESS TO LADIES ON PEACE—what they can and should do in its behalf.

OBSTACLES AND OBJECTIONS TO THE CAUSE OF PEACE. By a Layman. PEACE STORIES FOR CHILDREN. TRACTS of the Am. Peace Society, first and second series. TRACTS of the London Peace Society, thirteen numbers.

[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed]
« ПредишнаНапред »