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in iniquity. He is not indeed, freed from sin, for then he were perfectly happy; but it is now t the object of his abhorrence, and he is looking anxiously forward to the time, when it shall no more break in upon his enjoyment.

Thus we have attempted to give a cursory sketch of the nature and design of the mission of our Saviour; we have endeavored to show how he reconciled the forgiveness of sinners, and their reception into favor with the justice and purity of the divine character; and also the fitness of the means employed for this purpose, and the wondrous change produced by them, upon the character of man. And now let the reader solemnly ask his own heart, 'Am I a partaker of the mercy here exhibited?' 'Have I been led to commit my soul to the keeping of Jesus?'

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On the result of these questions depends our eternal happiness. And in this important inquiry let us not deceive ourselves;-'A tree is known by its fruits.' If our character does not correspond with the precepts of the gospel, whatever we may think, we have not believed it. And if we thus find that our belief has been merely nominal, let us seek God before it be too late;-let us come to him in the way which he has appointed while it is called to-day;-let us recollect that 'now is the accepted time, and now is the day of salvation.' Let us remember that every moment we put off, our hearts are acquiring an additional degree of hardness; and let us take warning from the declaration, that 'He that being often reproved, hardeneth his neck, shall suddenly be destroyed, and that without remedy.'

But, if we do experience something of that joy and love which the gospel describes, and have thus

reason to think that we have believed in the Son of God; let us not be content with what we have already obtained,-let us forget the things that are past, and press onward to the things which are before, for the prize of our high calling in Christ Jesus. Let us recollect that there is no standing still; that if we are not growing in holiness and spiritual strength, we must be falling back. Let us beware of thinking that the contest is over, as though we were already perfect; let us remember that sanctification is a progressive work; that it is not to be attained in a single day, or a single year, or in a series of many years, nor ever wholly attained, so long as we remain in this world of sin.

As a means of attaining greater degrees of grace, let us look to the Saviour and reflect on his finished work; the more we think on his sufferings, the more will we hate sin, which was the cause of them! The more we reflect on his love to us, the more will we love in return; for 'we love him, because he first loved us.' With our love, our holiness will increase, and we shall be the more assimilated to his glorious character; and consequently, we shall the more largely partake of that happiness which is enjoyed by him in full perfection. The subject of the love of God as exhibited in the atonement, is infinite, and will be the theme of our praises through eternity. But though never able fully to comprehend, yet may we ever be learning more of the height, and depth, and breadth, and length of that love which passeth knowledge.

This paper contains a very excellent view of all the leading truths of the gospel. They are every one of them stated fairly, and are all blended to

gether in admirable harmony. No undue importance or prominence is given to any one topic, while the practical design of the whole is constantly kept in view. It discovers a discrimination and justness of conception, as well as an extent of acquaintance with divine truth, very rarely to be found in a youth of sixteen.

Even at this early period, and while so little accustomed to composition, he was above the ambition of fine writing. Here is no attempt at it; and yet the language is admirable for its appropriateness and simplicity. His mind was evidently filled with the importance of the subject; and from the abundance of his heart his mouth spake. His only object was to express himself clearly and forcibly; and in this he completely succeeded.

My personal intercourse with him was shortly after this time brought nearly to a close. In consequence of removing to London, our subsequent connexion was maintained chiefly by letters. He employed himself, of his own accord, after my removal, for several weeks, in making out a catalogue of my library; classifying the books, as well as numbering them and registering their titles. It is now in my possession, and evinces, at once, his correctness and diligence, and his love for the proprietor, as it must have cost him considerable labor. That labor, however, I am sure he never thought of; it gratified, in a small degree, his love of books, as he amused himself by looking at many of them as he passed them through his hands; and it afforded him the far higher gratification of doing an unsolicited service to a friend whom he loved. I now deeply, but unavailingly, regret, that my opportunities of personal usefulness to him, were not, on my part, sufficiently

reason to think that we have believed in the Son of God; let us not be content with what we have already obtained, let us forget the things that are past, and press onward to the things which are before, for the prize of our high calling in Christ Jesus. Let us recollect that there is no standing still; that if we are not growing in holiness and spiritual strength, we must be falling back. Let us beware of thinking that the contest is over, as though we were already perfect; let us remember that sanctification is a progressive work; that it is not to be attained in a single day, or a single year, or in a series of many years, nor ever wholly attained, so long as we remain in this world of sin.

As a means of attaining greater degrees of grace, let us look to the Saviour and reflect on his finished work; the more we think on his sufferings, the more will we hate sin, which was the cause of them! The more we reflect on his love to us, the more will we love in return; for 'we love him, because he first loved us.' With our love, our holiness will increase, and we shall be the more assimilated to his glorious character; and consequently, we shall the more largely partake of that happiness which is enjoyed by him in full perfection. The subject of the love of God as exhibited in the atonement, is infinite, and will be the theme of our praises through eternity. But though never able fully to comprehend, yet may we ever be learning more of the height, and depth, and breadth, and length of that love which passeth knowledge.

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