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lishment of modern Rome than Augustus Cæsar did to ancient Rome in forty. The immense hospital, the four fine obelisks, the water-work, where he employed four thousand workmen, the improvements in the library, the statues of St. Peter and St. Paul, placed upon Antonine's and Trajan's pillar, evince his muini icent spirit. The distribution of his time alone can account for the vast works that he performed. Five hours he allotted then, to literature, seven to the cares of state, two to his private devotions, four to convivial recreation and society-the rest to sleep. When some of his counsellors grieved to see the Bible translated into Latin-" Oh, it will save those noble souls,'" said he, " who take no pains to learn Latin like the hereties.” Some years, before, in fact, when Calvin died, they were afraid of sending Montalto legate to Geneva, lest he should set up an independent sect. But though, besides all his public works, he daily maintained three hundred poor out of his privy pure, at his demise the public coffers were left fuller than they had been by any christian sovereign : “And this,” says he, "might any man do, who set his face against vice, the great devourer of money, time, and fame." His only sister, Camilla, was called into notice, her children were brought forward on every occasion, and nothing pleased him more than attentions to them. Yet although Philip II. sent jewels of enormous value to his niece, when she espoused the young Colonna, nothing could cure his hatred of the Spaniards; and when bigotted Olivarez, their ambassador, expressed his affliction that his Holiness had permitted a translation of Holy Writ; the Pope sitting profoundly silent, Olivarez observed it, and asked, “ what employed his mind so, and kept it from attending." I was just thinking, Sir,” replied Sextus, “which of these windows

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maids, and lived at the foot of Monte Alto, where that extraordinary son was born to them on the day Charles V. was crowned emperor. “ We set out together,” said Sextus V. often; " but fortune set me to keep pigs, when I wanted to be driving more rational, though not less obstinate animals."

The truth was, Tarli, the famous preacher, going to a wedding in that neighbourhood one day, saw this lad keep on crying while every one else seemed happy, “What dost cry for so, child ?" says

Tarli, " tell me."-"I cry," replies little Pe. retti, “because God gave me a heart to be a great man, and I am but a poor boy."-" Wilt thou study and be good, and learn to be a great man?" says the preacher.-" Yes, that I will, and keep pigs no more, but turn friar."_" Friars are al. ways poor, my child,' answered Tarli; “ those who despise poverty must not be friars," -"Well! I'll go through poverty then," replies the lad, “ as you go through purgatory--but I'll come out a great man."-" And so thou wilt, I am sure," exclaims the ecclesiastic, turning to his companion Selleri, who laughed, but said, " Show us the road to such a town, child, and don't cry any more." The boy ran before them without shoes, nor could threats or persuasion drive him back from their convent, where they clothed and taught him; till such were his acquirements, and such his proficiency, that the superiors counted him a prodigy of early science, and his protector Tarli, on his death-bed, pressed his hand, saying, “I grieve, dear Fælix, I can live no longer to witness your felicity and fame. You will be Pope, I'm sure you will."-" And from that day," says Sextus, * I resolved on't.” When settled in the seat he was born for, he relaxed not from study, nor stained his character with vice or fully; but in five years contributed, says Ziinmerman, more to the embel.

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Jishment of modern Rome than Augustus Cæsar did to ancient Rome in forty. The immense hospital, the four fine obelisks, the water-work, where he employed four thousand workmen, the improvements in the library, the statues of St. Peter and St. Paul, placed upon Antonine's and Trajan's pillar, evince his muniicent spirit. The distribution of his time alone can account for the vast works that he performed. Five hours he allotted then, to literature, seven to the cares of state, two to his private devotions, four to convivial recreation and society-the rest to sleep. When some of his counsellors grieved to see the Bible translated into Latin ' Oh, it will save those noble souls,said he, “ who take no pains to learn Latin like the hereties.” Some years, before, in fact, when Calvin died, they were afraid of sending Montalto legate to Geneva, lest he should set up an independent sect. But though, besides all his public works, he daily maintained three hundred poor out of his privy pur e, at his demise the public coffers were left fuller than they had been by any christian sovereign: “And this,” says he, "might any man do, who set his face against vice, the great devourer of money, time, and fame." His only sister, Camilla, was called into notice, her children were brought forward on every occasion, and nothing pleased him more than attentions to them. Yet although Philip II. sent jewels of enormous value to his niece, when she espoused the young Colonna, nothing could cure his hatred of the Spaniards; and when bigotted Olivarez, their ambassador, expressed his affliction that his Holiness had permitted a translation of Holy Writ; the Pope sitting profoundly silent, Olivarez observed it, and asked, " what employed his mind so, and kept it from attending"-" I was just thinking, Sir," replied Sextus, or which of these windows

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- your excellency might be thrown out of, that so with the fewest bones broken, you might learn to address Rome's master and your own with more respect."-" These Spaniards," said he afterwards, it will poison me, I know they will." And so he thought they did at last : but, like Flavius Vespa. sian, his model in many things, he laboured for Rome's welfare to the very limits of temporal existence; and then calling Castagna, his old friend, close to him, “ After pears *, " says he, « come chesnuts, you know; and do not, dear Monsignore, keep fretting so'about these heretics when you succeed, as I am confident you will, but remember 'tis the conversion, not the death of sinners which God requires." Castagna did succeed Peretti, but

lived not to obey him. The Sfonderati Pope, Gre. 'gory the Fourteenth, cut froin his dying mother, a

noble Cremonese, by the Cæsarian operation, survived them not a year. Innocent IX. reigned but seven weeks; and Clement the Eighth's pontificate was left to close the century with a magnificent ju. blee, caused by the conversion, and adomed by the absolution of Henry IV.

The Cabinet of Thirth.

Here let the jest and mirthful tale go round."

ANECDOTE OF DR. DODDRIDGE, RELATED BY ".

DR. JOHNSON.
DR. DODDRIDGE, being mentioned, he ob-

D) served, that he was the author of one of the finest epigrams in the English language. It is in Orton's Life of him. The subject is his familymotto,----Dum vivimus, vivamus; which, in its primary signification, is, to be sure, not very suit

* Peretti means little pears'in Italian, and Casture, means chesnuts,

able to a christian divine; but lie paraphrased it thus:

« Live, while you live, the epicure would say,
And seize the pleasures of the present day.
Live, while you live, the sacred preacher cries,
And give to God each moment as it flies.
Lord, in my views let both united be,
I live in pleasure, when I live lo thue.”

GOLDSMITH. I talked of the officers whom we had left today; how much service they had seen, and how little they had got for it, even of fame.-Johnson. " Sir, a soldier gets as little as any man can get." -Boswell. « Goldsmith has acquired more fame than all the officers last war, who were not generals.”Johnson. «Why, sir, you will find ten thousand fit to do what they did, before you find one who does what Goldsmith has done. You must consider, that a thing is valued according to its rarity. A pebble that paves the street is in itself more useful than the diamond upon a lady's finger."-I wish our friend Goldsmith had heard this.

He said, he was angry at Thrale, for sitting at General Oglethorp's without speaking. He censured a inan for degrading himself to a non-entity.

I observed, that Goldsmith was on the other extreme; for he spoke at all adventures.—Johnson. “ Yes, Goldsmith, rather than not speak, will talk of what he knows himself to be ignorant, which can only end in exposing him."-"I wonder, said I, if he feels that he exposes himself. If he was with two taylors''-" Or with two founders,” said Dr. Johnson, (interrupting me,) “ he would fall a talking on the method of making cannon, though both of them would soon see that he did not know what metal a cannon is made of.”

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