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Lac .,
Honey.
Bees' wax.
Cotton.
Caoutchouc,
leaves.

Earthenware
Pottery.
Cotton cloths.
Dhaos.
Spades.

Lime.
Coal.

Bice.
Millet.
Job's tears.
Sugarcane.
Chillies.

Sohphlang (a kind of

esculent turnip). Rico

Job's tears.

Ginger.

Chillies.

Millet.

IndiaU'COrn.

Bice

Millet.

Ginger.

Chillies.

Job's tears.

Cotton.

Caoutchouc.

Rice

Millet.

Oranges.

Betel-nuts.

Betel leaves.

Turmeric.

Millet

Oranges.

Betel-nuts.

Jack-fruit.

Pineapples.

Chillies.

Bay leaves.

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Between the Lushai tract and the British district of Tipperah on HiilTi crah ^e west> lies the hill territory of the

1 'ppcr*' Tipperah Eajah. This State is under

no specific engagement to us, though its Rajah is a British zemindar, deriving the greater portion of his income from landed property in the adjoining regulation district of Tipperah. The succession to the chiefship has several times been decided by the result of suits for the zemindary in the Privy Council, and it has now been ruled by Government that the Rajah should pay a succession duty to the paramount power. The State itself is now surrounded by tracts under our control. A political agent has been appointed there, and it is now practically a feudatory State.

The following particulars are given in the statements:—

NATIVE STATE OF HILL TIPPERAH.

Name of State.—Ilill Tipporah.

In subsidiary alliance or feudatory.—Feudatory.

Tribute in men or money.—Formerly a nuzzerana of 125 goldmohurs at the ceremony of installation. Now, according to Government Resolution dated 3oth March 1870, half a year's revenue of the State in tho case of direct, and a whole year's revenuo in the case of indirect, successions.

Population.—About 35,000.

Supposed gross rerenue.—Rs. 1,45,000.

Military force.—About 400 men. Of these, from 100 to 150 are pretty good soldiers, the rest below the averago police.

Principal articles of production, including manufactures and mines—Rice, cotton, timber, bamboos, canes, fire-wood.

No manufactures beyond those required for the commonest necessaries of life.

Noi'

Turning northward, we have on the plains at the foot of the Bhutan „ , „ , Hills the feudatory State of Cooch

Cooch liehar. , , i. j • zi_ -a

Benar, at present, during the minority of the Rajah, under the direct management of British officers. This State first sought our aid in 1772, when, in consideration of the cession in perpetuity of half its revenues as then ascertained and an acknowledgement of subjection to the British Government, we drove out the Bhiitanese who held possession of its Rajah and capital. Cooch Behar has an area of 1,292 square miles. It is surrounded by the districts of Julpigoree, Rungpore, to the latter of which its land-revenue is credited. The following table gives some particulars regarding it:—

Name of State.—Cooch Behar.

In subsidiary alliance or feudatory.—Feudatory.

Tribute in men or money.—In money, Its. 67,700-15.

Date of treaty, with authority.—5th April 1773—Aitchison, Vol. I, p. 151.

Population.—532,505.

Supposed gross rerenue.—Rs 0,20,662.

Military force.—SO sepoys.

Transit duties or not.—No transit duties.

Principal articles of production, including manufactures and mines.—Rice, tobacco, jute, mnstavd-seed, and bamboos. The manufactures arc insignificant, and consist chiefly of mustard oil, gunny-cloth, and brass vessels. There are no mines.

Leaving the north-east frontier, we come to the tributary estates „ of Chota Nagporo and Orissa on the

OhotaNagporeMehals. south-west frontier of Bengal. Most

of the Chota Nagpore estates form part of a group of 21 mehals ceded by the Mahrattas, the remainder of which are now under the Central Provinces Government. These estates are governed by their own chiefs under the control of the Commissioner, and are exempted from the operation of the ordinary laws. The chiefs dispose of civil matters and minor criminal cases, sending up heinous offences for the orders of the Commissioner, who exercises a general control over their administration in other respects.

There are 18 similar estates under the Commissioner of Orissa, u . m t t , known as the Cuttack Tributary Mehals.

Cuttack Tributary Mohuls. ml n j v xv.

lliese also were made over by the Mahrattas in full sovereignty, but for administration purposes have been left to be managed by their chiefs, styled in the old regulations "hill or jungle zemindars." By regulations of 1805 they were exempted from the operation of the ordinary laws and regulations in force in the rest of Orissa and Bengal. Two of these, Angool and Bankee, have lapsed to Government owing to the misconduct of their chiefs.

The following statement gives particulars regarding the Tributary Mehals.

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